Go Back   CyclingNews Forum > Road > The Clinic

The Clinic The Clinic is the only place on Cyclingnews where you can discuss doping-related issues. Ask questions, discuss positives or improvements to procedures.

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #831  
Old 01-06-13, 15:53
the sceptic's Avatar
the sceptic the sceptic is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Posts: 2,884
Default

Russians have been super strong lately in biathlon too. Definitely gearing up for the home olympics.
Reply With Quote
  #832  
Old 01-06-13, 20:22
Cloxxki Cloxxki is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Posts: 1,908
Default

In women's XC, it seems that athletes go from finishing a stage to having a chat about random stuff without transition. Don't they need a breather or something? It's XC for crying out loud! The men either try harder, or have it harder.
It seems we used to see more people looking like dying after the finish line. Could just be me...
Reply With Quote
  #833  
Old 01-08-13, 09:05
Armchaircyclist Armchaircyclist is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Posts: 114
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Cloxxki View Post
Di Centa seems to be more than fit right now. Outstanding skiing for a 40-year-old. From reports he seems quite well versed in the Italian School of EPO. EPO Z perhaps until the test for it arrives? Way to catch a second youth.
Notable is the strength of the Russian men (not so the women). Legkov has been superstrong on the final climb before. Northug seems weaker than usual.
The Swedes though, seem to be closer to the pace when the going gets tough uphill. Hellner was really strong uphill after a maybe so-so Tour.
I am getting the impression that any fitness anomalies seen are mostly strength related. The strong finishes, and recovery from hard surges of pace. Northug in that respect seems to have lost his mojo.

Question : does Vylexhianin, having been caught "unhealthy" over 50% Hct before, have an advantage with this blood passport, being expect to stay close to those levels?
--------------------------
Hellner crushed Northug last year as well on the uphill finish. Northug at 82kilos is in a tough position when you have to climb like that, and it is a good thing that he cannot climb like a 65kilo guy(legkov).

Suspicion against the russians is understandable, but it is also possible that extra funding and motivation before the home olympics play a part. Legkov was very strong on the uphill, but far from the best on that leg.

The blood passport is a bit of a joke, as long as it fails to catch anybody.
Reply With Quote
  #834  
Old 01-08-13, 09:08
Armchaircyclist Armchaircyclist is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Posts: 114
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Cloxxki View Post
In women's XC, it seems that athletes go from finishing a stage to having a chat about random stuff without transition. Don't they need a breather or something? It's XC for crying out loud! The men either try harder, or have it harder.
It seems we used to see more people looking like dying after the finish line. Could just be me...
--------
We see this in most sports. Ever seen a local 400m run ? People bend over and are almost puking their guts out. Switch to olympics, and the medalists are almost instantly smiling at the camera.

At the end of TDS last uphill stage, most athletes fell to the ground and stayed there a little while. Maybe races are too easy these days, equipment is better, distances are the same, and run times lower.
Reply With Quote
  #835  
Old 01-08-13, 11:41
Cloxxki Cloxxki is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Posts: 1,908
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Armchaircyclist View Post
--------
We see this in most sports. Ever seen a local 400m run ? People bend over and are almost puking their guts out. Switch to olympics, and the medalists are almost instantly smiling at the camera.

At the end of TDS last uphill stage, most athletes fell to the ground and stayed there a little while. Maybe races are too easy these days, equipment is better, distances are the same, and run times lower.
Sure, at the end of the Tour they did do some sincere huffing and puffing. Not too surprising of course.
Reply With Quote
  #836  
Old 01-08-13, 11:44
Cloxxki Cloxxki is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Posts: 1,908
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Armchaircyclist View Post
--------------------------
Hellner crushed Northug last year as well on the uphill finish. Northug at 82kilos is in a tough position when you have to climb like that, and it is a good thing that he cannot climb like a 65kilo guy(legkov).

Suspicion against the russians is understandable, but it is also possible that extra funding and motivation before the home olympics play a part. Legkov was very strong on the uphill, but far from the best on that leg.

The blood passport is a bit of a joke, as long as it fails to catch anybody.
On this forum, we have to be aware of the W/kg concept. Northug may be heavier, but he might also have a bigger cardiovascular system.
I used to race at 82kg myself (MTB), and rarely met my equal in climbing at my level racing. I actually lost out on the flats, I think due to aerodynamics kicking in. I am very lanky.
Northug seems to be awesome at extracting energy from his muscles somehow and not pass out from oxygen deficiency, a unique talent. He does suffer when he's forced so high above lactate threshold for so long.

Last edited by Cloxxki; 01-08-13 at 12:13.
Reply With Quote
  #837  
Old 01-08-13, 15:28
Trond Vidar Trond Vidar is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Posts: 161
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Armchaircyclist View Post
--------------------------
Hellner crushed Northug last year as well on the uphill finish. Northug at 82kilos is in a tough position when you have to climb like that, and it is a good thing that he cannot climb like a 65kilo guy(legkov).

Suspicion against the russians is understandable, but it is also possible that extra funding and motivation before the home olympics play a part. Legkov was very strong on the uphill, but far from the best on that leg.

The blood passport is a bit of a joke, as long as it fails to catch anybody.
Legkov supposedly is 73kg

http://www.google.no/search?q=legkov...obile&ie=UTF-8
Reply With Quote
  #838  
Old 01-08-13, 21:18
Jaco0505 Jaco0505 is online now
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Posts: 9
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Trond Vidar View Post
According to this source and also norwegian newspapers, Legkov is 65 kg http://au.eurosport.com/cross-countr...3/person.shtml
Reply With Quote
  #839  
Old 01-08-13, 22:12
Trond Vidar Trond Vidar is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Posts: 161
Default

There is no way he is 65 kg. not many male skiers are below 65, they are tiny!

178cm and this body is not 65. He would look like a purebred cycling climber

Reply With Quote
  #840  
Old 01-09-13, 00:19
Armchaircyclist Armchaircyclist is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Posts: 114
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Cloxxki View Post
On this forum, we have to be aware of the W/kg concept. Northug may be heavier, but he might also have a bigger cardiovascular system.
I used to race at 82kg myself (MTB), and rarely met my equal in climbing at my level racing. I actually lost out on the flats, I think due to aerodynamics kicking in. I am very lanky.
Northug seems to be awesome at extracting energy from his muscles somehow and not pass out from oxygen deficiency, a unique talent. He does suffer when he's forced so high above lactate threshold for so long.
--------
Well, many things might be possible in theory, but I think it is a well known fact that the "motor" or endurance capacity is not Northugs strength, and many are better than him on this part, which is why he is often coming to the front before an uphill section, lets himself slide back through the pack during the climb, and wins positions again on the downhill or flat sections.

Having extra muscles that are efficient in a sprint, is not easily combined with being the most enduring in a long uphill, just like in cycling. I would guess most people in the clinic would agree that being better than thin climbers uphill, and being the best sprint-finisher at the same time, reeks of doping from a long way. So that's why I'm almost pleased that our norwegian hero takes a beating in the long uphills...
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT. The time now is 19:39.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Copyright 2006 - 2009 Future Publishing Limited. All rights reserved. Future Publishing Limited is part of the Future plc group. Future Publishing Limited is a company registered in England and Wales with company registration number 2008885 whose registered office is at Beauford Court 30 Monmouth Street Bath, UK BA1 2BW England.