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2015 World Track Championships

From the kilo to the hour record, if it's on the velodrome it goes in here

Moderator: Tonton

21 Feb 2015 22:03

And now France pushes all the way into the blue ring.

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TShame
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women's sprint final

21 Feb 2015 22:04

Vogel wins the first by 2mm.

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TShame
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21 Feb 2015 22:06

Vogel wins the second easily.
Ligtlee let Vogel take out the sprint, which was a bad decision.
She never got into Vogel's slipstream but rode beside her until she faded at the start of the turn.

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Men's Pursuit

21 Feb 2015 22:11

Kueng overcame a four second deficit in the first kilo and ripped the fading Bobridge apart in the last kilo. Poor Jack is racing backwards.

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21 Feb 2015 22:14

dirkprovin wrote:The tale of the men's Individual Pursuit was actually written in the qualifying and, if anything, in Bobridge's hour record attempt. He was the fastest at 2km by nearly 4 seconds and even his 3rd km was one of the fastest but his closing km was only the 7th fastest even though he was a clear fastest qualifier.

In the final he went out even faster, 1.05.921 (1.06.259) to Keung's 1.09.322 and his 2nd km was marginally quicker than Keung (1.02.042 to 1.02.278) but the writing was already on the wall at 3km (3rd km 1.05.008 to Keung's 1.03.416) and it was even by 3750m.

Brave it may've been but one would've hope something may register somewhere inside his skull that "death or glory" efforts rarely end with the latter.


Oh dear. But well done to his opponent who stuck to his plan.
User avatar Alex Simmons/RST
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21 Feb 2015 22:42

Alex Simmons/RST wrote:Oh dear. But well done to his opponent who stuck to his plan.


Indeed he did; he engaged his brain (unlike Bobridge) and was a deserving winner.
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22 Feb 2015 22:54

Final medal tally - Olympic events only

AUS 3G 1S 2B 6T
FRA 3G 1B 4T
NZL 1G 2S 3T
GER 1G 1B 2T
CHN 1G 1B 2T
COL 1G 1T
GBR 3S 3T
NED 2S 1B 3T
RUS 2S 2T
ITA 1B 1T
CAN 1B 1T
CUB 1B 1T
MAL 1B 1T

What can we take from these championships a year and a bit out from Rio ? GBR has certainly taken a knock and their sprint stocks in both genders some way off. The men's endurance program has "haemorrhaged" strength to the road post London and whilst Wiggins may add something and the TP remains competitive, it won't be easy. The GBR women's endurance program remains strong but AUS has clearly made significant gains and sent some clear messages during these championships.

FRA appears to be putting all their "eggs" in the male sprint events and the sprints appear the prime focus for GER as well as CHN & NED in the female events.

Despite the nice haul for AUS, it's not a completely rosy picture. Whilst the mechanical in TP qualifying probably cost them a shot at the gold medal ride-off; I'm not at all convinced the manpower of this squad is of the quality of the London line-up. Maybe they may strike it lucky in an "off vintage" cycle in this event. O'Shea medalled in Omnium but I still remained unconvinced that he has the "legs" when it really counts.

Is Meares going one Olympic cycle too long ? Arguably yes. I think her time may've passed in the individual sprint and given there is only 1 spot in this event from Oceania she may have to give way to Morton. She may still have the smarts for the Kieren and the Team Sprint still looks a shot at minor coin. The major hole for AUS is the male sprint ranks. Given there will only be 1 Oceania QFer in both Ind Sprint & Keiren; at this point they are ceding these spots to NZL.
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Men's sprint

22 Feb 2015 23:04

The first run for Bauge

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TShame
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22 Feb 2015 23:06

Bauge heads for the Gold in Men's sprint

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22 Feb 2015 23:07

Anna goes into the lead in the Keirin final.

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22 Feb 2015 23:08

Anna wins her Gold...number 11.

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That's all from me. Hope you enjoyed my photos.
TShame
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23 Feb 2015 16:56

TShame wrote:Anna wins her Gold...number 11.

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That's all from me. Hope you enjoyed my photos.

I did enjoy your photos.
Thank you, my friend.
Team GB 2016: victoRIOus, happy and gloRIOus
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23 Feb 2015 18:28

TShame wrote:Kueng overcame a four second deficit in the first kilo and ripped the fading Bobridge apart in the last kilo. Poor Jack is racing backwards.

