Win a 'Road to Roubaix' DVD - CyclingNews Forum

Go Back   CyclingNews Forum > Road > Professional road racing

Professional road racing A place to discuss all things related to current professional road races. Here, you can also touch on the latest news relating to professional road racing. A doping discussion free forum.

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 04-01-09, 23:41
LC - Cyclingnews LC - Cyclingnews is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Posts: 11
Default Win a 'Road to Roubaix' DVD

Here's your chance to win the latest film about the world's favourite Classic, Paris-Roubaix.

Cyclingnews has four copies of 'Road to Roubaix' to give away to readers who love their Classics. Cyclingnews reviewed it ahead of Christmas last year, and liked it so much we had the guys at Masterlink Films send us some more to share.

All you have to do is tell us is: Why do the Spring Classics get you going?

You can tell us about your experiences at the races (if you've been fortunate enough to be there) or whilst watching them on TV. As long as you keep it brief (between 200-300 words) and enticing, you'll be in the running to win a copy of the film that delivers an intimate look at Paris-Roubaix.
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 04-02-09, 05:30
biffstephens biffstephens is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Posts: 1
Default

Why do the Spring Classics get me going?
I love cycling! Everything about it, cycling excites me. I enjoy riding in group rides, races and even the everyday commutes. I watch and participate in cycling year round. The Classics get me going for a few reasons. First and for most is I feel it?s real. It?s so not cycling in a sense. For most American?s there is no way they would think about taking their $8,000 dollar bikes down the same roads as the classics are raced on. Much like the Monte Paschi Eroica, it simply would be alien to most cyclist in the US, even most racers in the US?.in Europe it is a rite of passage.

Second is the rider?I think most cyclist like to idolize professional cyclist. I think most people like riders that are like themselves, even just a little bit. A few of mine are, Magnus Backstedt, Tom Boonen, George Hincapie, Stijn Devolder and Jens Voigt. These guys I at least I can relate to. These guys win the Classics or at least are a big part of them!! It motivates me when I am on the bike to see that I don?t have to weigh 148 pounds to be a great cyclist. They simply inspire me?

Last is the Flemish. They LOVE the sport. How can you not get excited about 100,000 overweight, late aged spectators standing in the rain and sleet (drinking beer) to watch 30 seconds of cycling?.this is not Monday night football?.it?s a lifestyle. In my opinion people that don?t love watching the classics have simply never seen one?..
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 04-02-09, 14:26
alem1583 alem1583 is offline
Editor-in-chief
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Posts: 7
Default It's the effort.

The Spring Classics are the "finals" every rider has been preparing for and studying up until now, the tension has been building since January, or even since last year's Classics Campaign - not only for the riders, but for me as well. I'm amazed and elated by the idea of countless possibilities and risks all going right to deliver one rider to victory. The races are steeped in history, every hill, every section of road holds a pivotal moment in the history of the race. Riders must know and respect how to not only defeat their rivals, but how to conquer the route.

It's the first time all season that we see all of the top riders all putting a 100% effort, only to be countered by another 100% effort. There is no preparing for the next races or conserving for later in the season; the Classics demand the optimum for even a chance at success. The races go on, and the racers ride through anything spring time in Northern Europe can throw at them. From searing sun, dust, driving rain, to faces and legs caked with mud and cowpies, everyone does what they can to honor the top races. You can see the reverence in pre-race interviews, the grimaces etched in riders? faces along the course, and in the elation as the winner cross the finish - these riders will suffer to earn their place in history.
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 04-02-09, 15:57
CapeRoadie CapeRoadie is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: The sandy windswept peninsula
Posts: 36
Default

Ah, the Spring Classics, such history! Hinault racing at neige-Bastogne-neige in 1980, attacking almost 50 miles from the finish to win by ten minutes in the snow! And pick your Sunday in Hell story; there are so many: the 1949 race when Andre Mahe was blocked by the crowd at the entrance to the Roubaix velodrome, the 2006 race when Swiss Cancellara time trialed his way to victory before a train crossing blocked the route, or the 1990 race where the margin of victory was less than an inch! And the Ronde! Crashing or surviving a wet Koppenberg! Simpson's win over a confused Defillipis in 1961, Merckx having quite enough and simply taking the win by 5 1/2 minutes in 1969, or 2007's heartbreaking loss by local Leif Hoste to Ballan!

Ah, the Classics, raced over those simultaneously beautiful and wicked cut stones, the cobbles or paves, those incessant sharp moguls that make hard those hard men who dare put rubber down for an epic day of pain. Riders as hard as the stones themselves go to war on the rutted paths of northwestern Europe, with each Classic a different battlefield. Each race's cobbles uniquely formed, some sharper or rounder than others, with shapes particular to each race and reflecting the land where they were quarried and cut, qualities of stone that make each Classic as unique as its geology. The old gutted tracks of Paris-Roubaix are a rider's hell, whether wet or dry, for either way you're living a World War I trench war that helped give the race its name. One year, a cold, wet, and raw slipping surface where Lady Luck will hurl you down into an Arenberg trench; the next year, a dry sandstorm of dirt and grit that will blind you and cake onto your face and body, lining your lungs and layering your goggles enough to forget you're not in some Saharan-French mirage nightmare. And those hellsih cobblestones are alpine peaks, arranged so randomly that they must have been thrown down and forgotten. At Liege-Bastogne-Liege, "la doyenne" or "oldest", will rip your legs apart in its back half, where most of its numerous climbs come at all the wrong places. It's not a flat race like Roubaix, and the cobbles, while perhaps smoother, go uphill often. As does the Tour of Flanders! Yellow banners with the black Lion announcing King of the Flemish region of Belgium! The Koppenberg at over 9% grade is a make-it-or-break it, and if you're at the back you might be walking up, especially in the rain. The Muur is much the same, where the Lion of Flanders might finally emerge around a crowd-lined corner.

