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  #41  
Old 01-05-13, 17:08
avanti avanti is offline
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My former bike club used to participate in a Xmas bike giveaway to kids. This was in cooperation with our local professional fire dept. A few years ago we showed a rider ID bracelet to the firemen; none knew what is was!

They said they leave all identification and medical issues to the hospital except for first aid (or to the police in the case of a road death).

I carry an old DL, medical insurance card, and list of contacts when I'm riding.

Edit: I also carry a cell phone with ICE numbers. I have not checked my new location but in my old one the firemen/paramedics also took any crashed bikes backto their station.

Last edited by avanti; 01-05-13 at 23:46.
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  #42  
Old 01-05-13, 22:47
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ElChingon ElChingon is offline
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Originally Posted by avanti View Post
My former bike club used to participate in a Xmas bike giveaway to kids. This was in cooperation with our local professional fire dept. A few years ago we showed a rider ID bracelet to the firemen; none knew what is was!

They said they leave all identification and medical issues to the hospital except for first aid (or to the police in the case of a road death).

I carry an old DL, medical insurance card, and list of contacts when I'm riding.
They left out that they pretty much totally disrobe you and place your shredded up clothes in a bag which may or may not be kept/traced to you later so your DL, etc may never see the light of day again after that.
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  #43  
Old 01-06-13, 16:54
winkybiker winkybiker is offline
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I tried all the arguments with my wife. I insisted that her getting early notification of my demise didn't really make things any better. I argued that whoever found my shattered body should seek medical aid as a priority before letting her know. I explained that I had no pre-existing condition that a first-aider/responder/trauma surgeon needed to know about. All of it. Made no difference.

She simply insisted that she would be less stressed believing that she would be able to be quickly notified if I was killed or injured. I couldn't argue with that logic. So I ride with a Road I.D. Not for me...for her.
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  #44  
Old 01-07-13, 06:33
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Originally Posted by winkybiker View Post
I tried all the arguments with my wife. I insisted that her getting early notification of my demise didn't really make things any better. I argued that whoever found my shattered body should seek medical aid as a priority before letting her know. I explained that I had no pre-existing condition that a first-aider/responder/trauma surgeon needed to know about. All of it. Made no difference.

She simply insisted that she would be less stressed believing that she would be able to be quickly notified if I was killed or injured. I couldn't argue with that logic. So I ride with a Road I.D. Not for me...for her.
"Happy Wife, Happy Life", eh?


I thought the whole ID thing was for the paramedics anyway. They won't be interested in your bike, so won't go through your saddle bag, or look for little tags.
They won't be going through your pockets or wallets or through your phone numbers either - not til long after you've already been carted to hospital, and even then your PIN will probably prevent them accessing your phone... (if it's not stolen by an onlooker, along with your wallet)
They will, however, check for medic alert style bracelets and necklets, and are fully aware of the helmet emergency ID tags. These will all be found during the initial assessment/checkover.

Like Winkybiker, mine was given to me by my family and contains my name, emergency contact info (name & number) along with my blood type. The last one is the most important for me, but the second is the most important for the family - saves them having to go through the whole "well, he hasn't come back yet, wait, worry, wait, worry, better check with hospitals, etc..." palaver and stress...
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  #45  
Old 01-07-13, 14:33
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Originally Posted by ElChingon View Post
They left out that they pretty much totally disrobe you and place your shredded up clothes in a bag which may or may not be kept/traced to you later so your DL, etc may never see the light of day again after that.
Thought I posted this but..

Name, DOB, SSN and blood type tattooed right above heart, left side of chest..like said above, they make you nekid, if they gotta shock you or do CPR, that's where they go.

Lots of military guys do this.

Last edited by Bustedknuckle; 01-07-13 at 14:37.
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  #46  
Old 01-08-13, 21:27
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StyrbjornSterki StyrbjornSterki is offline
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It is a wise practice, IMHO, because anyone who spends a significant portion of their life road cycling is subject to fall victim to someone else's accident. I just don't fancy the expense or the execution.

There isn't much information that your RoadID could provide that would affect how the EMTs/paramedics will treat you, unless you have an especially rare medical condition or allergy. Blood type in particular is purely eyewash because the protocol is to type and crossmatch before administering it. EMTs/Paramedics do not carry blood (it is too scarce and too perishable), much less administer it, and no competent medical professional will trust what is printed on your ID, regardless. If your condition is so critical that they cannot wait for for lab results, they administer O-neg rather than trust even what you might say, provided you are conscious, or even what is tattooed on your chest (have you never seen a misspelt tattoo?).

