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Gone double, getting geared bike withdrawl symptoms...

Which tyres for Paris-Roubaix? Whose time trial bike is fastest? Suspension mountain bikes or singlespeeders? Talk equipment here.

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Re: Re:

09 Apr 2016 11:20

ray j willings wrote:
winkybiker wrote:
ray j willings wrote:
King Boonen wrote:
ray j willings wrote:This is exactly why I ride a bonkers light bike. I just ride the rest takes care of itself.
Who wants to hack around on a big heavy bike with no gears.
I want to climb with speed and ease and that's exactly what I do.


That pretty much answers itself fella.


I do admire your one cog antics . Today I went up a short steep hill (Springhill)
30 times. I even dropped a guy on a Brompton on climb 27 :D


Is life not too short to ride the same hill 30 times in a row?


I was desperate to go for a ride but the weather was looking dodgy , so I thought instead of going for my usual ride of climbing around the hills of north London I thought I would ride the short steep climb of spring hill which is quite close to where I live so I could get home before the onslaught of rain which eventually arrived with the sound of glorious thunder later in the afternoon. I quite enjoyed it and its always good to mix things up. It was quite tough I managed to dig hard on the first 20 climbs after that I had to ease up and got some good digs in the last 3 climbs. The only bummer was near the end when my chain kept coming off my bottom jockey wheel.The wheel kept sliding off the bearings , that's what you get for using a 2grm jockey wheel. I will fix it tomorrow.

I must have a go at the everesting one day , I would need to get some serious miles in. climbing for 2 /3hours 3/4 times a week around north London ain't going to be enough.

http://cyclingtips.com/2014/03/everesting-climbing-8848-metres-in-a-single-ride/


"No such thing as a free lunch"...
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Re: Re:

09 Apr 2016 12:08

"No such thing as a free lunch"...[/quote]

Things can go wrong with any bike /any part. Its no big deal just put a bit of super glue on and its all sorted.
I think in future I will consider the Fibre lyte Carbon jockey wheels a bit heavier "4grms :D " But they have no bearings as such. Stephen came up with a pretty unique idea that works great. I still have a load [ 3 unopened] of 5grm jockey wheels that I use as well in combo with the AFC plastic jockey wheel. But all good went for a normal ride yesterday and jockey wheel is groovy. Thanks for your concern :D
AFC do state that going across the rear cog on the big ring can cause the wheel to slip of the bearings under load.
This is exactly what I do but I find a bit of superglue sorts that issue out. The AFC on my trek has not come off in over a year and a half I expect the same for the one on my Guru. It was new on just a few weeks ago so now I have glued it all should be good like the one on my trek . I'm sure all my ww fans would like me to keep them posted on this critical and vitally important issue :D
ray j willings
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12 Apr 2016 09:49

Really, how has this ended up as another WW thread?


Couple of turbo rides on the bigger gears (that's all they'll see for the rest of the year) and I have to admit the closer gap between the chainrings has resulted in much smoother FD shifting (Shimano 105, the FD works great but it can be a little clunky, especially as I refuse to change the cables until the bike seems the roads again) and the smaller gap does mean a lot less shifting at the back as I ramp up the resistance. I'm also pushing what would have been my biggest gear on the 50 for longer and using the two extra gears as well so it seem like a win win.

The two gears lost at the low end are considerably lower that what I ride fixed so I'm hoping that when I get it back on the road I won't care about them :)
Vincenzo Nibali:
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12 Apr 2016 10:20

You've inspired me to get back on fixed for the first time in two years.

Commuted in. Enjoyed it immensely.
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Re:

12 Apr 2016 10:24

kwikki wrote:You've inspired me to get back on fixed for the first time in two years.

Commuted in. Enjoyed it immensely.


