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  #31  
Old 05-18-10, 07:31
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Originally Posted by Barracuda View Post
Are you serious ??!!?? On this years Tour down under community ride I saw a rider on a perfectly flat road go A over T on a train line and split head clean open. ROAD ID very handy then i would assume!!
Well... then it wasn't perfectly flat... I didn't see it but maybe that guy just wasn't paying attention, come on; a large bunch of people riding together, bound to end in trouble! And... they must've gone relatively fast for that to happen (he was wearing a helmet, right?)

Also... I know there's a risk in moving out in trafic. But, then pedestrians might as well wear a tag too...
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  #32  
Old 05-18-10, 07:37
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ElChingon ElChingon is offline
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I'd like to know when was the last time anyone on Earth found a person by the roadside and couldn't figure out to just call 911 or whatever the number is in your part of the world and get the person to a hospital or medical place? No, instead they'll first try to identify you before carting you off to the hospital right?

Remember if they find your body on some road side most likely you will be taken to the nearest hospital/clinic/doctor/etc. and if they can't fix you up then it will be up to the coroner to figure out who you are. If you owe money they will identify you pretty quick I guarantee it hospital or coroner, if you don't owe money then you should consider taking out a big loan, assuming you want to be identified. I'm sure there's some people who need to have some special medical case and they carry a bracelet or other to identify that already.

Then again if you carry a fake ID you might also get out of a big hospital bill?
I wonder if Road ID will sell another "Levi Leipheimer" bracelet to me?
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  #33  
Old 05-18-10, 13:47
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I'd like to know when was the last time anyone on Earth found a person by the roadside and couldn't figure out to just call 911 or whatever the number is in your part of the world and get the person to a hospital or medical place? No, instead they'll first try to identify you before carting you off to the hospital right?
If after reading this thread you think it is for the person who finds you to call home then you shouldn't be riding a bike.
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Old 05-18-10, 14:45
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I... think what ElChingon meant was that people witnessing a bad crash hopefully would bring a person to the hospital and then worry about the identification and calling-home business...
Anyway... where do you people live if you can't even go for an ordinary bike-ride without having to worry that "I might be run down or I might have a bad crash!"?
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In Italy when you need a coffee you need the right barista, so you need to teach Chris [Juul Jensen] how to make the right coffee.
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  #35  
Old 05-18-10, 16:06
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Originally Posted by RedheadDane View Post
I... think what ElChingon meant was that people witnessing a bad crash hopefully would bring a person to the hospital and then worry about the identification and calling-home business...
And who said anything different. Hence my reply.

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Anyway... where do you people live if you can't even go for an ordinary bike-ride without having to worry that "I might be run down or I might have a bad crash!"?
Quote:
There was a 21% increase in the number of bicyslists injured in 2008, totaling 52,000.
http://www.edgarsnyder.com/bicycle/a...09%26spell%3D1

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Denmark has a high incidence of cyclist traffic. Every year, approximately 60 cyclists are killed and 2000 injured on Danish roads and cyclists remain a high-risk group.
http://www.esafetysupport.org/en/esa...l/denmark_.htm

Why do you carry your phone or wallet with you or your card?
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  #36  
Old 05-18-10, 16:18
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1: You wrote as if (s)he'd written that the person who witnessed a crash would do the calling... but I suppose you could bring someone to the hospital and let them (or the police...) do the calling

2: Yes! There are hazards of moving out into trafic... but... there are also hazards if you walk... or even drive your car. The trick is: be carefull! If you see a right-turning truck keep back until you're 200% sure it has seen you or even better; has made its turn!

3: Well... mostly when I'm riding my bike I'm going to school... and honestly; with a rucksack packed with what feels like a few kilos worth of books a phone and a wallet doesn't make much difference!
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In Italy when you need a coffee you need the right barista, so you need to teach Chris [Juul Jensen] how to make the right coffee.
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  #37  
Old 05-30-10, 23:10
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I think those who buy it consider it like a fictional safety blanket as the info you list on it is rather un-helpfull, they have and e-mail address? Home phone, address, name, emergency contact. Which one of these do you really want on there if you just found someone? I think you're better off just having 911 listed on there just in case the person who found you is questioning who to call. Most people's family will thank you for calling 911 and not them, unless they are in the ambulance business or own a personal always ready helicopter to go pick you up ASAP.

I won't mind if they call me "hey you" while they wait for the ambulance to come pick me up. People need to get things in perspective. Then again if you do find an arm or leg with the ROAD ID on it you'll know where to send the appendage to if the address is listed. Yes listing any allergies/allergic meds on it is helpful for those who have it, then again you probably have such a bracelet already, right?
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  #38  
Old 05-31-10, 01:07
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There are some pretty callous and unimaginative responses on this thread. If you have medical issues or allergies, then access to this information can be pretty vital at the hospital. And you can put anything you want on your bracelet. It doesn't have to be your address; it can be your blood type (which can save valuable time if you're losing a lot of blood and unconscious).

As for pedestrians being at risk—that's a pretty naïve comment, but if you're allergic to penicillin, you probably wear a similar bracelet just in case. I've visited Copenhagen; it's a beautiful city. But in an afternoon's stroll around town, I witnessed one cyclist hitting a car and another crashing with a pedestrian. Fortunately, no one was hurt in either case, but to say that you're not at risk is ridiculous.

If you think this kind of easily accessible information is a silly idea, don't get one. When I'm out riding on my own—often far from home—it seems to me that being able to communicate medical information to a prospective emergency health provider isn't such a bad idea. Do I expect to crash? No. Am I aware that even the best and most careful cyclists can be involved in a crash? Yes.
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  #39  
Old 05-31-10, 07:10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Steampunk View Post
There are some pretty callous and unimaginative responses on this thread. If you have medical issues or allergies, then access to this information can be pretty vital at the hospital. And you can put anything you want on your bracelet. It doesn't have to be your address; it can be your blood type (which can save valuable time if you're losing a lot of blood and unconscious).

As for pedestrians being at risk—that's a pretty naïve comment, but if you're allergic to penicillin, you probably wear a similar bracelet just in case. I've visited Copenhagen; it's a beautiful city. But in an afternoon's stroll around town, I witnessed one cyclist hitting a car and another crashing with a pedestrian. Fortunately, no one was hurt in either case, but to say that you're not at risk is ridiculous.

If you think this kind of easily accessible information is a silly idea, don't get one. When I'm out riding on my own—often far from home—it seems to me that being able to communicate medical information to a prospective emergency health provider isn't such a bad idea. Do I expect to crash? No. Am I aware that even the best and most careful cyclists can be involved in a crash? Yes.
I'm sure it's been said earlier but how about putting this info along side your spare tube? That and a cell number to a concerned party would do the same thing and not spend money on a useless, overpromoted and overpriced bracelet. Don't we have enough jewelry already, fans?
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  #40  
Old 01-05-13, 07:22
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Some one did say you can put anything on those bracelets.

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