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Good wheels in a medium bike?

Which tyres for Paris-Roubaix? Whose time trial bike is fastest? Suspension mountain bikes or singlespeeders? Talk equipment here.

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Good wheels in a medium bike?

13 Sep 2016 10:57

Hi everybody. I'd like to greet all the forum members as I introduce myself, and I thank you all for any answer and help.
I'm a newby in the road cycling, no more than a year and I half since I bought my Triban 500 bike, and around 3000km done. I must say I'm quite happy with it, although is a kind of second class one compared with my fellow bikers' carbon-ultralight-triathlon-Ultegra-... cycles. Anyway I ride along with them, so I guess that gear is important, but not so much. :)
After this time I've had a chance to check that the wheel behaviour is really important, and that my poor Triban hasn't there her best feature.
So my hesitation is: Is it worth to invest some hundreds € changing the wheels to improve the performance of my bike? Provided that I haven't a chance to invest some thousands € to buy a new one. :sad:
If the answer is 'yes', Where should be the upper limit to improve the bike without fritting away my money?
Thanks for any suggestions, and greetings from the Basque Country.
daguilarh
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Joined: 13 Sep 2016 10:33

13 Sep 2016 13:19

I suggust that you first consider replacement tyres and innertubes for the bike's current wheels.
Lighter weight tyres (but sturdy enough to be reliable) will make a noticeable improvement.
And lighter weight innertubes (but not ultra light) will be helpful and reliable.

I don't think buying new wheels would be worth the expense. If you can find good used wheels at a low price, then yes.

Jay Kosta
Endwell NY USA
JayKosta
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Joined: 25 Nov 2010 13:55

13 Sep 2016 17:03

If you do not have them yet switch to clipless pedals and stiff soled shoes.

At some time you will want a better bike so watch out for end-of-season sales.
avanti
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Location: At 1,585 m elevation

Re:

13 Sep 2016 17:35

avanti wrote:If you do not have them yet switch to clipless pedals and stiff soled shoes.

At some time you will want a better bike so watch out for end-of-season sales.

Thx, avanti. I already have pedals and shoes.
Nowadays it's out of my possibilities. :redface:
So, Is it worth to put good wheels in a mediocre bike? I've ben researching, and I've heard about the Campagnolo Zonda. Less than 400€. That's more than my bike's retail price, but, Would it be a real improvement?
daguilarh
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Joined: 13 Sep 2016 10:33

Re:

13 Sep 2016 17:36

JayKosta wrote:I suggust that you first consider replacement tyres and innertubes for the bike's current wheels.
Lighter weight tyres (but sturdy enough to be reliable) will make a noticeable improvement.
And lighter weight innertubes (but not ultra light) will be helpful and reliable.

I don't think buying new wheels would be worth the expense. If you can find good used wheels at a low price, then yes.

Jay Kosta
Endwell NY USA

Thanks, Jay. I'll try to find second hands, but a friend told me that it is really difficult to know wether the bearings are in good condition or not.
daguilarh
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Re: Re:

15 Sep 2016 10:20

daguilarh wrote:
JayKosta wrote:I suggust that you first consider replacement tyres and innertubes for the bike's current wheels.
Lighter weight tyres (but sturdy enough to be reliable) will make a noticeable improvement.
And lighter weight innertubes (but not ultra light) will be helpful and reliable.

I don't think buying new wheels would be worth the expense. If you can find good used wheels at a low price, then yes.

Jay Kosta
Endwell NY USA

Thanks, Jay. I'll try to find second hands, but a friend told me that it is really difficult to know wether the bearings are in good condition or not.


Easy to take the wheels off and spin the axles with your fingers. If they feel like they are full of sand, stay away. If they don't, have a decent LBS/wheelbuilder check them for true/round/tension/dish. BUT, as has been mentioned, tires/tubes make a huge difference and riding performance depends on the below..not that much the bike.
-Fit-does the bike fit you?
-fat-lack thereof on you
-Fit-are you fit, strong both mentally and physically
-finesse-training and racing smart, getting the most out of each ride

The bike is a tool, the rider, the engine.
User avatar Bustedknuckle
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Location: USofA

15 Sep 2016 23:27

Unless you plan on racing very soon, or you're really competitive with your friends don't get too caught up about gear. BustedKnuckle is on the money as usual with his post above. A tyre and tube upgrade, a good bike fit and plenty of riding will give you more benefit than just spending money.
User avatar 42x16ss
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Location: Brisbane, Aus

Re: Re:

17 Sep 2016 10:50

Bustedknuckle wrote:
daguilarh wrote:
JayKosta wrote:I suggust that you first consider replacement tyres and innertubes for the bike's current wheels.
Lighter weight tyres (but sturdy enough to be reliable) will make a noticeable improvement.
And lighter weight innertubes (but not ultra light) will be helpful and reliable.

