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  #12831  
Old 02-05-13, 00:10
Dr. Maserati Dr. Maserati is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Parker View Post
Not for Sky he wasn't.

He was British Cycling's doctor for many years. As you see from you're quoted bit, if someone at Sky sees 'Dr. Rog' then he charges Sky (or whichever team). He wouldn't do that if he was Sky's doctor. So it appears the job he was meant to have for three months he never actually had - which was my original point.
Your original point was "man changes job" was not newsworthy.

You have brought up everything about Palfreeman not being able to be Doc at Sky, nothing at all about who went on to fill that role.
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  #12832  
Old 02-05-13, 00:14
Parker Parker is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dr. Maserati View Post
Your original point was "man changes job" was not newsworthy.

You have brought up everything about Palfreeman not being able to be Doc at Sky, nothing at all about who went on to fill that role.
Your point was he left his job (Sky doc) after three months.
My point is that he never had that job.
You very nicely provided quotes showing just that.
He left BC to take up a consultancy position after the track season finished.

Now if Kimmage has a better story maybe he should tell it.

(Incidently, if you get a chance, read Herbie Sykes's uncut interview with Kimmage in the latest Rouleur - PK doesn't come out of it well). Having blind faith in a journalist is no better than having blinbd faith in a cyclist.

(I think my actual original point was that the great investigator couldn't find a phone number that I found in 30 seconds)

Last edited by Parker; 02-05-13 at 00:21.
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  #12833  
Old 02-05-13, 00:15
Parker Parker is offline
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Originally Posted by Fearless Greg Lemond View Post
Spin, spin, spin. So. Endulge us, why was he on the SKY internet page as a staff member?
You got a link? Because google can't find one.

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  #12834  
Old 02-05-13, 00:47
Dr. Maserati Dr. Maserati is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Parker View Post
Your point was he left his job (Sky doc) after three months.
My point is that he never had that job.
You very nicely provided quotes showing just that.
He left BC to take up a consultancy position after the track season finished.

Now if Kimmage has a better story maybe he should tell it.
So, Boassen Hagen rides for BC?

There was a job or role (Sky have only 3 employees, everyone else is contract). If Palfreeman has all this free time since the track season ended why not continue double jobbing?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Parker View Post
(Incidently, if you get a chance, read Herbie Sykes's uncut interview with Kimmage in the latest Rouleur - PK doesn't come out of it well). Having blind faith in a journalist is no better than having blinbd faith in a cyclist.
Good point, just as well I don't have blind faith in anyone, but your strawman attempt was noted.
And, no - I have no interest in whatever interview he did - it is the Sky fans that have problems with his personality - I look at what they have to say.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Parker View Post
(I think my actual original point was that the great investigator couldn't find a phone number that I found in 30 seconds)
And I addressed that, PK mentioned it in his tweet.
Of course the real point is why were transparent Sky reluctant to give Kimmage the number?
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  #12835  
Old 02-05-13, 00:52
northstar northstar is offline
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Ok, to recap. Dr. Roger Palfreeman, an anti-doping doctor, works for British Cycling and also does contract work for Team Sly. Dr. Rog leaves BC/Sky (those blurry lines between the 2). Sky then hires Geert Leinders, a doping doctor, to do contract work for them. Is this right?
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  #12836  
Old 02-05-13, 00:58
Dr. Maserati Dr. Maserati is offline
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Originally Posted by northstar View Post
Ok, to recap. Dr. Roger Palfreeman, an anti-doping doctor, works for British Cycling and also does contract work for Team Sly. Dr. Rog leaves BC/Sky (those blurry lines between the 2). Sky then hires Geert Leinders, a doping doctor, to do contract work for them. Is this right?
Yes, but you omitted the important point that Kimmage can't google up Palfreemans phone number
(ignoring that its a main number to a private hospital that Palfreeman attends once a week)
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  #12837  
Old 02-05-13, 01:05
martinvickers martinvickers is offline
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Originally Posted by Dr. Maserati View Post
And I addressed that, PK mentioned it in his tweet.
Of course the real point is why were transparent Sky reluctant to give Kimmage the number?
I'm not sure any ex-employee would be overjoyed if his former employer handed out his number to strangers - seems like basic employment etiquette. doesn't look great, I grant you, but I wouldn't hang a case on it.

