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General Which tyres for Paris-Roubaix? Whose time trial bike is fastest? Suspension mountain bikes or singlespeeders? Talk equipment here.

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Old 04-30-10, 21:31
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elapid elapid is offline
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Default 23mm v 25mm Tires

I have always ridden 23mm tires except for a recent touring trip where I rode 25mm tires. But I am not sure why I, most cyclists I know, and professional cyclists ride on 23mm tires if the rolling resistance is less on 25mm tires.

Is it because of the increased weight of 25mm tires?
Is it because of the higher pressures you can use in 23mm tires?
Are any of these offset by the decreased rolling resistance of 25mm tires?
Is there something else that I am missing?
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Old 05-01-10, 01:47
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On rough surfaces the 25's will be faster and more comfortable. On smooth surfaces a narrow tire at high pressure will be faster. It all comes down to conditions. Riding a 25 on the rear and a 23 on the front can be a good compromise.
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Old 05-01-10, 03:01
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RDV4ROUBAIX RDV4ROUBAIX is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by elapid View Post
Is there something else that I am missing?
Yes, pros don't ride 23mm clinchers, usually on 21 or 22mm tubulars, 24, 25, 27 or 28mm for the ruff stuff.

Personally I ride clinchers most of the time, the biggest I can stuff in the frame, 25 or 28's depending on what rig I grab. I seek out gravel road sections on every road ride though. Endless miles of smooth pavement gets boring IMO, unless you're going uphill a lot. For my hilly rides I'm on 22mm Conti tubulars.
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Last edited by RDV4ROUBAIX; 05-01-10 at 05:31.
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Old 05-01-10, 06:08
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I have ridden 25mm for the past 8 or 9 years. They just ride better, and if I really want to lighten up, I will lose a little more weight (down 52 in the past year). The difference between 23 and 25 is pretty significant on chip seal and or generally rough roads in Corpus Christi.

I remember riding 18's in the late 80's and early 90's, but moved to 20, then 23 as I got older and enjoy being on the bike much more now.

On clinchers I feel a much more sew-up bite when I corner. The tires are rounder and corner better...
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Old 05-01-10, 12:21
rgmerk rgmerk is offline
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[QUOTE=elapid;196881Is there something else that I am missing?[/QUOTE]

I suppose there's three other possible factors:

1: the herd instinct - everybody else rides 23's, so I should too.
2: aerodynamics - which favours even skinnier tyres.
3: seat and chainstay clearance?
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Old 05-01-10, 12:37
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Archibald Archibald is offline
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I've never really thought about it, but it's just a mind thing... road bike=23mm, my old hybrid=25mm.

having just done Paris-Roubaix on 28mm on the road bike I am wondering where to use the 28's again (other than for Flanders next year)... they were fine to ride on and I must admit I'm getting tired of the crap conditions of the roads here in London for commuting...
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Old 05-01-10, 14:20
buckwheat buckwheat is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Archibald View Post
I've never really thought about it, but it's just a mind thing... road bike=23mm, my old hybrid=25mm.

having just done Paris-Roubaix on 28mm on the road bike I am wondering where to use the 28's again (other than for Flanders next year)... they were fine to ride on and I must admit I'm getting tired of the crap conditions of the roads here in London for commuting...

28mm GP 4 seasons are the best tires out there IMO. I'll never ride anything less than 25mm again and won't buy a bike that can't accomodate at least a 28mm.

Air is the best technology there is for vibration damping.
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Old 05-01-10, 21:02
Fred Thistle Fred Thistle is offline
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as a very young triathlete scouring magazines in the late eighties i took the go-fast wisdom of the time of riding 19mm clinchers-------(back then i was 73kg)

I kept wrecking sidewalls of my tyres cos clinchers get a square shape when the bag is so small thus making sidewall vulnerable... and handling is thus compomised in the corners

Now profile roundness is my God of tyres - by that I mean having a consistent contact patch with the road-one with no edges or changes to the nature of my connection to the road when leaning over.

Weight
only becomes an issue when racing- I don't train in groups much and I don't ride with a speedo- to worry about the performance issues when not racing would be... delusional.
Comfort on the other hand is always appreciated!

Now (78-80kg- still lean!) My race bike is a C'dale six13-
when racing I ride deep zipp tubulars 21mm...they are really round so cornering is a pleasure in terms of consistent grip.
ONLY race km's on these due to cost and inconvenience of punctures

If not racing I ride a cheap set of 28mm clinchers ... I was surprised they fit in there....They look sick!! handling is awesome-I have raced them on a day the wind came up too gusty for the deep sections... for general riding they are lovely

Last edited by Fred Thistle; 05-01-10 at 21:04.
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Old 05-01-10, 21:16
stephens stephens is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by elapid View Post
I have always ridden 23mm tires except for a recent touring trip where I rode 25mm tires. But I am not sure why I, most cyclists I know, and professional cyclists ride on 23mm tires if the rolling resistance is less on 25mm tires.
Who says there is less rolling resistance on 25mm tires? You may have read that test by fat tire makers but their caveat is "at the same tire pressure." Well, it is inappropriate to run 23 and 25 at the same psi so basically what they were saying is that if a 23 is underinflated it'll have the same rolling resistance as a 25mm. But when it's properly inflated, it'll have less of course (on smooth roads).
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Old 05-02-10, 11:06
maratsafin maratsafin is offline
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Default tyres or tied up?

there was a good blog on here from cervelo re tyres rolling resistance etc but they were for tubs not clinchers and I think that makes a difference. 23mm seems to be the order for the peleton aside of roubaix where 25-28mm ruled.

however many frames won't accommodate anything bigger than a 25mm and it's sometimes a squeeze with that. I have a kuota kom and a 25mm is very, very tight, 28mm impossible.

I did flanders sportive on conti gp4000s 23mm and was fine (reletively), no punctures. if I was commuting I'd get a cross frame and some 28-32mm for sure. I live in central london and often get the train out to e.croydon or surbiton to avoid the real potholes and cars.
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