I have a couple of rare drug allergies, and an unusual medical condition that could affect diagnosis, so I wear a Medic Alert necklace. But that information only would be beneficial if I were uncommunicative for a lengthy period and no Next-of-Kin was available.

STODRR's example of surgically-implanted steel is an excellent point (all mine are titanium, which is non-magnetic). Depending on your injuries, that is something the treating physician might need to know immediately (but, again, not the EMTs/Paramedics).

So for the typical "No Known Allergies" cyclist lacking a steel plate in their head, the primary benefit of the RoadID would be in the providing of NOK information, or long-term treatment information (which probably wouldn't be necessary if a NOK were available), or the existence of your "living will" or advanced medical care directive. If you are unconscious and no NOK or AMCD is available, doctors always will assume that you would consent to being treated as they see fit.

When I cycle, I leave the smartphone at home and carry a small clamshell mobile phone with an ICE number programmed into it. But it cannot be relied upon to remain serviceable after a severe crash so I also carry an emergency ID of my own manufacture, kept along with the mobile inside of a snack-sized (3x6"/8x16cm) ziplock plastic bag in the back pocket of my jersey.

If you think your bloodied and shredded clothes are summarily discarded by hospital staff, you are mistaken. One of the EMTs' duties after the drop-off is made is to transfer any personal effects to hospital staff, who will search them, specifically looking for identity documents. So the fact I don't wear my RoadID-I-Y around my wrist or neck is inconsequential.

But I cannot justify the expense (or, to a lesser degree, the lack of timeliness) of a RoadID because I can create an equivalent document myself with a computer, a printer, and a trip to the nearest business offering laminating service. Your address can change, the identity of your NOK can change, your NOK can change telephone numbers, or you might change insurors or insurance policy numbers, any of which would mean your RoadID is "out of date."

OTOH, with my RoadID-I-Y, if any of my information should change, it's two minutes at my PC, 10 minutes to the neighborhood copy centre, the price of a pint of Guinness later and, voilą!, I have a reasonably durable identification document that meets my primary emergency medical information needs and is suitable for carry in a bicycle jersey pocket. Mine is about 2x4" (5x10cm), duplex printed in a 10-pt font, and is more than large enough as is, but I can make it as large the as the information I deem necessary should require.
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  #47  
Old 01-09-13, 12:09
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bustedknuckle View Post
Thought I posted this but..

Name, DOB, SSN and blood type tattooed right above heart, left side of chest..like said above, they make you nekid, if they gotta shock you or do CPR, that's where they go.

Lots of military guys do this.
And in other news...epidemic of identify theft sweeps through military personnel posted to locations near public beaches.
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Last edited by BroDeal; 01-27-13 at 22:02.
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  #48  
Old 01-27-13, 21:48
STODRR STODRR is offline
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This weekend my riding buddy was out in the moutians by himself. He remembers trying to figure time to meet his wife then waking up in an ambulance. The guy that found him on the side of the road (hit and run) called 911 then called his wife. He got his number off his road ID on his wrist.

Yes that person could have looked through his wallet (I don't want somebody going thru my wallet), or could have looked in his phone assuming it was not locked and he had the number identified as wife and not the name like I do.
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  #49  
Old 01-28-13, 07:00
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Originally Posted by STODRR View Post
This weekend my riding buddy was out in the moutians by himself. He remembers trying to figure time to meet his wife then waking up in an ambulance. The guy that found him on the side of the road (hit and run) called 911 then called his wife. He got his number off his road ID on his wrist.

Yes that person could have looked through his wallet (I don't want somebody going thru my wallet), or could have looked in his phone assuming it was not locked and he had the number identified as wife and not the name like I do.

Thanks RoadID employee!

I have some experience in this area. Emergency personnel, on average, do not know what RoadID is, nor are they looking. Their priorities were not, for me, figuring that stuff out. They got me to a hospital.

In my case the matter was urgent clothes were cut off and discarded. I can't understand why they would mess around with clothes in an urgent situation. Your stuff gets transferred to the hospital where they will attempt to sort out who you are if you are not conscious. I got my wallet back, with all the cash no problem.
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  #50  
Old 01-28-13, 14:07
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Thanks RoadID employee!

I have some experience in this area. Emergency personnel, on average, do not know what RoadID is, nor are they looking. Their priorities were not, for me, figuring that stuff out. They got me to a hospital.

In my case the matter was urgent clothes were cut off and discarded. I can't understand why they would mess around with clothes in an urgent situation. Your stuff gets transferred to the hospital where they will attempt to sort out who you are if you are not conscious. I got my wallet back, with all the cash no problem.
Me too. I was in the hospital as 'John Doe' until the emergency RM Doc recognized me. I had a concussion, so couldn't help. Clothes cut off(broken back), into a plastic bag.
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