FWIW below is the text of the 27 July 2010 interview Paul Kimmage mentioned in his tweets today - what is notable, I think, is at this stage, Paul has clearly a lot of time for Bradley - he seems to find the transformation amazing, but explicable. I was personally quite surprised quite how pro-brad they were; i expected something a lot more caustic even then - anyway, hope it's useful...

Quote:
Among Bradley Wiggins’s less heralded talents are a sharp eye for detail and an extraordinary gift for mimicry. He once phoned a journalist from the Tour of Italy and gave a pitch-perfect interview as David Millar. He can ape Lance Armstrong better than Big Tex himself, and his Mick Jagger is truly a thing of wonder. But his latest impression is the most audacious he has ever attempted and has left many observers perplexed. Can he “do” Alberto Contador? Is he truly a contender? Can Bradley Wiggins become the first Briton in history to win the Tour de France?

We meet on a Thursday evening at a hotel in the French Pyrenees at the end of a week spent rehearsing the Tour’s biggest climbs and preparing for his date with destiny. Four years have passed since his Tour debut in 2006 and I remind him of a quote he gave me after the first mountain stage to Pau that year, where he had finished 152nd of the 168 starters, 17 minutes behind the winner, Juan Miguel Mercado.

“You looked pretty dishevelled,” I recall. “This is how you described your day: ‘That first climb was just mind-blowing. There was one stage when I thought: what am I doing here?’ ”

“Yeah, I remember,” he says.

“Four years later, you start the race as a contender ... and indeed the first British contender since Robert Millar.”

“Yeah, a huge difference,” he agrees.

I understand people being suspicious. I have been, and still am in some respects, suspicious of some performances “Okay, now this is not a loaded question, but how do you explain that transformation?” I ask.

He doesn’t blink. “A lot of people — my peers and people I had been riding with at Cofidis [his team in 2006] — raised their eyebrows during the Tour last year and said it was impossible to do that transformation without the assistance of other things, and I can understand that.

"I mean, only a year earlier Bernhard Kohl had done almost the same thing [Kohl finished third but was disqualified for doping], so I don’t blame people for thinking that.”

“How did you deal with it?” I ask.

“My initial reaction was ... After the first week, a French journalist asked: ‘What do you say to people who are suspicious of your performances?’ and I reacted aggressively and angrily. It was the first time it really hit me that people were starting to doubt my performances. And then I didn’t really hear anything for two more weeks until after the final stage in Paris. I was in a nightclub at three o’clock in the morning and saw [Cervelo team rider] Brett Lancaster at the bar.

“We had raced on the track together for years and I went and said hello and he said, ‘Well done, Wiggo, blah-de-blah. I know a lot of the riders are saying you’re on drugs but I don’t think you are. You have always been a class rider on the track’. And I went away from him thinking, ‘So all the riders are saying I’m on drugs, are they?’ And I went home. I cracked it. I thought: ‘What is the f****** point in all that hard work and sacrifice if people are going to assume that?’ It really depressed me.

“So that was quite hard initially, but I can understand why people thought that, because I would have been, and still am in some respects, suspicious of some performances that I see. And at something like the Tour de France, to come from nowhere to fourth is just . . . I had jumped a huge, vast margin.”

Starting with an explanation
Let's start with the margin. Let’s start with the past four Tours and the vastness of Wiggins’s defeats . . .

2006: he finishes 124th behind the winner, Floyd Landis, at 3 hours 24 minutes and 32 seconds.

2007: he is 131st after 16 stages, 3hr 24min 29s behind the race leader, Michael Rasmussen, when his team announce that they are withdrawing from the race after Cristian Moreni tests positive.

2008: he does not start.

2009: he finishes 4th behind the winner, Contador, at 6min 1s.

... Let’s start with the question: can a man who has made his name riding flat out for four minutes excel for three weeks? Let’s start again: how do we explain this transformation?

