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Gone double, getting geared bike withdrawl symptoms...

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Gone double, getting geared bike withdrawl symptoms...

05 Apr 2016 11:53

Finally fitted a double chainset to my road bike, one came up very cheap so thought I'd jump on it.


My year of only riding fixed/SS is going well but I'm getting withdrawl symptoms and want to ride my road bike...
Vincenzo Nibali:
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Reduce your carbon footprint, ride steel.
User avatar King Boonen
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05 Apr 2016 18:30

Focus......stay on target!!

Surely a wee spin on the road bike won't hurt at all??
Can you off set it by punishing your self for this "geared" indiscretion by doing twice as many miles on the SS??

What happens if you have a mechanical on the SS and you can't ride it for a few days??

You've set your self some very narrow / tight parameters to ride within......which i think is pretty cool btw ;)
User avatar JackRabbitSlims
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Re:

06 Apr 2016 09:58

JackRabbitSlims wrote:Focus......stay on target!!

Surely a wee spin on the road bike won't hurt at all??
Can you off set it by punishing your self for this "geared" indiscretion by doing twice as many miles on the SS??

What happens if you have a mechanical on the SS and you can't ride it for a few days??

You've set your self some very narrow / tight parameters to ride within......which i think is pretty cool btw ;)


If the fixed wheel bike fails I'll ride the road bike. As much as I want to complete the challenge I've set I'm not going to give up riding for weeks when I have a lovely bike that's been relegated to turbo work! :)

I think the problem is that I'm looking at Strava and seeing I'm as fast on my fixed wheel on my own as some of the guys I know who race are on their summer bikes, I'm itching to see how I go when I get back on gears.


Although, every time I get out on the fixed wheel I forget about it and just ride. Maybe I need to ride a bit more, my time has been cut down a bit recently.
Vincenzo Nibali:
"I know how to ride a bike"

Reduce your carbon footprint, ride steel.
User avatar King Boonen
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Re: Gone double, getting geared bike withdrawl symptoms...

06 Apr 2016 11:15

King Boonen wrote:Finally fitted a double chainset to my road bike, one came up very cheap so thought I'd jump on it.


My year of only riding fixed/SS is going well but I'm getting withdrawl symptoms and want to ride my road bike...


Had a MOOTS built as a fixie..no der hanger, cable stops. Rode it for about 6 months and got tired of riding the same, flat-ish places. Tried SS, same stuff..had the frame modded for rear der, shifter bosses, cable stops, rear brake..put on $20 ders, friction shifters..done. Much happier, wet weather bike.
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Re: Gone double, getting geared bike withdrawl symptoms...

06 Apr 2016 12:02

Bustedknuckle wrote:
King Boonen wrote:Finally fitted a double chainset to my road bike, one came up very cheap so thought I'd jump on it.


My year of only riding fixed/SS is going well but I'm getting withdrawl symptoms and want to ride my road bike...


Had a MOOTS built as a fixie..no der hanger, cable stops. Rode it for about 6 months and got tired of riding the same, flat-ish places. Tried SS, same stuff..had the frame modded for rear der, shifter bosses, cable stops, rear brake..put on $20 ders, friction shifters..done. Much happier, wet weather bike.


This is probably where we are different then fella. I ride my fixed wheel everywhere I ride my geared bike. 140km and 2,100m climbing is the biggest so far this year I think, will be doing longer and bigger rides as the light returns.
Vincenzo Nibali:
"I know how to ride a bike"

Reduce your carbon footprint, ride steel.
User avatar King Boonen
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06 Apr 2016 15:38

I used to ride a fixed gear bike around the north of England Youth Hosteling - I had a double sided fixed gear (69" and 59" as I recall) and wingnuts; I would change gears for long or steep hills. Still had to walk up several Lake District passes.
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Re:

06 Apr 2016 15:49

avanti wrote:I used to ride a fixed gear bike around the north of England Youth Hosteling - I had a double sided fixed gear (69" and 59" as I recall) and wingnuts; I would change gears for long or steep hills. Still had to walk up several Lake District passes.


74", 81" or 91" for me at the moment riding around Glasgow and the surrounding area (North to Aberfoyle and the Dukes Pass, West out over the Rest and Be Thankful and Sound to Largs and Healy Brae). Currently sticking with the 81" and 91" as training gears, will drop to the 74" or a 70" for any Sportives with more than 2500m climbing. Loving it so far!

I can imagine Hardknott is in the list of walked passes. I've not got down there yet on a road bike. Just my mountain bike, same with the Peak District and the Dales. Done a lot in North Wales though.
Vincenzo Nibali:
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Reduce your carbon footprint, ride steel.
User avatar King Boonen
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06 Apr 2016 23:04

This is exactly why I ride a bonkers light bike. I just ride the rest takes care of itself.
Who wants to hack around on a big heavy bike with no gears.
I want to climb with speed and ease and that's exactly what I do.
ray j willings
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Re:

07 Apr 2016 09:19

ray j willings wrote:This is exactly why I ride a bonkers light bike. I just ride the rest takes care of itself.
Who wants to hack around on a big heavy bike with no gears.
I want to climb with speed and ease and that's exactly what I do.


