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Tubeless Nightmare

Which tyres for Paris-Roubaix? Whose time trial bike is fastest? Suspension mountain bikes or singlespeeders? Talk equipment here.

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Tubeless Nightmare

04 Jun 2013 20:40

In forty years of cycling, I have often tried to use new equipment, always with a certain amount of patience and some expectation that I might find myself into some troubles. Well. I got a pair of Bontrager tubeless wheels with my new Trek Madone and I dared using them in the New York area, famous for roads in bad conditions and abundance of flats. I had a few simple punctures easily fixed on the road side and was congratulating myself on the selection of my tires. I loved the smooth feel of the lower pressure, and the nice cornering sensation while descending. The nightmare came when I had a nasty slash on a fairly brand new rear tire. Along with the typical noise of the air blowing out of the tire, there a geyser of the sealant gook as it was projected by the rolling wheel all over my bike, my clothing and even on the face of the guy riding behind me. That was not the end of it. Beside the fact that the tire could not be fixed on the spot, cleaning the bike turned out to be a nightmare as the sealant became dry, the silicone stuck on the paint of the frame, as well as coated the gears , the chain and even inside the brakes and the cranks around the BB. Not to mention the DI2 connections and the battery case. A horrible mess. Needless to say, I am back on my old clinchers with tubes inside and a few bucks short since I had to get rid of the chain and the cassette. Tubeless users, beware.
User avatar Dedelou
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04 Jun 2013 21:06

Tubless Nightmare or Cycling Skit Comedy Gold ;)

Don't worry I've seen people who use sealant on tubed tires do the same. Funny to see, if its not you getting sprayed by it :D
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User avatar ElChingon
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05 Jun 2013 12:12

Dedelou wrote:In forty years of cycling, I have often tried to use new equipment, always with a certain amount of patience and some expectation that I might find myself into some troubles. Well. I got a pair of Bontrager tubeless wheels with my new Trek Madone and I dared using them in the New York area, famous for roads in bad conditions and abundance of flats. I had a few simple punctures easily fixed on the road side and was congratulating myself on the selection of my tires. I loved the smooth feel of the lower pressure, and the nice cornering sensation while descending. The nightmare came when I had a nasty slash on a fairly brand new rear tire. Along with the typical noise of the air blowing out of the tire, there a geyser of the sealant gook as it was projected by the rolling wheel all over my bike, my clothing and even on the face of the guy riding behind me. That was not the end of it. Beside the fact that the tire could not be fixed on the spot, cleaning the bike turned out to be a nightmare as the sealant became dry, the silicone stuck on the paint of the frame, as well as coated the gears , the chain and even inside the brakes and the cranks around the BB. Not to mention the DI2 connections and the battery case. A horrible mess. Needless to say, I am back on my old clinchers with tubes inside and a few bucks short since I had to get rid of the chain and the cassette. Tubeless users, beware.


I don't understand why you couldn't keep using the chain and cassette. Even including one memorable incident where I over-inflated a converted non-tubeless tyre with a CO2 canister and it went [SIZE="7"][color="Red"]BANG[/color][/SIZE] showering me in latex like I was wiley coyote, it has always cleaned right off any metal parts. What kind of sealant are you running?
dsut4392
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05 Jun 2013 13:06

Dedelou wrote:In forty years of cycling, I have often tried to use new equipment, always with a certain amount of patience and some expectation that I might find myself into some troubles. Well. I got a pair of Bontrager tubeless wheels with my new Trek Madone and I dared using them in the New York area, famous for roads in bad conditions and abundance of flats. I had a few simple punctures easily fixed on the road side and was congratulating myself on the selection of my tires. I loved the smooth feel of the lower pressure, and the nice cornering sensation while descending. The nightmare came when I had a nasty slash on a fairly brand new rear tire. Along with the typical noise of the air blowing out of the tire, there a geyser of the sealant gook as it was projected by the rolling wheel all over my bike, my clothing and even on the face of the guy riding behind me. That was not the end of it. Beside the fact that the tire could not be fixed on the spot, cleaning the bike turned out to be a nightmare as the sealant became dry, the silicone stuck on the paint of the frame, as well as coated the gears , the chain and even inside the brakes and the cranks around the BB. Not to mention the DI2 connections and the battery case. A horrible mess. Needless to say, I am back on my old clinchers with tubes inside and a few bucks short since I had to get rid of the chain and the cassette. Tubeless users, beware.


Reality, what a concept. Remember that 'tubeless' came from the MTB world, so in certain conditions, you could run low pressure w/o pinch flats. Little application to road.

