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Wheelset for 500€

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Wheelset for 500€

08 Apr 2016 06:08

Hello,

I'm looking for an upgrade over my stock wheels. The price point would be around 500 euros (preferably below it) and I have gotten an offer for Fulcrum racing 1s (2012 I think) for 500euros and Fulcrum zeros for 590. Do you have any other recommendations? I'm looking for a great all-rounder and a good looking design is also greatly appreciated. I really like the zeros but they are a little pricey, what do you think about the 1s?

Thanks in forward
Robinkoovit
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08 Apr 2016 08:52

All-rounder? Get some H Plus Son Achetypes built up on Ultegra/Hope hubs with double butted spokes. Fantastic, all round wheels. If you want something a little more classic looking then HPS do the TB-14 in three finishes or Ambrisio have re-issueed their blue Excellence rims with the brass valve badges. Classy as you can get.
Vincenzo Nibali:
"I know how to ride a bike"

Reduce your carbon footprint, ride steel.
User avatar King Boonen
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Re: Wheelset for 500€

08 Apr 2016 11:49

Robinkoovit wrote:Hello,

I'm looking for an upgrade over my stock wheels. The price point would be around 500 euros (preferably below it) and I have gotten an offer for Fulcrum racing 1s (2012 I think) for 500euros and Fulcrum zeros for 590. Do you have any other recommendations? I'm looking for a great all-rounder and a good looking design is also greatly appreciated. I really like the zeros but they are a little pricey, what do you think about the 1s?

Thanks in forward


Where are ya? Have a local wheelbuilding 'guru' who can design a wheelset specifically for you and your needs/wants/desires? Like Record/DT350 hubs laced to H+Son/HED/DT rims?
User avatar Bustedknuckle
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08 Apr 2016 12:04

Either a factory wheelset from Fulcrum or Mavic (Kysrium SLS can be bought from UK online stores for £380), or hand-built.

Good factory wheels give a weight vs stiffness ratio that hand-built will struggle to match, but hand-built will give the ability to easily replace rims when worn (not always easy to get spare parts for factory wheels)
User avatar kwikki
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08 Apr 2016 18:14

You will get a awesome set of handbuilt's for that price. If you source the parts yourself you could get around the 300 -400 euro.
ray j willings
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08 Apr 2016 18:49

You won't get any "awesome" set of wheels for that price....you'll get a pretty good set of wheels ;)

Wheel Builders will not be impressed if you rock up with all the parts that you've sourced yourself and ask that you build them some wheels.....in fact, the guys and gals I know will politely explain that they have long established relationships with suppliers that they would like to maintain..... and they'll get you the best price for the products. You're paying for their time, expertise and years of experience in that craft......money well spent IMHO ;)

Support your Local Bike Shop if you have one :)

As BK and KB have already said - custom, handmade wheels (if you know of a reputable builder close by) is a solid recommendation.
Rim, Hub, Nipple and Spoke choice should be made in consultation with the builder......they should have a decent chat to you about your riding style, weight and wheel expectations before offering a few choices.....ask them to offer a few choices as well.....spending a bit more could be a nice surprise.
User avatar JackRabbitSlims
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Re:

09 Apr 2016 12:21

JackRabbitSlims wrote:You won't get any "awesome" set of wheels for that price....you'll get a pretty good set of wheels ;)

Wheel Builders will not be impressed if you rock up with all the parts that you've sourced yourself and ask that you build them some wheels.....in fact, the guys and gals I know will politely explain that they have long established relationships with suppliers that they would like to maintain..... and they'll get you the best price for the products. You're paying for their time, expertise and years of experience in that craft......money well spent IMHO ;)

Support your Local Bike Shop if you have one :)

As BK and KB have already said - custom, handmade wheels (if you know of a reputable builder close by) is a solid recommendation.
Rim, Hub, Nipple and Spoke choice should be made in consultation with the builder......they should have a decent chat to you about your riding style, weight and wheel expectations before offering a few choices.....ask them to offer a few choices as well.....spending a bit more could be a nice surprise.


