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  #191  
Old 11-21-12, 19:12
winkybiker winkybiker is offline
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Originally Posted by Arnout View Post
Agreed. I think a bell is a very polite way of asking "can I pass" instead of the shouting approach.
Or is it just saying "Get out of my way, slow-poke!"? I have a few sections of shared-use footpath on my commute. They are where the most unpredictable behaviour occurs. Off-leash dogs, dogs on long leashes, speeding e-bikes (bells continuously dinging, of course), kids on big-wheels/scooters/coast-bikes, gaggles of incessantly gabbing runners, texters, iPodders etc etc... No way a bell would make any of this consistently better or more predictable. I simply assume that everybody is completely unpredictable, and ride at an appropriate speed, such that I could safely avoid them no matter what they do.

One area in particular where the bell seems a bit counter-productive is on the shared use lane on the bridge. The lane is wide enough for cyclist overtaking, if each cyclist holds their line pretty well, but it can be very intimidating for inexperienced cyclists. If a cyclist in front of me is not "stable", I'll just wait. Might hold me up for a minute-or-so. No big deal. But I do not sense that bell-ringers have any such patience. Just ringing the bell can put stress on people trying to get out of the way and cause problems where room is tight. Ringing a bell also tends to make pedestrians think that they are in the way - their reaction is sometimes to jump sideways.

Patience is the key. Bells, not so much.

Last edited by winkybiker; 11-21-12 at 19:13. Reason: typo
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  #192  
Old 11-22-12, 04:23
Burnette Burnette is offline
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Default Stop Doing It If Fear Trumps Fun

To the OP, I didn't read all the posts/argumnets, but did read all of your first post and the words "I'm scared" kinda says it all. If the fear factor is high and you have multiple bad experiences frequently, give it a rest for awhile.
Living in a rural area and having so many great rides in a row, the enjoyment and fittness I recieve far out weighs any fear I have. Sure, I get some too close passes, a few shouts of encouragement to remove myself from the road (Ha!), but the majority of time my rides are issue free.
My choice to ride would change if I didn't enjoy the majority of my rides and if I had too many close calls. Not stuff in the news or club ride stories, but bad things that actually happened to me would be what would sway me to stop.
Everybody's threat level is different, you have to determine for yourself if the threat is too great for you. Stop riding and ask yourself if you miss it. If you do, start riding again and ask yourself after every ride this, was the issues you had for that days ride enough to make you stop. If not, ride again and repeat the question.
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  #193  
Old 11-22-12, 10:49
Aapjes Aapjes is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by winkybiker View Post
Or is it just saying "Get out of my way, slow-poke!"? I have a few sections of shared-use footpath on my commute. They are where the most unpredictable behaviour occurs. Off-leash dogs, dogs on long leashes, speeding e-bikes (bells continuously dinging, of course), kids on big-wheels/scooters/coast-bikes, gaggles of incessantly gabbing runners, texters, iPodders etc etc... No way a bell would make any of this consistently better or more predictable. I simply assume that everybody is completely unpredictable, and ride at an appropriate speed, such that I could safely avoid them no matter what they do.

One area in particular where the bell seems a bit counter-productive is on the shared use lane on the bridge. The lane is wide enough for cyclist overtaking, if each cyclist holds their line pretty well, but it can be very intimidating for inexperienced cyclists. If a cyclist in front of me is not "stable", I'll just wait. Might hold me up for a minute-or-so. No big deal. But I do not sense that bell-ringers have any such patience. Just ringing the bell can put stress on people trying to get out of the way and cause problems where room is tight. Ringing a bell also tends to make pedestrians think that they are in the way - their reaction is sometimes to jump sideways.

Patience is the key. Bells, not so much.
Actually I do many of the same things you do. I don't just ring my bell indiscriminately, but I do think that there are many situations where the bell is the best option.

It seems to me that you are not actually arguing against the bell, but misuse of it. However, this isn't caused by the bell, but by a lack of understanding of how to behave in traffic. Without a bell, the people you complain about would still misbehave, just without warning anyone.

As for pedestrians and cyclists getting jumpy at the ring of a bell, this is exactly why I have a very loud bell that I can ring from a long distance, so people have plenty of time to do something stupid and recover. As for the added stress, I won't take the blame when people are unable to function in traffic, given the fact that the ring of a bell is only 1 of many stress-inducers in traffic and hardly the most serious.
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  #194  
Old 11-22-12, 10:58
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Arnout Arnout is offline
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I could not agree more with the message of Aapjes.
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  #195  
Old 11-22-12, 17:00
winkybiker winkybiker is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Aapjes View Post
It seems to me that you are not actually arguing against the bell, but misuse of it.
That's probably right, but in my mind at least, the sound of a bike bell always evokes the image of someone who thinks they have right-of-way and that the unwashed masses should part to allow them through. When overtaking, one has no such right-of-way. It seems (to me) arrogant for people to assume it.

Just as the car horn has been used so consistently to send the message "f#*& off!" that it scarcely has any other useful purpose, the the bike bell has been used so often to say "Scatter from my path you unworthy peons - Coming through! Don't make me touch my brakes!", that in my mind at least, it has little other meaning.
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  #196  
Old 11-23-12, 19:49
silverrocket silverrocket is offline
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I actually enjoy high density traffic because I find it exciting. It even gives me a bit of a race feel in having to be aware of so many vehicles moving around me. I also don't mind the high-speed roads, since they are usually wide open enough that I can be seen, and people where I live are quite tolerant of cyclists on open roads. My only concern is the moderate-speed, moderate traffic roads, where cyclists get lost in the shuffle, yet can't keep up to the traffic.

I also live in the only province in Canada that until just this year allowed heavily tinted side-windows of vehicles that prevent you from see where the driver is looking, and if he even see me. They changed the law this year (because the cops couldn't see if people had their seatbelts on), but there are still many, many cars out there with the windows already tinted almost black.
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  #197  
Old 11-25-12, 03:33
Sanitiser Sanitiser is offline
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Quote:
Police are seeking information after a female cyclist was slapped on the bottom by a man in a car, causing her to lose control of her bike and break her collarbone.

Read more: http://www.theage.com.au/victoria/cy...#ixzz2DCZHcDEk
With **** like this- a little bit.
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  #198  
Old 11-27-12, 00:03
winkybiker winkybiker is offline
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Originally Posted by Sanitiser View Post
With **** like this- a little bit.
Wow. But that is Australian motorists for you. The only place where I have had cars play "chicken, as well as consistent abuse and missiles directed at me whilst riding. Thankfully, I've long since left.
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  #199  
Old 11-27-12, 06:59
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42x16ss 42x16ss is offline
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This is why Australia produces so many sprinters. If you can't put a good sprint on in an emergency you'll get flattened!
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  #200  
Old 11-27-12, 14:15
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FignonLeGrand FignonLeGrand is offline
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People like this are scary

http://www.express.co.uk/posts/view/...ource=outbrain
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