Ah, the Classics! The announcement that the real cycling season has begun! Time to get up, time to oil the chain, time to ride outside! Sping is truly here if you're a cyclist! Go get muddy and dirty on the roads!

Last edited by CapeRoadie; 04-06-09 at 05:19. Reason: I am pretending to be a writer. What? I need a reason?
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 04-02-09, 16:35
aaronvolvo315 aaronvolvo315 is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Posts: 3
Default Spring Classics

Why do the "Spring Classics" get me going. Well to be completely honest it's a sign to any competetive cyclist that its time to get in shape for whats ahead. It tells me to finally hang up the xc-skis and start spinning the cranks or I will be getting dropped in the early club rides or races in my area. Also its a real motivator watching all of the pros duke it out on the cobbles like the greats did back in the early days.

Aaron Johnson
Oswego, NY

Quote:
Originally Posted by LC - Cyclingnews View Post
Here's your chance to win the latest film about the world's favourite Classic, Paris-Roubaix.

Cyclingnews has four copies of 'Road to Roubaix' to give away to readers who love their Classics. Cyclingnews reviewed it ahead of Christmas last year, and liked it so much we had the guys at Masterlink Films send us some more to share.

All you have to do is tell us is: Why do the Spring Classics get you going?

You can tell us about your experiences at the races (if you've been fortunate enough to be there) or whilst watching them on TV. As long as you keep it brief (between 200-300 words) and enticing, you'll be in the running to win a copy of the film that delivers an intimate look at Paris-Roubaix.
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 04-02-09, 16:41
Gee333
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Why do the Spring Classics get me going? Because damn it, I want to see Hincapie finally win Paris-Roubaix!!
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 04-02-09, 17:32
Turtle Turtle is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Baltimore
Posts: 1
Default

Simply put, it?s the riders. All cyclist are masochistic, some more than others and it?s the men that battle the elements, the cobbles, the hellingen and the other cyclomasochists of Spring that appeals to me. The great thing about the classics is that you don?t have to win one to be remembered; if you suffer year in and year out putting every ounce of your being on the roads (if that is what you want to call them) you will be adored by many and become legendary. If Hincapie never wins a Ronde or Roubaix he?ll still be legendary because people know how bad he wants to win one. Often times the mental suffering one has to endure is more powerful on the emotions of others than that of just the physical suffering. This is why the Spring Classics get me going.
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 04-02-09, 18:22
rcclarkie rcclarkie is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Posts: 1
Default Because cycling isn't just about the glory of le Tour...

I commute 2-hrs every day by bike in rain, sleet, and snow; often all at the same time. Here in Canada, it's winter most of the year, so we're fortunate to get a daily dose of "the Classics" right in our back yard.

My daily ride includes cobbled sections, steep, punchy hills, tree-lined forest sections and windy, exposed farmlands. I ride it hard, both ways, challenging myself across the elements and feeling a connection with the experience.

There are no fans lining the bergs, screaming my name or waving Flanders flags in my face. There are no photo-motos shadowing my pace, nor any helicopters tracking my progress from the skies above. But I ride it all anyways.

And for this I appreciate the generations of hard-men who have braved the Classics. Many of them came from modest backgrounds and the surrounding areas, training on those same roads for that one chance to toe the starting line. For the chance to grit their teeth, ride with the best, and have stories to tell their children.

Most never amounted to much, but they never had to. They got their one chance to race a Classic, and that's all they wanted.

And so cycling isn't all about the glory of le Tour, it's about the connection with the experience and the glory of participation.
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 04-02-09, 18:31
mr. tibbs's Avatar
mr. tibbs mr. tibbs is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Austin, TX
Posts: 1,814
Default

I love the Spring Classics b/c they make the best sandwiches. And I f***in LOVE sandwiches.

Grand Tour sandwiches are okay, and the World Championship and Lombardy make some good sandwiches, too, but De Ronde and Roubaix just seem to make the best sandwiches, year in and year out.

And they're big, too; I usually eat half of one and then wrap the other half up and keep it in the fridge for later. Mmm...sandwiches!
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 04-02-09, 20:10
Moosegreenwood Moosegreenwood is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Posts: 1
Default Just Amazing

The Spring Classics represent everything great about cycling.
The joy, the pain, the disappointment the sheer brilliance of competitive cycle racing. Standing by the road on a cold wet April morning somewhere in the flat lands of Belgium, the scent of spring is not far away.
As the peleton roll's nervously along, hoping for a no incident day, the dreams of making history is on everybody's mind. The days are hard with the dirt and grime not always present, but often not far away. The Spring Classics are inspirational to every race following cyclist around the world. We all have our own Roubaix days. Some more than others. Cycling down here in the South Island of New Zealand we don't get many. 25 years of cycling in the English Lake District i had lots. These guys keep me going. They represent the mysterious deep rooted passion for doing the hard miles, as well as the easier more pleasant days spent in the saddle. As someone great once said ' lots of people ride bikes, not many really understand'.
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT. The time now is 21:41.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Copyright 2006 - 2009 Future Publishing Limited. All rights reserved. Future Publishing Limited is part of the Future plc group. Future Publishing Limited is a company registered in England and Wales with company registration number 2008885 whose registered office is at Beauford Court 30 Monmouth Street Bath, UK BA1 2BW England.