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  #1  
Old 10-29-09, 23:49
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luckyboy luckyboy is offline
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Default Doping in Soccer/Football

Just wanted to hear some people's opinions on this. I mean, we have all heard of two big Spanish teams being linked to OP, and team/s in Italy with their masses of legal drugs. But how widespread do people think it is in football/soccer? Try as I might, I can't imagine Fulham or Wigan players injecting themselves with whatever before a match.

(I don't think there is a thread on this, but I apologise if there has been - the only other sports I have seen talked about in any depth are US football and baseball.)
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Old 10-30-09, 10:26
R.0.t.O R.0.t.O is offline
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Originally Posted by luckyboy View Post
Just wanted to hear some people's opinions on this. I mean, we have all heard of two big Spanish teams being linked to OP, and team/s in Italy with their masses of legal drugs. But how widespread do people think it is in football/soccer? Try as I might, I can't imagine Fulham or Wigan players injecting themselves with whatever before a match.
Logic would suggest that they are running big programmes. The returns (or often rather the consequences of failure) are so enormous for individuals and teams that any professionally run club will be looking for every possible marginal gain. A club like Hull City will lose tens of millions if they're relegated; they've invested heavily to try to secure the returns of the EPL and could easily be in a position where the whole organisation folds if they lose out on anticipated income. Or take one of the top clubs, Liverpool: they're hugely reliant on a few key players - a huge organisation reliant on the fitness of a handful athletes to secure Champions' League positions and thereby service debt. It is only logical that you'd look for every marginal gain, whether it's improving players' endurance of the length of a match, or their ability to recover to play again in back-to-back matches, or their ability to recover from long-term injuries.

Then imagine how much easier it is to dope for a footballer than for a cyclist. Footballers have a permanent base, with on-site medical facilities and their own security systems. You only leave the base for single-day trips for away games. It's the direct opposite of cycling teams which have no permanent base or infrastructure and have to drag themselves around Europe and stay in hotels most of the year. Think of how many cycling doping cases have broken simply because of border controls (Festina, Rumsas) or how many more rumours stem from suspicious junk dumped at hotels, or because riders/teams don't have their own infrastructure and have to use someone else's (Fuentes, Vienna, Freiburg).
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Old 10-30-09, 12:05
stephen-48 stephen-48 is offline
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Just a couple of comments. During one of the World Cups back in the early 1980s a Scottish player got caught taking amphetamines. The issue of the teams knowing when the testers are going to turn up has been cited a number of times in the media. Finally I think someone mentioned tennis. I believe that McEnroe has stated that he was given steroids over a number of years in the 1980s, but that they were legal at the time!
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Old 10-30-09, 12:07
keen_but_slow keen_but_slow is offline
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Prolonged exposure to lactate impairs your hand-eye coordination, and premiership players cover 10km per game, much of that is running quite hard. They've every reason to dope.

Arsene Wenger once commented that they (Arsenal) were seeing some strange blood values in the pre-signing medicals when they got players from Spain but that they normalised once at the club. You can probably find the exact quotation online.

Rugby, on the other hand, is rife with anabolic steroids. The players are getting so strong that there is an annual symposium to study the changing injury patterns because they way it's going, people will start getting killed.
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Old 10-30-09, 12:27
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poupou poupou is offline
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Football use blood manipulation. EPO was used in first by Italian clubs (thanks Ferrari, Cechini,...) when they began to beat all team in the last 20mn, their players were much more fresher than their opponents. Spaniard followed then English and finally all other countries.
To be skilled without physical means is nothing in football. For exemple Ronaldhinho is one of the top 3 skilled, but he don't play because of his lack of training.
Playing 2 times a week requiers a good recovering, so a need to finish a game fresher.

There is much more EPO produced than used by medical staff. All riders of the world could never use that black EPO.
Who are using it? Ski-runner are few like many other sports. Only football has enough pro player to afford a such comsumption.
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Old 10-30-09, 13:42
keen_but_slow keen_but_slow is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by poupou View Post
Football use blood manipulation. EPO was used in first by Italian clubs (thanks Ferrari, Cechini,...) when they began to beat all team in the last 20mn, their players were much more fresher than their opponents.
After the EPO test came in, Italy went a few years without getting a team into the last 16 of the Champions League. Probably coincidence.
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Old 10-30-09, 17:51
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goggalor goggalor is offline
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Originally Posted by blackcat View Post
Now, there are certain players, who may benefit. IE. A tennis player, who uses their speed as a weapon.
Anyone thinking the same as me?


Some interesting stories from Steroid Nation:

"Reports suggest soccer star Ronaldo's early steroid use led to current knee injuries":
http://grg51.typepad.com/steroid_nat...s-of-socc.html

"Soccer great Pele wants soccer drug-cheat Maradona stripped of medals":
http://grg51.typepad.com/steroid_nat...-great-pe.html


Also, a somewhat interesting fact on Argentine superstar Lionel Messi:

"His sinuous style of play is a product of his low centre of gravity, something that may have been affected by the growth-hormone deficiency from which he suffered as a child. He was diagnosed at 11 and he needed extensive and expensive treatment to get him through his adolescent development and 500 a month was too much for a family from a modest background in Rosario.

Without the treatment we would never have heard of Messi. Newell's Old Boys helped out but when they decided they could not afford it, Barcelona stepped in. He was 13 then and within three years he was in the first team."

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/sport/foo...Barcelona.html

(PS: I'm not calling Messi a cheat, just found it interesting.)
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Old 10-30-09, 18:51
podilato podilato is offline
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I think that with the way sports are now we have to abandon the "innocent until proven guilty" philosophy and assume that something is going on.

Are we to assume that doping occurs in things like amateur cycling, cross country skiing and biathlon but not football or tennis?

Modern footballers are running almost 10 kms a match and they are playing at least 50+ games for their clubs and also in some years playing for their national teams as well.

In tennis, you see games where the players are playing just as hard after 4 hours. When Nadal started winning at around 18 he certainly didn't look 18.
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Old 10-30-09, 19:16
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Escarabajo Escarabajo is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by goggalor View Post
...
"His sinuous style of play is a product of his low centre of gravity, something that may have been affected by the growth-hormone deficiency from which he suffered as a child. He was diagnosed at 11 and he needed extensive and expensive treatment to get him through his adolescent development and 500 a month was too much for a family from a modest background in Rosario.

Without the treatment we would never have heard of Messi. Newell's Old Boys helped out but when they decided they could not afford it, Barcelona stepped in. He was 13 then and within three years he was in the first team."

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/sport/foo...Barcelona.html

(PS: I'm not calling Messi a cheat, just found it interesting.)
Let's call it a TUE.
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  #10  
Old 10-30-09, 13:35
Frosty Frosty is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by keen_but_slow View Post
Prolonged exposure to lactate impairs your hand-eye coordination, and premiership players cover 10km per game, much of that is running quite hard. They've every reason to dope.

Arsene Wenger once commented that they (Arsenal) were seeing some strange blood values in the pre-signing medicals when they got players from Spain but that they normalised once at the club. You can probably find the exact quotation online.
Here you go

http://news.bbc.co.uk/sport1/hi/football/3726928.stm
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