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  #11  
Old 11-06-12, 12:07
The Gnome The Gnome is offline
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I have a pair of Northwave boots...they work just fine til the snow gets here in Vermont...no problems riding even abit below freezing point...not crazy money either...if you should get these I would advise going a size larger than you usually take...I got mine in proper size and abit too tight ect...

http://www.probikekit.com/us/northwa...FYKK4AodH2cATA

Last edited by The Gnome; 11-06-12 at 12:15.
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  #12  
Old 11-06-12, 12:30
fat_boy_fat fat_boy_fat is offline
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Apart of keeping the torso warm, I noticed two important things:

The more room your feet have, the warmer it is, that’s right, but it is also vital to loosen the straps a little bit – quite inconvenient, when pedaling harder or sprinting, but the straps can block blood circulation. I rarely care in summer, but in winter, it’s hell.

Removing inner soles to gain space inside the shoe is a bad idea. That brings your foot in contact with parts of the shoe, that might have cooled down due to chilling wind effects or contact to the ground, especially the cleat area. I exchange soles in winter and use some with an aluminium foil bottom and lamb wool on top. That is quite a good insulation and they are not as thick as the usual soles.

Apart of that, winter boots are a good investment, neoprene booties (3 mm) are too.

And when I’m grown up, I buy me a pair of these:
http://www.heat-systems.de/index.php?project=schwarzRC (German)
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Last edited by fat_boy_fat; 11-06-12 at 12:33.
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  #13  
Old 11-07-12, 04:05
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Quote:
Originally Posted by twothirds View Post
What Scorpius said......
+1

As an old stockman always told me, "when your feet are cold, put a ruddy hat on!!!"

Works a treat, as 20% of heat-loss is through the skull/face area, also the neck is a source of significant heat loss at any decent cycling speeds.

I use a thin (1mm) neoprene skull-cap under the helmet, and a thick polar-fleece neck baffle that I can pull up and hook onto the helmet adjuster at the back, and then pulll up over my mouth, nose and ears.
The baffle also helps trapping moisture and warmth so the air you breathe in is not doing a dry-freeze job on your lungs.... helps a lot in keeping the body's core temps up.

I use standard neoprene booties with wool socks, shoes a bit looser than summer, and have no problems, even after a long descent at 70km/h, with one morning recently at -5C air temps.... (Madrid Sierra, >1100 metres)
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  #14  
Old 11-14-12, 14:17
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Parrot23 Parrot23 is offline
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Thanks, folks, for all the ideas. Appreciated!

My upper body is fine (toasty warm; I just make sure the cycling jacket and wind vest have a good/moveable zipper to adjust temp on the fly). Nalini Pike jacket works for me. But per the "unbroken chain of warmth from torso to feet" comment, I needed warmer tights. That helped. Thanks.

Vasoldilation comment was convincing. Here I don't think humans were meant or evolved to seated exertion, because as soon as I stand on the pedals or get off the bike to stand, the feet warm up very FAST. Weight bearing distributes the blood in feet; spinning them like an eggbeater, when conditions are slightly cold, removes the blood from feet fast to muscles, I'm thinking.

Yes, tocque/head covering is key. Using Look Keo pedals (carbon), so metallic cleats not a big problem. Also, very loose shoe straps helped. Thanks.

Reversed my thinking to what is too hot to wear in shoes in summer: memory foam shoe insoles are very hot, and dirt cheap acrylic socks (re even Dollar store socks). Impossible to wear in summer! So I've been using both.

Below zero will try chemical foot warmers, one per shoe,and winter shoe suggestions if I continue out-of-season riding.

Last edited by Parrot23; 11-14-12 at 14:41.
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  #15  
Old 11-14-12, 19:49
richwagmn richwagmn is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GreasyMonkey View Post
+1

As an old stockman always told me, "when your feet are cold, put a ruddy hat on!!!"

Works a treat, as 20% of heat-loss is through the skull/face area, also the neck is a source of significant heat loss at any decent cycling speeds.

I use a thin (1mm) neoprene skull-cap under the helmet, and a thick polar-fleece neck baffle that I can pull up and hook onto the helmet adjuster at the back, and then pulll up over my mouth, nose and ears.
The baffle also helps trapping moisture and warmth so the air you breathe in is not doing a dry-freeze job on your lungs.... helps a lot in keeping the body's core temps up.

I use standard neoprene booties with wool socks, shoes a bit looser than summer, and have no problems, even after a long descent at 70km/h, with one morning recently at -5C air temps.... (Madrid Sierra, >1100 metres)
So dump the summer socks then? I sort of assumed the neoprene booties would do enough for insulation by themselves (which they obviously don't).
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  #16  
Old 11-15-12, 01:36
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Giuseppe Magnetico Giuseppe Magnetico is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by richwagmn View Post
So dump the summer socks then? I sort of assumed the neoprene booties would do enough for insulation by themselves (which they obviously don't).
Rich, you know I'm from your neck of the woods, most people here have no idea about the cold in MN. I used neoprene booties for years until I got proper winter boots. The problem with Neoprene is that it doesn't breathe, so once you get to a certain temp the condensation from your feet sweating starts to freeze, then it's quickly downhill. I used to really push it too, WBL to Stillwater and back,3 hours max for me in the neoprene. I can be out all day in sub-freezing temps with the Lake boots and be totally fine.
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  #17  
Old 11-15-12, 22:48
winkybiker winkybiker is offline
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I read the thermometer before deciding. Here's my scale if it is below about 12 degrees...