“When I look back on 06,” Wiggins says, “my memory is of being an individual in the Tour de France. I can’t remember any point in that race helping anyone in the team or someone helping me. I wasn’t up there in the time trials. I wasn’t up there in anything. I was just ... at the back, a member of the Tour.”

“Things didn’t get much better a year later,” I suggest. “The 07 Tour was not a good experience?”

“No, but I felt I was much more a part of the race than I was in 06. I did a great prologue [4th] in London, had that long solo breakaway [stage 6 to Bourg-en-Bresse] and had a great time trial in Albi [5th], and then it all went down after that. Once we got taken out [of the race] it just destroyed me in a sense. I thought, ‘Sod this! I ain’t coming back next year’, and all my intentions turned to the Olympics.”

He won two gold medals in Beijing and in a memorable autobiography denounced the cheats who were “****ing on my sport and my dreams”. “Sod all of you. You are a bunch of cheating *******s and I hope one day they catch the lot of you and ban you all for life. You can keep doing it your way and I will keep doing it mine. You won’t ever change me, you sods. ******** to you all. At least I can look myself in the mirror.”

In 2009, he signed a two-year contact with Garmin Slipstream — still the most honourable and ethical team in professional cycling — and the first signs of a new Wiggins emerged when he was encouraged by the team director, Jonathan Vaughters, to reach higher and reset his goals.
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  #12838  
Old 02-05-13, 01:06
martinvickers martinvickers is offline
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And part II of that interview

Quote:
To be a really good road racer, he needed to climb better; to climb better, he would have to lose weight. He had tipped the scales at more than 80kg (12Åst) in Beijing but began slimming down with a diet supervised by the British Cycling nutritionist, Nigel Mitchell.

“They summed it up as trying to transform from a petrol engine to a diesel,” Wiggins explains. “I had to change my whole way of eating and what I ate at certain times. Off the track, you just eat pasta every day and as much of it as you like, but with this, on rest days I’d have to have salads.

“We were gluten-free for the whole year with Garmin, so we just had white rice, no pasta. I cut salt out of my diet; I cut sugar out of my diet — I used to have so much sugar in my coffee — it was just simple things.”

The season was two months old when he first noticed the difference during the mountain stage of the Criterium International in March 2009. “In other years, I would always get dropped on the first climb and just about make the time trial in the afternoon, but I was still with the front group until 5k to go.”

He had weighed in that morning at 77kg and went to bed that night with a smile on his face. “I thought, ‘Blimey! I wonder if I lost another two kilos?’ And I kept going like that. I started the Giro [the Tour of Italy in May] at 75 kilos — three kilos lighter than I had ever raced before — and hung on for as long as possible on the first mountain stage. I was only about 40th, but everyone was saying it was brilliant. The next day I was 20th and it just went from there.

“[Teammate] Tom Danielson actually said to me: ‘The way you are climbing, there is no reason you couldn’t do top 10 at the Tour’. And I was like, ‘No, don’t be silly’, but he was like, ‘No, I'm serious. The climbs will suit you much better’. So I came away with this idea for the Tour ... I said [told journalists] I could finish top 20 but I knew I was capable of top 10.”

While the track formed him and is in his blood (his Australian father, Gary, was a wizard on the boards), it was always the road that fuelled his dreams. As a boy, he would rush home from school to the exercise bike in his bedroom and spend hours pretending he was climbing with the favourites in the Tour. And for three weeks last July, that’s exactly how it was.

“It was amazing, actually,” he recalls. “I remember arriving with the group in Andorra [at the summit finish]. There were about 10 of us — Armstrong, Leipheimer, Cadel Evans, everybody was there. I was on the telly. It was a dream come true.”

But the dream was only beginning. Two days later, during the rest day in Limoges, Wiggins borrowed a team car and drove to a local hypermarket for a clandestine meeting with Dave Brailsford, the head of British Cycling and its soon-to-be launched professional road superteam, Team Sky.

“I knew what it was about, obviously,” Wiggins says. “They had been searching all year for someone [clean] to lead the team and a [contender] for the Tour, so it was the perfect scenario for them because they knew my performances were legitimate.

