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General Which tyres for Paris-Roubaix? Whose time trial bike is fastest? Suspension mountain bikes or singlespeeders? Talk equipment here.

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  #11  
Old 09-26-10, 04:44
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St. Elia St. Elia is offline
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Originally Posted by The Bald Eagle View Post
Here is the Park Tool that is required for anyone who is interested:

http://www.bikebling.com/Park-Tool-C...c-ring-nut.htm
Yes this the the tool you use on all of the other bolts for the back side, except the one that goes into the crank.
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  #12  
Old 09-26-10, 05:34
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"The 11-speed chainrings now have eight shift positions with pins and special tooth profiles at each. This is up from six shift positions (and from fourbefore that). The chainring bolts no longer have a female nut on the backside. Instead, they thread directly into the inner chainring and are tightened with a Torx key."

<http://velonews.competitor.com/2010/09/cyclocross/interbike-tech-campagnolos-2011-groups-explained-—-and-stand-by-for-a-campy-cyclocross-group_142178>

Quoted from a velonews article from interbike on the 2011 Campagnolo groupo.
My bolt comes off with a torx as I said. I cannot imagine what your cranks have that is different?
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  #13  
Old 09-26-10, 05:41
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St. Elia St. Elia is offline
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Originally Posted by Master50 View Post
"The 11-speed chainrings now have eight shift positions with pins and special tooth profiles at each. This is up from six shift positions (and from fourbefore that). The chainring bolts no longer have a female nut on the backside. Instead, they thread directly into the inner chainring and are tightened with a Torx key."

<http://velonews.competitor.com/2010/09/cyclocross/interbike-tech-campagnolos-2011-groups-explained-—-and-stand-by-for-a-campy-cyclocross-group_142178>

Quoted from a velonews article from interbike on the 2011 Campagnolo groupo.
My bolt comes off with a torx as I said. I cannot imagine what your cranks have that is different?
Did you look at the pic? I'm talking about the small chain ring where it attaches to the crank arm. it looks like a torx key but has something in the middle that prevents me from using a standard tool. It's super record but not the 2011, not sure it there is a difference.
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  #14  
Old 09-26-10, 15:36
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St. Elia St. Elia is offline
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Originally Posted by The Bald Eagle View Post
Here is an image on the Campagnolo Website that shows in great clarity ( the chainring bolt that is screwed directly into the crank arm ) the exact same chainring bolt that You have on Your Crankset, and that is shown in Your up linked photo. Trying to help here to give the readers a clearer picture of what is required to remove this chainring bolt. Notice the grey shaped piece in the middle of the t-30 bolt.

www.campagnolo.com/jsp/en/tech/id_4.jsp
Yes, thanks for pointing it out I saw the website but didn't notice the photo was what I have been talking about. Now I just need to find the tool!!

Your earlier comments were correct, a T 30 with something in the way. It's super record and was made in lat 2007 early 2008.

Anyone have any ideas?
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  #15  
Old 09-27-10, 12:40
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Bustedknuckle Bustedknuckle is offline
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Originally Posted by St. Elia View Post
Yes, thanks for pointing it out I saw the website but didn't notice the photo was what I have been talking about. Now I just need to find the tool!!

Your earlier comments were correct, a T 30 with something in the way. It's super record and was made in lat 2007 early 2008.

Anyone have any ideas?
Yep, Campagnolo places a little plastic insert into the bolt, I assume to prevent anybody from removing it, not sure why. All chainrings wear out. Take a small screw driver or something and just break it out, pull it out then use the Torx wrench.
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  #16  
Old 01-23-13, 00:56
cluffken cluffken is offline
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Originally Posted by St. Elia View Post
Ok I guess I'm not explaining myself very well.

On the inside of the crank, not the torx wrench side, where the small chain ring attaches to the crank arm. There is a star shaped hole with a special looking do dad in the middle. It's not standard. I'll try to take a pic of it today and post it.

Again thanks guys I know you are all trying to help.
St. Elia, The thing in the middle of the inside chainring bolt (the one that screws into back of crank arm) is a little plastic plug designed to keep home mechanics from being able to work on the cranks. Grab it with some needle nose pliers and try to yank it out, or just smush your Torx T30 into it hard enough to get a purchase and remove the bolt. Once the bolt is out it's easy to remove the little plastic plug.

I think Campagnolo does this because according to their documentation chainring replacement should only be done by a certified shop. I'd love to know why they say this.

- Ken
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  #17  
Old 01-23-13, 13:18
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Originally Posted by cluffken View Post
St. Elia, The thing in the middle of the inside chainring bolt (the one that screws into back of crank arm) is a little plastic plug designed to keep home mechanics from being able to work on the cranks. Grab it with some needle nose pliers and try to yank it out, or just smush your Torx T30 into it hard enough to get a purchase and remove the bolt. Once the bolt is out it's easy to remove the little plastic plug.

I think Campagnolo does this because according to their documentation chainring replacement should only be done by a certified shop. I'd love to know why they say this.

- Ken
Original Post from 2010...but welcome to the forum.
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  #18  
Old 03-14-13, 12:24
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frenchfry frenchfry is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cluffken View Post
St. Elia, The thing in the middle of the inside chainring bolt (the one that screws into back of crank arm) is a little plastic plug designed to keep home mechanics from being able to work on the cranks. Grab it with some needle nose pliers and try to yank it out, or just smush your Torx T30 into it hard enough to get a purchase and remove the bolt. Once the bolt is out it's easy to remove the little plastic plug.

I think Campagnolo does this because according to their documentation chainring replacement should only be done by a certified shop. I'd love to know why they say this.

- Ken
Thanks for the advice. I had been scouring the net for this information and found it right here on CN forums!

Those were the good old days when I could strip my bike down to the ball bearings with only a few special tools (that were compatible on virtually all bikes) and some common sense. Now the constructors say we shouldn't even do what could be considered regular maintenance and make it as difficult as possible. Crazy when it is so difficult to change a chain or chainring.
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