Good man/woman! I am getting withdrawal symptoms from gears but every time I go out on the fixed wheel I forget about it, I just love riding fixed, even in the hills around Glasgow. Mainly I just want to see how I'd go against some of the racers I know if I had gears :)
Vincenzo Nibali:
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Reduce your carbon footprint, ride steel.
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12 Apr 2016 11:20

The problem is the downhills on fixed. I've lost my fluid descending pedalling skills and was bouncing up and down in the saddle like a rodeo rider. It'll come back though
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12 Apr 2016 11:24

What gear do you run? When anyone asks me they are always surprised when I say the downhills are much worse. You get used to getting out the saddle and pedalling very quickly but spinning the gear has to be developed.

I went out with the racers on a club run on Sunday. On the flat and rolling hills I was fine but on the downhills I just couldn't keep up at all. I was running an 81" gear which is either 40 or 50 inches smaller than what the rest of the guys had available, I just couldn't spin my legs fast enough! Dropped down a pace group and it was much more comfortable, still a little small on the flat and downhill but let me jump of the front on the ramps.
Vincenzo Nibali:
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Reduce your carbon footprint, ride steel.
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Re:

12 Apr 2016 12:43

King Boonen wrote:What gear do you run? When anyone asks me they are always surprised when I say the downhills are much worse. You get used to getting out the saddle and pedalling very quickly but spinning the gear has to be developed.

I went out with the racers on a club run on Sunday. On the flat and rolling hills I was fine but on the downhills I just couldn't keep up at all. I was running an 81" gear which is either 40 or 50 inches smaller than what the rest of the guys had available, I just couldn't spin my legs fast enough! Dropped down a pace group and it was much more comfortable, still a little small on the flat and downhill but let me jump of the front on the ramps.


105" on the track bike. 79 on the carbon race bike conversion and 70 on the Ti beater.

I get away with a higher gear on the CF bike because it is so light. That's what I took this morning.

I've ridden some 200 and 300k rides on the two road fixed, yo-yoing up and down hills with the geared. Usually, I'm absolutely battered by the end of it. On a normal mixed route I estimate riding fixed is about 10-20% harder.
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12 Apr 2016 15:08

I'm running 91" or 81" on my LeMond Fillmore at the moment for commuting/Training/club runs and just riding. It's slow going up hills but I don't feel ridiculously over-geared and it's certainly helpful on the flat and going downhill to have a longer gear. If I do really hilly runs I generally opt for around a 74", even a 70" if we're talking 2500m+ climbing with steep ramps. There is something very simple and liberating about a fixed gear. You don't get a choice, you just push what you have and it really appeals to me. The "hipster" accusations occasionally happen though!
Vincenzo Nibali:
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Reduce your carbon footprint, ride steel.
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12 Apr 2016 15:42

I do find my mind wanders more on fixed. It's a very fluid way of riding, but you have to anticipate a little to keep the flow.

My absolute favorite is if I get drawn into a commuter race. I sit on the back and wait for the next hill....drop back a bit, out of saddle to pick up speed, then sit back down and sail past with the fixie flywheel effect carrying me up. Works every time ;)
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13 Apr 2016 08:23

The Johan Museeuw way of riding, just push harder!

Yeah, the one benefit I do find is that on rolling roads with small, punchy ramps I'm already spinning the gear when I hit the bottom whereas most are pushing too big a gear and suddenly have to start slamming though the rings and cassette in a desperate effort to find the right one!


They're fantastic bikes for wandering on, even after this year on fixed it'll most likely remain something I do every winter and whenever it's wet.
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13 Apr 2016 17:18

S'funny because I view them as consummate summer bikes. They need a bit more care as they are inherently less stable and I don't want to add rain, mud and ice into the mix when I'm cornering without a freewheel.

But, that goes against the traditional view of them as winter training bikes.

Caught your finger in the drive train yet?
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Re:

14 Apr 2016 08:38

kwikki wrote:S'funny because I view them as consummate summer bikes. They need a bit more care as they are inherently less stable and I don't want to add rain, mud and ice into the mix when I'm cornering without a freewheel.

But, that goes against the traditional view of them as winter training bikes.

Caught your finger in the drive train yet?