Have to agree. Most builders source their own parts and know what works best.
Both sets of wheels I have are handbuilt and very light "clinchers" which is what I wanted.
One set of wheels was put together by Jon at " Just riding along" and they have been fantastic weigh 1182grms pair. The other set I got the parts myself and have just had them rebuilt by my friend.
Both wheels are much better than equivalent super light production clincher wheels that I have used in the past and are way cheaper. I have rode nearly all the super light clinchers and you pay around and over a £1000 pound for a set. The hand built's are much better. If I lived in France or somewhere with more open/free roads I would go for some lightweights but I ride mostly in London and that would just be crazy "pot holes etc"

JRS is spot on with his comments .

I only know about Weight weenie stuff " I know nothing " :D
ray j willings
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09 Apr 2016 12:50

Well, yes, it depends on intended use, you, and your future budget.

If you have loads of cash a good stiff factory set like the higher end of the Kysrium range will give you a ride than hand-built will not match, regardless of components and who built them. Massive straightpull zicral spokes at high tension, laced into a stiff rim deliver very little deflection at the back, and no bounce at the front when descending.

But.....and it's a big but....you have to regard them as disposable items. As I mentioned above its really hard to get spares and to repair them after a couple of years. If you have the cash, they are great for dry summer use (ie. Less rim wear). They can handle the abuse, but she you do wear the brake track through, or even if you do manage to snap a spoke, it might just end up as scrap.

Hand built don't suffer from this problem. Spokes are readily available, and as long as you don't go for something super deep, you will have a bit of choice when you come to replace the rims and want to re-use the Spokes (eg. Open pro and Ambrosia Excellight have same ERD).

So, if it's a one off purchase and you aren't made of money then hand-built is the answer. Personally, I'd avoid the boutique hubs that are CNC lathed from a block of aluminium and go for something a bit more ordinary (Like Ultegra or DT Swiss).
User avatar kwikki
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Re:

09 Apr 2016 14:11

kwikki wrote:Well, yes, it depends on intended use, you, and your future budget.

If you have loads of cash a good stiff factory set like the higher end of the Kysrium range will give you a ride than hand-built will not match, regardless of components and who built them. Massive straightpull zicral spokes at high tension, laced into a stiff rim deliver very little deflection at the back, and no bounce at the front when descending.

But.....and it's a big but....you have to regard them as disposable items. As I mentioned above its really hard to get spares and to repair them after a couple of years. If you have the cash, they are great for dry summer use (ie. Less rim wear). They can handle the abuse, but she you do wear the brake track through, or even if you do manage to snap a spoke, it might just end up as scrap.

Hand built don't suffer from this problem. Spokes are readily available, and as long as you don't go for something super deep, you will have a bit of choice when you come to replace the rims and want to re-use the Spokes (eg. Open pro and Ambrosia Excellight have same ERD).

So, if it's a one off purchase and you aren't made of money then hand-built is the answer. Personally, I'd avoid the boutique hubs that are CNC lathed from a block of aluminium and go for something a bit more ordinary (Like Ultegra or DT Swiss).


In my case I would say my hand-built's ride as good if not better than any lightweight production clinchers I have bought. I have used mavics, toppolino etc all these wheels cost around and over a £1000 for a set.
I had issues with cracked carbon hubs. broken spokes etc and they felt/rode no better than my handbuilt wheels . These are light wheels though.
ray j willings
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09 Apr 2016 15:59

Have you tried then anywhere other than in London? :D


(but yes, it's a matter of personal perception, and I'm not going to try and argue that your experience isn't equally valid :) )
User avatar kwikki
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09 Apr 2016 16:30

Thaks guys! I will ask my local bike shop if they would be willing to build them for me. Anyways, before your replies I wasn't really looking into hand built wheels but you all seem to agree that they are the right choice. Thanks!
Robinkoovit
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Re:

09 Apr 2016 19:46

kwikki wrote:Have you tried then anywhere other than in London? :D


(but yes, it's a matter of personal perception, and I'm not going to try and argue that your experience isn't equally valid :) )


Yes I ride in Europe most years. I was in Nice a few months ago rode Col d eze . CoL d madone etc. I have rode just about every famous col in France and pretty fast as well. Also nipped to San Remo this year as well and will be heading to Barcelona in October and hoping to get back to Scotland this summer as well. So yes I do ride outside London and ride very well. Was well under 35 minutes for the Madone and that was my 3rd climb of the day .
ray j willings
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10 Apr 2016 06:30

http://dcrwheels.co.uk/products/dcr-components/dcr-alloy-rims/

£360/€470 1460g tubeless ready. 6+ months on my set over the winter with zero issues. Can't see me ever buying a set of factory wheels again.
LugHugger
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Re:

10 Apr 2016 15:41

kwikki wrote:Well, yes, it depends on intended use, you, and your future budget.