“He told me what he was planning, and after 10 minutes I said, ‘Yes, I’m sold on it’. Dave is like a big brother to me. I’ve known him for 10 or 12 years and done three Olympic cycles with him and I knew he wasn’t bull******** me.”

Dave Brailsford told me what he was planning and after 10 minutes I said, 'Yes, I'm sold on it' “What about Vaughters?” I ask. “You were still under contract at Garmin.”

“We had dinner in Girona after the Tour,” he replies.

“Did you tell him you were going to Sky?”

“I said I would like to go, obviously. I said, ‘I love you, Jonathan. I love the team, but if I am ever going to do something at the Tour de France, I am going to have to put everything into it, and that means having the best equipment and support’. I knew how they [Brailsford] had taken track racing to a new level and the sort of things they could do.

“And I know JV [Vaughters] didn’t want to let me go, but for my career, and to see how much further I can take this, I had to. It wasn’t financial. They [Garmin] offered me exactly the same money as what Dave offered me to stay, but I would have kicked myself if I had had to look at this team [Sky] from the outside and knowing what I was missing out on."

Pressure of being The Man
Wiggins has performed solidly during his first six months at Sky and finds himself, on the eve of his fourth Tour, as a team leader, a race favourite and one of highest-paid riders in the history of professional cycling. A year ago, he was a support rider at Garmin and on nobody’s radar. I ask about the pressures of being The Man.

“Well, that was my childhood dream,” he says, “and that’s what sport is all about. If I don’t want to do it, I can go back to the gruppetto [the last group on the climb] but I won’t get paid as much. I am physically in the ballpark to do something at the Tour de France, so why not try and give it a go? I’d feel pressure and worried if I hadn’t done everything right or knew I wasn’t in the condition, but I’m looking forward to going out and going through the process of each stage.

“I am 30 now. I feel like a totally different man to Athens in 2004. A lot changes ... and this sport does a lot to you as well.”

“In what way?”

“It just changes you. I am certainly a lot more professional about what I do now because I feel a responsibility in the sense of the money I am getting paid. And I have a duty to my family to make sure I do this properly. I am not going to be doing this much longer than the four years that I am with this team. I always said I would retire at 32-34, and don’t want to look back in 10 years’ time with any regrets. I want to get it out of my system now.”

“So if I made you an offer now, what would you take for the Tour?”

“Well, not position-wise ... all I would take is to do my best.”

“So you haven’t put a number on it?”

“No, I think that would be the first step to failure.”

“But you put one on it last year,” I remind him. “In an interview after the Tour, you said: ‘Winning the Tour has to be my goal now’.”

“Winning the bike race is always the goal,” he counters, “but I’m not going to say that anything after that would be a disappointment. To finish fourth again would consolidate everything and prove last year wasn’t a fluke, but I don’t think I’d be personally satisfied to finish fourth again. It’s not about pleasing other people. It’s about going out each day and putting a plan and a process together.”

“You sound like Steve Peters [his sports psychologist],” I tease.

“Yeah, I know,” he says with a smile, “but this is what we have trained for, mentally as well as physically, because, yeah ... anything could happen. Alberto [Contador] on paper is the strongest. He is the favourite, without doubt. He has proved it on a number of occasions, but he is not unbeatable. He could crash on the pavé [cobbled] stage and break his arm or whatever and [suddenly] the race is wide open.

“The first week this year is as decisive as the mountain stages with the Roubaix [cobbled] stage and the stage into Spa. So I am not going to put a number on it, I’m just going to keep fighting until Paris and see where I end up. I will be happy if I get on the podium but I don’t want to limit myself . . who would have thought last year that I could finish fourth?”
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  #12839  
Old 02-05-13, 01:57
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Caruut Caruut is offline
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Certainly doesn't seem to be any bad blood there, does there? Good find. Are there any articles in the meantime? Perhaps Kimmage wrote something bad about Wiggins after the 26th (?) placed finished of '10.
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  #12840  
Old 02-05-13, 02:09
Ferminal Ferminal is offline
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I wonder if Brad still has a gluten-free diet?
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