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Old 02-16-13, 19:52
avanti avanti is offline
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Default Homemade chain lube???

Ultrfast has released their formula for chain lube. This process looks like it will be expensive and time consuming for home made lube. Apart from which the particle sizes of the incredients are not specified.
http://www.cyclingnews.com/features/...n-lube-formula
and
http://www.friction-facts.com/forum/...-forum-post-55

This is interesting but I will stick with chain lube from my LBS.
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Old 02-18-13, 23:27
Carbonrules Carbonrules is offline
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If you're a fanatic you can just buy a prepared chain from him. But after a couple hundred miles its time to either retreat, or just put any lube on it.

There is no better general lube for metal surfaces than Polytetrafluoroethylene, otherwise known as Teflon. As Jason points out, just buy lubes that include heavier concentrations (eg; Rock & Roll). There are also some good spray lubes with PTFE although I have not looked at the concentration. Tri-Flow and Dupont both makes the spray lubes. You can buy a quart of Slick 50 and cut it down a little with mineral spirits then use it.
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Old 02-19-13, 01:23
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StyrbjornSterki StyrbjornSterki is offline
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There's an empirical test of chain lubes performed by the same chaps as linked to in the OP (www.friction-facts.com) in the March print issue of Velo magazine. They concluded that the best bicycle chain lube, both in terms of lubricity and durability, was wax paraffin (cue the Breaking Away chain in the cook pot clip).
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Old 02-19-13, 01:52
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2 parts odorless minteral spirits. One part oil. Voila! A liter of chain lube for a few bucks.
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Old 02-19-13, 07:44
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Quote:
Originally Posted by StyrbjornSterki View Post
There's an empirical test of chain lubes performed by the same chaps as linked to in the OP (www.friction-facts.com) in the March print issue of Velo magazine. They concluded that the best bicycle chain lube, both in terms of lubricity and durability, was wax paraffin (cue the Breaking Away chain in the cook pot clip).
Wouldn't wax paraffin solidify and stiffen the chain. I used lanolin (Wool Fat) once and this would cause the chain to stiffen in cold weather.
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Old 02-20-13, 15:38
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Done properly, you shake off most of the paraffin from the outer surfaces before it solidifies. Then, after it has cooled, it is fully free after a few revolutions of the chain around its course. Do it with the bike on a stand, spin it up after putting the chain back on. You might have a tiny bit of stiffness left - but that is gone within a 10th of a mile, riding.

Paraffin beats anything wet for chain wear, EXCEPT an oil bath, or perhaps daily oiling. But, I would put it up against even weekly oiling, since oil attracts dirt.

You have to soak the chain in liquified paraffin, though. I was given a commercial paraffin lube, and they directed the user to wipe it on. Uh - paraffin probably won't migrate like oil, so I would think this product would be rather useless. Use a double boiler pan to prevent fire hazard with the paraffin. Too hot and you can get a flash fire.

The interesting thing about what FrictionFacts found was that paraffin also beats other lubes on just friction. What is truly mind-blowing about all this is that paraffin is NOT a lubricant, and according to at least one hydrocarbon chemist I knew - has no lubricating properties. But it works, so something is going on there. Maybe one day somebody will do a study and figure out why.

Oh - one other thing - you have to redo the paraffin much less often than any wet lube (silicone, PTFE, whatever). However, if you find a product that leaves a pure ptfe residue, with no carrying agent, let me know. If you could coat the chain with ptfe the way I do with paraffin, there might be something in that.
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Last edited by hiero2; 02-20-13 at 15:41.
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Old 02-21-13, 14:41
Hawkwood Hawkwood is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hiero2 View Post
Done properly, you shake off most of the paraffin from the outer surfaces before it solidifies. Then, after it has cooled, it is fully free after a few revolutions of the chain around its course. Do it with the bike on a stand, spin it up after putting the chain back on. You might have a tiny bit of stiffness left - but that is gone within a 10th of a mile, riding.

Paraffin beats anything wet for chain wear, EXCEPT an oil bath, or perhaps daily oiling. But, I would put it up against even weekly oiling, since oil attracts dirt.

You have to soak the chain in liquified paraffin, though. I was given a commercial paraffin lube, and they directed the user to wipe it on. Uh - paraffin probably won't migrate like oil, so I would think this product would be rather useless. Use a double boiler pan to prevent fire hazard with the paraffin. Too hot and you can get a flash fire.

The interesting thing about what FrictionFacts found was that paraffin also beats other lubes on just friction. What is truly mind-blowing about all this is that paraffin is NOT a lubricant, and according to at least one hydrocarbon chemist I knew - has no lubricating properties. But it works, so something is going on there. Maybe one day somebody will do a study and figure out why.

Oh - one other thing - you have to redo the paraffin much less often than any wet lube (silicone, PTFE, whatever). However, if you find a product that leaves a pure ptfe residue, with no carrying agent, let me know. If you could coat the chain with ptfe the way I do with paraffin, there might be something in that.
Interesting that your chemist mate says that it doesn't appear to have lubricating properties. There's an old household hint that if drawers in a chest of drawers are binding, you rub wax on the runners. What's the wax they use on skies does that work for the same reasons? Finally there was a classic 1970s book on bike maintenance called `Richard's Bicycle Book' it recommended paraffin wax for chains.
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Old 02-21-13, 14:57
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hawkwood View Post
Interesting that your chemist mate says that it doesn't appear to have lubricating properties. There's an old household hint that if drawers in a chest of drawers are binding, you rub wax on the runners. What's the wax they use on skies does that work for the same reasons? Finally there was a classic 1970s book on bike maintenance called `Richard's Bicycle Book' it recommended paraffin wax for chains.
I agree with you, but I'm not a chemist myself, and he was actually working in the petrochemical industry, and one would think he would know something about the topic. On skis, wax is actually to add grip, not remove it, or, perhaps more accurately, to change the grip, as harder waxes were used for certain types of snow to reduce grip. I actually learned to ski when wax was still being used - but just as it was going out of fashion. On the drawer slides, chalk is good too, and I don't think it is a lubricant in any sense. But, obviously, SOMETHING is going on (with the chains) that is either lubricating, or emulating a lubricated micro-environment SOMEHOW, eh?

I remember "Richard's Bicycle Book". I might still have a copy somewhere. I didn't realize he recommended paraffin in there!

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Old 02-21-13, 14:59
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I just use chainsaw oil. Have done for years, it gets into the rollers and pins and stands up well to moisture.
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Old 02-21-13, 15:01
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Fiemme View Post
Wouldn't wax paraffin solidify and stiffen the chain. I used lanolin (Wool Fat) once and this would cause the chain to stiffen in cold weather.
One other note - lanolin gets harder in cold weather. Paraffin is already hard at room temperature - so no. It doesn't get stiffer as a result of the cold.
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