If you have loads of cash a good stiff factory set like the higher end of the Kysrium range will give you a ride than hand-built will not match, regardless of components and who built them. Massive straightpull zicral spokes at high tension, laced into a stiff rim deliver very little deflection at the back, and no bounce at the front when descending.

But.....and it's a big but....you have to regard them as disposable items. As I mentioned above its really hard to get spares and to repair them after a couple of years. If you have the cash, they are great for dry summer use (ie. Less rim wear). They can handle the abuse, but she you do wear the brake track through, or even if you do manage to snap a spoke, it might just end up as scrap.

Hand built don't suffer from this problem. Spokes are readily available, and as long as you don't go for something super deep, you will have a bit of choice when you come to replace the rims and want to re-use the Spokes (eg. Open pro and Ambrosia Excellight have same ERD).

So, if it's a one off purchase and you aren't made of money then hand-built is the answer. Personally, I'd avoid the boutique hubs that are CNC lathed from a block of aluminium and go for something a bit more ordinary (Like Ultegra or DT Swiss).


If your heart is set on a 'wheelouttabox', and you are sold on aluminum, yes very stiff, spokes, at least look at Fulcrum or Campag. Mavic rear hubs are complete crappola.

And in a couple of years, forget about rims or spokes because those wheels will no longer be supported and you'll have a pair of $1000 pen holders.
User avatar Bustedknuckle
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10 Apr 2016 15:46

Do Mavic still use those crappy plastic bushings in the freehub body?

My SL's are still going well after 10 years, but I had to Hub doctor both pairs, as well as a pair of Speed city's
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Re:

11 Apr 2016 13:03

kwikki wrote:Do Mavic still use those crappy plastic bushings in the freehub body?

My SL's are still going well after 10 years, but I had to Hub doctor both pairs, as well as a pair of Speed city's


Yup...altho a new hub design, right after DT's patent ran out, in some road hubs. Ratchet type system but anything rather than the plastic bushing, 2 pawl system..what junque.
User avatar Bustedknuckle
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11 Apr 2016 16:01

I've had no issues with the Pawl system and to be fair it is wearing well. Mind you, I'm very cautious with the maintenance and tend to re-oil them every 500 miles or so, which can mean fortnightly. That bushing system is pure sh1te though. It works when it's new, but it is guaranteed to wear out. Like most mavic owners I didn't even know about it until it started making that godawful howling noise.
User avatar kwikki
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Re:

12 Apr 2016 02:48

Robinkoovit wrote:Thaks guys! I will ask my local bike shop if they would be willing to build them for me. Anyways, before your replies I wasn't really looking into hand built wheels but you all seem to agree that they are the right choice. Thanks!


Counterpoint. I've had great experiences with factory wheels. Bontrager, Mavic, Campag, Fulcrum. My days with hand-built wheels (and j-bend spokes in general) were an endless succession of broken spokes and wobbly rims. I just had poor builders, it would seem.
winkybiker
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Re: Re:

21 Apr 2016 14:05

winkybiker wrote:
Robinkoovit wrote:Thaks guys! I will ask my local bike shop if they would be willing to build them for me. Anyways, before your replies I wasn't really looking into hand built wheels but you all seem to agree that they are the right choice. Thanks!


Counterpoint. I've had great experiences with factory wheels. Bontrager, Mavic, Campag, Fulcrum. My days with hand-built wheels (and j-bend spokes in general) were an endless succession of broken spokes and wobbly rims. I just had poor builders, it would seem.


It would. Good design, then good build, spokes don't break. 'Factory' wheels that end up being pen holders, since the 'factory' doesn't support the $lot$ wheel any longer, is poor form, but good for the marketeers and bean counters.
User avatar Bustedknuckle
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21 Apr 2016 14:52

Another consideration before upgrading wheels is to consider the tyres on your current wheels.
Even a pair of stock 'utility wheels' can perform much better with a tyre & inner tube upgrade.

Jay Kosta
Endwell NY USA
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