10 degrees to 12 degrees: Regular short kit. Maybe some arm-warmers and/or light gilet if it isn't going to get any warmer during the day. No gloves or fingerless gloves.

5 degrees to 10 degrees: Short bibs, lightweight shoe covers, wicking L/S baselayer, S/S jersey (or LS jersey and lightweight gilet). Long gloves, but fairly light.

0 degrees to 5 degrees (like this morning): Long (non-padded) bibs (PI Amfib, usually) and padded undershorts or short bibs underneath, L/S wicking baselayer, S/S jersey, heavier gilet. Warm gloves. Medium-weight shoe covers. Maybe a light headband for the ears on the first descent. I always ditch it early, though - or I get too hot. I can cope with short bibs down to about 2 or 3 degrees if I know it will be warming up later.

-5 to zero degrees: As above but neoprene shoe covers and lobster-mit type very warm gloves. Headband to stop the ears getting cold.

If it is raining I tend to wear much the same, but slightly warmer for any given temperature. I just f*&^ing HATE rain shells (too flappy and sweaty). It's only water, people. The way I figure, it washes right off. I do have a heavy-weight thermal cycling jacket that is fairly waterproof that I will sometimes wear if it is very wet and below 5 degrees - or if it is snowing.
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  #18  
Old 11-15-12, 22:58
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Giuseppe Magnetico View Post
There comes a point in temperature where booties and shoe covers just don't cut it. If you're willing to make the investment you need proper winter boots. I've tried Sidi and Gaerne boots in the past, but have settled on Lake. The MXZ302 is the warmest winter cycling boot on the market. I've had mine for more than 10 seasons now. They are plenty warm down to -15C wearing just thin wool socks.

http://www.lakecycling.com/footwear.html
Isn't Lake out of business? What is the best that is available?

My usual rule is that if it is below 35F (2C) I do something other than riding.
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  #19  
Old 11-16-12, 01:37
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Giuseppe Magnetico Giuseppe Magnetico is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BroDeal View Post
Isn't Lake out of business? What is the best that is available?

My usual rule is that if it is below 35F (2C) I do something other than riding.
Lake was going through some kind of problem, I don't know the details on, but the indicator was no contact info on their website. Asked around, somebody mentioned they were changing ownership. All I know is that they're back and the contact list is complete. http://www.lakecycling.com/contact.html

I used to go indoors at about that same temp, on rollers for years, until I figured out how to stay warm on the bike. I almost relish going out in blizzard conditions when the streets are empty. That is soooooo much fun!!

Other boot I like is the 45 NRTH Wölvhammer. QBP was the distro for Lake for many years and it looks like they keyed of their design for this one. 45 NRTH is another Q brand that supports the fat bike and adventure crowd. Looks like the Lake boot on steroids.

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Last edited by Giuseppe Magnetico; 11-16-12 at 02:03.
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  #20  
Old 11-16-12, 02:11
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Parrot23 Parrot23 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Giuseppe Magnetico View Post
The problem with Neoprene is that it doesn't breathe, so once you get to a certain temp the condensation from your feet sweating starts to freeze, then it's quickly downhill.
Ha, ha, that seems to be my prob! Toasty feet for 30-40 mins, then it's downhill to a lower operating temp. It's the dampness that develops at the very front of the shoe. My boot covers now are non-neoprene. Slightly better.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Giuseppe Magnetico View Post
...until I figured out how to stay warm on the bike.
Yeah, a bit of a detective game. Experiment a bit here, a bit there. Didn't think I could ride around zero or below before. Now I can...just! Great advice on boots. Thanks.

Quote:
Originally Posted by winkybiker View Post
I just f*&^ing HATE rain shells (too flappy and sweaty).
Long sleeve waterproof or repellent jackets don't work for me. Flap, flap, etc. and I find the dedicated insulated cycling jackets far more wind repellent in any case. Sleeveless windvests do, but under other stuff when colder, because they're unobtrusive. I do an out and back course: climbing out to summit, descending back. I add the windvest inside on the way back.

Also, on my break at the top, I take as much off as I can, LOL, reverse sauna style. Turn the sleeves of Nalini Pike jacket and arm warmers inside out to dry out for 5-10mins. The tradeoff works: sure I get colder for a bit as it's windy at the top, but advantage is it dries clothes fast and this help before starting the fast descent. Windchill is terrible when wet. Dampness is what kills when cold. Just read the SAS survival guides, etc. These guys NEVER bed down near a stream or in a damp ditch. Canadian speaking here.

Last edited by Parrot23; 11-16-12 at 02:29.
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