I've climbed and descended icy road on my fixed wheel. It was slow but fun and it felt fine. It'll basically be because I'll leave the mudguards on for commuting and my road bike can only take those flimsy plastic things which snap if you touch them. Also, the drivechain on a fixed is so much more resistant. IT'll get ridden all year, but when I'm back on gears next year I can see it being pulled out whenever it's raining (and I do enjoy riding in the rain :) ).

Yes, yes I have. It resulted in a severed bone, surgery to reattach it and a now feelingless end of my right index finger and I was lucky that it was at least saveable!
Vincenzo Nibali:
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Reduce your carbon footprint, ride steel.
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14 Apr 2016 08:52

Faaaaaark!!!!

It's incredibly easy to do. Everyone knows not to spin the drive train and get hands near it, but because of the lack of freewheel if you touch the chain by the cog or chain wheel it winds your finger into it. I once did it whilst oiling the chain and turning it really slowly. Glad you salvaged your finger!!!
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Re:

14 Apr 2016 08:59

kwikki wrote:Faaaaaark!!!!

It's incredibly easy to do. Everyone knows not to spin the drive train and get hands near it, but because of the lack of freewheel if you touch the chain by the cog or chain wheel it winds your finger into it. I once did it whilst oiling the chain and turning it really slowly. Glad you salvaged your finger!!!


I was fitting mudguards with the bike upside down. Went to stand up, fell forward, grabber out to steady myself with my right hand but grabbed the chain and my left shoulder landed on the pedal and woosh! Backwards goes my finger into a decidedly dirty sprocket (because why bother cleaning a fixed wheel drive chain :) ). Cut straight through the nail and bone and left the end of my finger hanging by the pad. 14 hours later I was in surgery getting it fixed. Now you can hardly tell, the surgeon was amazed at the recovery.

I was very lucky. Here's a post-surgery photo. That pin extends through both knuckles. It was removed with some pliers :)

http://i983.photobucket.com/albums/ae313/skydog83/IMG_0790_zps7t1dpj3e.jpg (No img tags, only look if you want to! It's not that bad though).
Vincenzo Nibali:
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Reduce your carbon footprint, ride steel.
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14 Apr 2016 15:39

Ouch. Fixed gear bikes bite. I truly believe they need respect whether riding or not. For such a simple machine, things can go bad very quickly.

Which is part of their appeal :D

For any readers thinking of trying fixed. Never forget to keep pedalling. For if you do stop pedalling the forward momentum will rip your legs in half at the knee, but you'll carry on down the road with your bloodied knee stumps being flailed by the gravelly ends of your lower legs, still clipped in at the feet, with a curious flak-flak flak-flak sound.
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16 Sep 2016 00:10

Got hold of a fully rigid SS Avanti 29'er dirt cheap from Cash Converters during the week, can't wait to clean it up and take it out. It's been totally neglected, so I'll have to strip it, sand it back and repaint it. It will also need a new chain and probably new BB/headset bearings.

I haven't owned a single speeder (or a MTB either) for about 4 years now, it will be great to get back on one again. I think my gear ratio will have to be a little smaller than my username though :D
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Re:

16 Sep 2016 00:12

kwikki wrote:Ouch. Fixed gear bikes bite. I truly believe they need respect whether riding or not. For such a simple machine, things can go bad very quickly.

Which is part of their appeal :D

For any readers thinking of trying fixed. Never forget to keep pedalling. For if you do stop pedalling the forward momentum will rip your legs in half at the knee, but you'll carry on down the road with your bloodied knee stumps being flailed by the gravelly ends of your lower legs, still clipped in at the feet, with a curious flak-flak flak-flak sound.

This is why I used to commute on a fixie, with a tiny gear and flat beartrap MTB pedals :twisted:

I never had to walk more than a few hundred metres to get it back...
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Re:

17 Sep 2016 12:06

kwikki wrote:The problem is the downhills on fixed. I've lost my fluid descending pedalling skills and was bouncing up and down in the saddle like a rodeo rider. It'll come back though


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bvmibwafGXc
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