If ya want supple, bigger tire, less air..with a tube. samo for road discs..an answer seeking a question.
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05 Jun 2013 13:58

Changing your cassette and chain because you got sealant on them? It is latex mostly and while it makes a mess it peels off with bare fingers or a plastic dish scrubber.
A cut kills any tire and some guys put sealant in tubulars so that technology gets a pass too I guess. Just plain old fashion clinchers.. Funny that you got the worst case scenario early in your experience because you could have run over a tack and raved that you were able to pull it out and keep riding
I use regular tires on my MTB with sealant and no tubes. A flat is a real mess but the benefits of tubless make it worthwhile. A flat usually means putting in a tube in the field which also means you have to remove any thorns or other flat causing objects you might have picked up but you definitely get fewer flats with tubeless set ups. just carry a small cloth to wipe the 1 or 2 ounces of sealant. Any that is still liquid just spills out.
I just get a real sense you over stated the mess and over reacted to the resultant mess. Frankly I think you could soak a chain in Stans, put it on you bike, apply some oil and still ride, Most of the latex would come off in a few pedal strokes. It just does not adhere to metal all that tenaciously.
User avatar Master50
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05 Jun 2013 14:25

Better swap out the head set too.
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05 Jun 2013 21:57

Boeing wrote:Better swap out the head set too.


I'm surprised he didn't buy a new bike :eek:
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User avatar ElChingon
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05 Jun 2013 23:51

I offer a free disposal service for bike components marred by sealant.
"Listen, my son. Trust no one! You can count on no one but yourself. Improve your skills, son. Harden your body. Become a number one man. Do not ever let anyone beat you!" -- Gekitotsu! Satsujin ken
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06 Jun 2013 00:23

I trued a rear wheel once and then added a little loc-tight to each nipple. spun it to let it seep in but forgot about the white saddle.

Back when I couldn't mech a wrench I took a bike into the university shop. they put Tri-Flow on the chain and I had them warranty the entire group
User avatar Boeing
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11 Jun 2013 05:59

Memo: Never start a thread like this with out pictures.


Spilt some Stans tonight in the garage. Looked like the map of Hawaii
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12 Jun 2013 20:37

Remind me again. What problem do I have that all this mucking about with strange liquids solves?
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12 Jun 2013 22:17

winkybiker wrote:Remind me again. What problem do I have that all this mucking about with strange liquids solves?


Lack of random color on your kit.
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User avatar ElChingon
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13 Jun 2013 00:29

Ha ha ha... sorry but the whole story made me laught..You shouldn't have changed the chain and the cassette. Latex dries sooner or later and then you can scrab it or rub it with your fingers. After all cassette and chain had oil on them and latex don't stick on oily surfaces.
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14 Jun 2013 14:30

winkybiker wrote:Remind me again. What problem do I have that all this mucking about with strange liquids solves?


in a road bike tire at 120 psi? nothing
User avatar Boeing
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14 Jun 2013 16:24

Boeing wrote:in a road bike tire at 120 psi? nothing


That's what I thought. Thanks.
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15 Jun 2013 13:00

Boeing wrote:in a road bike tire at 120 psi? nothing


or road bike tire at 90 or 85 psi..nothing as well. I am .1 of a ton, ride with 85f, 90psi rear..very comfy ride, don't get flats, no pinch flats..no goop.
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15 Sep 2016 20:32

"I recently had a tire pressure issue while riding my hardtail 29er. My rear tire lost some pressure for whatever reason so I decided to use a little CO2 to complete the ride and get home. I’m currently using Stan’s NoTubes on a standard Giant wheelset with a tubeless-ready Specialized Captain tire.

Once I got home, I noticed that my rear tire was bleeding air excessively through the sidewalls. The bleeding was significant and completely even around the sidewalls, both sides — and only on the tire that got the CO2. I did a little research and found your article on this and the quote from Stan’s. “Do what you have to get home, but there might be issues using CO2 …” or something like that. There are issues.

The bleeding was so significant that the tire was completely wet and dripping clear liquid onto the floor. It was obvious that there was some sort of chemical (or other) reaction with the Stan’s from the CO2, so I decided to clean everything out and install new Stan’s to see if I could fix the issue. When I opened the tire, it was now completely dry with latex unevenly stuck to the tire and the rim. All of the liquidity of the Stan’s was gone. The shot of CO2 separated the Stan’s, and the liquid portion seeped out of my sidewalls and onto my garage floor while the latex portion stayed behind. After cleaning out everything from the tire and the rim, I installed new Stan’s and rode the same day with no issues. Everything seems back to normal now. So, “do what you have to get home” but know that you’re signing up to re-Stan’s your wheel if you use CO2."


This from Velonews. Lennard confirmed that this was real thing. Unbelievable. As if I needed another reason to ignore road tubeless.
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15 Sep 2016 23:23

Yet another reason to ride tubular :D
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Re:

17 Sep 2016 12:09

42x16ss wrote:Yet another reason to ride tubular :D


RIGHT on and winkybiker above you..clinchers are for nancys.
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Re: Re:

18 Sep 2016 16:58

Bustedknuckle wrote:
42x16ss wrote:Yet another reason to ride tubular :D


RIGHT on and winkybiker above you..clinchers are for nancys.


Tubulars on everyday road bikes are for nostalgic geezers that wish it was still 1986. ;)
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