That pretty much answers itself fella.
Vincenzo Nibali:
"I know how to ride a bike"

Reduce your carbon footprint, ride steel.
User avatar King Boonen
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Re: Re:

07 Apr 2016 15:48

King Boonen wrote:
ray j willings wrote:This is exactly why I ride a bonkers light bike. I just ride the rest takes care of itself.
Who wants to hack around on a big heavy bike with no gears.
I want to climb with speed and ease and that's exactly what I do.


That pretty much answers itself fella.


I do admire your one cog antics . Today I went up a short steep hill (Springhill)
30 times. I even dropped a guy on a Brompton on climb 27 :D
ray j willings
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Re:

07 Apr 2016 16:21

ray j willings wrote:This is exactly why I ride a bonkers light bike. I just ride the rest takes care of itself.
Who wants to hack around on a big heavy bike with no gears.
I want to climb with speed and ease and that's exactly what I do.


When I rode in the UK (many years ago) my fixed gear bike was lighter than my road bike (A BSA with 3-speed Benelux derailleur and steel rimmed wheels).
avanti
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Re: Re:

07 Apr 2016 18:02

ray j willings wrote:
King Boonen wrote:
ray j willings wrote:This is exactly why I ride a bonkers light bike. I just ride the rest takes care of itself.
Who wants to hack around on a big heavy bike with no gears.
I want to climb with speed and ease and that's exactly what I do.


That pretty much answers itself fella.


I do admire your one cog antics . Today I went up a short steep hill (Springhill)
30 times. I even dropped a guy on a Brompton on climb 27 :D


Is life not too short to ride the same hill 30 times in a row?
winkybiker
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07 Apr 2016 19:35

Those are pretty big gears to be turning all the time. Do you have a stretching regime? If you do big miles on a big fixed gear you can get into all sorts of trouble. Not putting you off, but I'd hop on a geared bike now and again just to check your pedalling style is what it should be and you havent been over compensating on one side. You'd never notice on a fixed, but a free wheeled bike will show it up straight away.
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Re: Re:

07 Apr 2016 19:45

winkybiker wrote:
ray j willings wrote:
King Boonen wrote:
ray j willings wrote:This is exactly why I ride a bonkers light bike. I just ride the rest takes care of itself.
Who wants to hack around on a big heavy bike with no gears.
I want to climb with speed and ease and that's exactly what I do.


That pretty much answers itself fella.


I do admire your one cog antics . Today I went up a short steep hill (Springhill)
30 times. I even dropped a guy on a Brompton on climb 27 :D


Is life not too short to ride the same hill 30 times in a row?


I was desperate to go for a ride but the weather was looking dodgy , so I thought instead of going for my usual ride of climbing around the hills of north London I thought I would ride the short steep climb of spring hill which is quite close to where I live so I could get home before the onslaught of rain which eventually arrived with the sound of glorious thunder later in the afternoon. I quite enjoyed it and its always good to mix things up. It was quite tough I managed to dig hard on the first 20 climbs after that I had to ease up and got some good digs in the last 3 climbs. The only bummer was near the end when my chain kept coming off my bottom jockey wheel.The wheel kept sliding off the bearings , that's what you get for using a 2grm jockey wheel. I will fix it tomorrow.

I must have a go at the everesting one day , I would need to get some serious miles in. climbing for 2 /3hours 3/4 times a week around north London ain't going to be enough.

http://cyclingtips.com/2014/03/everesting-climbing-8848-metres-in-a-single-ride/
ray j willings
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Re: Re:

07 Apr 2016 19:48

avanti wrote:
ray j willings wrote:This is exactly why I ride a bonkers light bike. I just ride the rest takes care of itself.
Who wants to hack around on a big heavy bike with no gears.
I want to climb with speed and ease and that's exactly what I do.


When I rode in the UK (many years ago) my fixed gear bike was lighter than my road bike (A BSA with 3-speed Benelux derailleur and steel rimmed wheels).


That's true ,what was I thinking about. :confused: Check the WW thread on this site and the crazy light commute bike that a guy on the WW site put together. Its pretty sweet.
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Re:

08 Apr 2016 08:02

kwikki wrote:Those are pretty big gears to be turning all the time. Do you have a stretching regime? If you do big miles on a big fixed gear you can get into all sorts of trouble. Not putting you off, but I'd hop on a geared bike now and again just to check your pedalling style is what it should be and you havent been over compensating on one side. You'd never notice on a fixed, but a free wheeled bike will show it up straight away.


I ride my geared bike on a turbo at least once a week and check to make sure my form is still good. When I started on fixed I was running a 66" gear and I've slowly progressed up to pushing these bigger ones. I'm pretty careful about where I got out on which gears. The 91" gets used for mainly flat runs and any climbing I do rarely goes over 10% on that gear. The 81" is a club run gear, it lets me stay with the group averaging 18-20mph over the run, I mainly need that gear for the downhill parts so I don't fall too far off the back. If I'm doing much longer, hillier runs I will generally drop to a 74" gear and take it much easier.