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in his defense, he had already done 52 kms
"Hitler … didn't even sink to using chemical weapons."
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24 Feb 2015 01:31

dirkprovin wrote:Indeed he did; he engaged his brain (unlike Bobridge) and was a deserving winner.


I did some charting of the pacing strategies. Here are Bobridge's pacing for qualifier (4:16.219) and for the final (4:19.184):

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Zooming the vertical axis which cuts off the initial half lap time:

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And the final comparison with Kueng (Keung's QR was 4:17.183):

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We can see that Bobridge's strategy in the final was the same as in qualifying, it's just that he fatigued earlier and faded more quickly in the final.

Time difference Final to QR
Bobridge: 2.965 seconds slower in final
Kueng: 1.732 seconds slower in final

Kueng also had advantage of riding in the final heat so his strategy was to beat his opponent (Edmondson) and the second best time up to that point, which was Serov's 4:19.284. He didn't need to ride a 4:15 schedule but rather a 4:18 schedule and then race his opponent if he posed a threat in latter stages (he didn't, as Edmondson faded a lot in the final km and was 6 seconds down by the end), that would have provided Kueng with a little extra air resistance benefit in the closing stages. That pacing strategy meant he could save his legs a fraction for the final. It's smart riding.

Bobridge however was riding in the 2nd heat and had little choice but to put it all out there. He also looks like he had to pass his opponent in the last km, which can negate the draft benefit he'd have got depending on where the pass happened and how much extra effort was needed to make a quick clean pass.

If you look at Bobridge's QR lap times, notice the sharp change that occurred at around 3375-3500 metres mark. Before that lap times started to come down a bit as he is getting closer to his opponent and gets a draft benefit, then he had to push harder to pass which costs energy and track position and time, then of course loses the draft benefit once past which then resulted in slower lap times in final couple of laps.

In a ride off with closely matched opponents, then the draft benefit is somewhat less. In pursuit QR, nearly but not quite catching your opponent is ideal for a fast time. Having to pass can cost you. It's part of the lottery of qualifying when done 2 riders at a time. For fairness they should be single rides during QR but it's less fun to watch.

Here I add a line with a slope fade of 1sec per km, which I consider to be a guide to good pacing. If you fade faster than that then you likely went out too hard. Kueng seems to have been good in that respect, although depending on his power profile I suspect he started a little over conservatively and also left some speed out there as well, just not as much as Bobridge did. Being conservative early is less risky than over cooking it.

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User avatar Alex Simmons/RST
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24 Feb 2015 12:55

I'm sure all of us trackies have overcooked it, and we all have our individual style. I think I just remember seeing him start and saying that he's going out too fast.

Jack's times per kilo 2nd effort: (-00.3), +00.6, +01.7, +01.0
Stefan times per kilo 2nd effort: (-00.2), (-00.9), +01.1, + 01.6

Jack had the fastest first and second kilos in qualifying, Stefan fastest in third and fourth.


PS For anyone who missed it or wants to watch replay, try the BBC. YouTube replays are always a mess. But, the BBC is only posted until March 1.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/iplayer/episode/b0543887/world-track-cycling-championships-2015-22022015
TShame
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25 Feb 2015 12:56

I forgot to mention I am moving to Hong Kong. Apparently, one only needs to do a pursuit at 4:55 to qualify for the World's.
TShame
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25 Feb 2015 15:18

I know you are just joking, my friend,
but Cheung King-Lok is a quality rider
and qualified by earning UCI ranking
points like everyone else. He rode a
4:40 recently at the Asian Champs,
but is best known as a scratch and
points race rider with medals and top
five placings at World Cups and World
Championships over the past two or
three track seasons.
Team GB 2016: victoRIOus, happy and gloRIOus
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25 Feb 2015 21:55

Pacing analysis from recent WC IP:
http://alex-cycle.blogspot.com.au/2015/02/pursuit-spaghetti-elite-pacing.html

Some pretty ordinary pacing by the world's elite.

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The anomalies in two of the lines are likely reported timing errors - rider close together on track and the wrong split taken.
User avatar Alex Simmons/RST
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25 Feb 2015 23:38

Kueng got it right. It's tough to do when you look across the track and you are down two seconds.
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