Add to this that I almost always have a bigger sprocket on the other side of the wheel so if I feel I've gone out on too big a gear I can flip it over. Hope that sets any worries you might have at rest :)
Vincenzo Nibali:
"I know how to ride a bike"

Reduce your carbon footprint, ride steel.
User avatar King Boonen
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Re: Re:

08 Apr 2016 08:43

ray j willings wrote:I was desperate to go for a ride but the weather was looking dodgy , so I thought instead of going for my usual ride of climbing around the hills of north London I thought I would ride the short steep climb of spring hill which is quite close to where I live so I could get home before the onslaught of rain which eventually arrived with the sound of glorious thunder later in the afternoon. I quite enjoyed it and its always good to mix things up. It was quite tough I managed to dig hard on the first 20 climbs after that I had to ease up and got some good digs in the last 3 climbs. The only bummer was near the end when my chain kept coming off my bottom jockey wheel.The wheel kept sliding off the bearings , that's what you get for using a 2grm jockey wheel. I will fix it tomorrow.

I must have a go at the everesting one day , I would need to get some serious miles in. climbing for 2 /3hours 3/4 times a week around north London ain't going to be enough.

http://cyclingtips.com/2014/03/everesting-climbing-8848-metres-in-a-single-ride/


Everesting holds absolutely no interest for me, it's like cross-fit for cyclists. Might as well just spend 8 hours at high resistance on a turbo. Fine for those who like that sort of thing, but the idea of looking at the same things 40-odd times just completely destroys the whole point of cycling for me.

Spring Hill is the one at Walthamstow Marshes? I like the way the gradient just increases on that.
Vincenzo Nibali:
"I know how to ride a bike"

Reduce your carbon footprint, ride steel.
User avatar King Boonen
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Re: Re:

08 Apr 2016 18:10

King Boonen wrote:
ray j willings wrote:I was desperate to go for a ride but the weather was looking dodgy , so I thought instead of going for my usual ride of climbing around the hills of north London I thought I would ride the short steep climb of spring hill which is quite close to where I live so I could get home before the onslaught of rain which eventually arrived with the sound of glorious thunder later in the afternoon. I quite enjoyed it and its always good to mix things up. It was quite tough I managed to dig hard on the first 20 climbs after that I had to ease up and got some good digs in the last 3 climbs. The only bummer was near the end when my chain kept coming off my bottom jockey wheel.The wheel kept sliding off the bearings , that's what you get for using a 2grm jockey wheel. I will fix it tomorrow.

I must have a go at the everesting one day , I would need to get some serious miles in. climbing for 2 /3hours 3/4 times a week around north London ain't going to be enough.

http://cyclingtips.com/2014/03/everesting-climbing-8848-metres-in-a-single-ride/


Everesting holds absolutely no interest for me, it's like cross-fit for cyclists. Might as well just spend 8 hours at high resistance on a turbo. Fine for those who like that sort of thing, but the idea of looking at the same things 40-odd times just completely destroys the whole point of cycling for me.

Spring Hill is the one at Walthamstow Marshes? I like the way the gradient just increases on that.


That's spot on KB . Its more of a short power climb but after about 15 /20 reps you can feel it. I'm definitely going to do it again. I went for normal ride today and felt ok and fixed my jockey wheel so all good. I just need to lose a bit of easter egg weight :D chocolate feast of joy.
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Re: Re:

08 Apr 2016 18:32

King Boonen wrote:
kwikki wrote:Those are pretty big gears to be turning all the time. Do you have a stretching regime? If you do big miles on a big fixed gear you can get into all sorts of trouble. Not putting you off, but I'd hop on a geared bike now and again just to check your pedalling style is what it should be and you havent been over compensating on one side. You'd never notice on a fixed, but a free wheeled bike will show it up straight away.


I ride my geared bike on a turbo at least once a week and check to make sure my form is still good. When I started on fixed I was running a 66" gear and I've slowly progressed up to pushing these bigger ones. I'm pretty careful about where I got out on which gears. The 91" gets used for mainly flat runs and any climbing I do rarely goes over 10% on that gear. The 81" is a club run gear, it lets me stay with the group averaging 18-20mph over the run, I mainly need that gear for the downhill parts so I don't fall too far off the back. If I'm doing much longer, hillier runs I will generally drop to a 74" gear and take it much easier.

Add to this that I almost always have a bigger sprocket on the other side of the wheel so if I feel I've gone out on too big a gear I can flip it over. Hope that sets any worries you might have at rest :)


Yes, worries rested, thanks :D

Didn't mean to sound patronising, but I've seen what I described on a number of occasions.

As for Everesting, I wish you hadn't mentioned it, as now I'll have to do it and I know it will be a bit of a bugger.
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08 Apr 2016 21:49

Here is a great "Everest "climb in California - great scenery.
https://www.t.bike/2006/09/everest-challenge.html

Lots of great rides and climbs in the Owens Valley including one up to the Bristle Cone Pines and several with alpine switchbacks(unfortunately some of the switchback roads are not maintained and are deteriorating - maybe better suited to a mountain bike).
avanti
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