I don't think buying new wheels would be worth the expense. If you can find good used wheels at a low price, then yes.

Jay Kosta
Endwell NY USA

Thanks, Jay. I'll try to find second hands, but a friend told me that it is really difficult to know wether the bearings are in good condition or not.


Easy to take the wheels off and spin the axles with your fingers. If they feel like they are full of sand, stay away. If they don't, have a decent LBS/wheelbuilder check them for true/round/tension/dish. BUT, as has been mentioned, tires/tubes make a huge difference and riding performance depends on the below..not that much the bike.
-Fit-does the bike fit you?
-fat-lack thereof on you
-Fit-are you fit, strong both mentally and physically
-finesse-training and racing smart, getting the most out of each ride

The bike is a tool, the rider, the engine.


Thanks for your comment, I'll try the tyre/tube change.
Besides that, I agree. I see the bike as a machine, not as a goal. I'm not a 'carbon victim', and I freak out with people who pay bike (minus) grams at cocaine prices. :surprised:
-The bike fits perfectly. I didn't pay for a biometric study, but I think I customized it properly. As a matter of fact, I changed the stem for a adjustable one, because the steerer tube was already cut, and too low for me. People looks open-mouthed at my stem and my non-depilated legs.
-I'm on a normal weight, I could rip off a pair of kgs, though. :rolleyes:
-Fit? Not bad for my age, physically. Very motivated. I ride and run basically to ski better, and winter is coming!

And I use a pair of tricks to lighten my bike:
I dont' carry water if it's not absolutely necessary. In my area there are plenty of drinking fountains.
And, I defecate before my rides. Around 400 gr less. :)
daguilarh
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Re:

17 Sep 2016 10:52

42x16ss wrote:Unless you plan on racing very soon, or you're really competitive with your friends don't get too caught up about gear. BustedKnuckle is on the money as usual with his post above. A tyre and tube upgrade, a good bike fit and plenty of riding will give you more benefit than just spending money.


I'll pay attention to your advices. Thanks form the antipodes.
daguilarh
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Posts: 5
Joined: 13 Sep 2016 10:33

27 Feb 2017 22:26

I would try the used market but inspect the wheels very closely especially around the spoke hole openings to make sure there are not hairline cracks.

If you buy new wheels you can always keep them if you decide later to get a different bike, then you just put the old wheels back on the old bike and sell it.

There is a great low cost wheel maker in Korea called Soul, their best model is the 3.0 designed to be aero with a total weight of 1,530 grams for the wheel set. The price is very good at just $590 ($557 Euro, or $470 pounds) for the pair including shipping to Europe; anyway see this: http://2013.bikesoul.com/s3-0/ They do have some options you could add like ceramic hybrid bearings (which means the bearings are ceramic and the races are steel, which is how most of them are made) which you'll never notice the improvement, but those that have read where they claim can save about 9 watts fail to take into consideration that those numbers were combined with ceramic bottom bracket bearings, and ceramic derailleur wheel jockey bearings, thus ceramic wheel bearings by themselves might save you 2 watts if you're a high RPM turner, an amount you would never notice, and now there is controversy arising that the effect of ceramic bearings is completely useless unless you can pedal at over 5,000 rpms! ; titanium skewers but without seeing those I would avoid them; rim plugs...ehh, the amount of weight saved over rim strip I just don't think it would matter, but that ones up to you, if they sell them cheap then why not?

Anyway, check out Soul and see what you think, everyone that I've ever read about who bought a set of Souls were quite happy. Soul also has lighter CF wheels but for normal street use I wouldn't recommend going with CF.
froze
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Location: NE Indiana

01 Mar 2017 01:00

Start with a good set of Mavic. Reliable and good hub quality.
Basic is only around 300 for a set. (maybe 400)
https://www.probikekit.com/bicycle-wheels/mavic-cosmic-elite-wheelset/11191767.html

The better set with 50 rims are moore than 1200 new. I have the rear which I bought used.
Lots of riders/racers move up and sell their old wheels. Just don't buy too old a wheel.

Unless you are quite fast (40 kph and more), you don't need expensive aero wheels.
Stick with reliable and good quality.
Shame
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04 Mar 2017 17:31

Good wheels those mavic, has a friend and is very happy with them
water backpacks
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Location: London

Re:

05 Mar 2017 17:40

Shame wrote:Start with a good set of Mavic. Reliable and good hub quality.
Basic is only around 300 for a set. (maybe 400)
https://www.probikekit.com/bicycle-wheels/mavic-cosmic-elite-wheelset/11191767.html

The better set with 50 rims are moore than 1200 new. I have the rear which I bought used.
Lots of riders/racers move up and sell their old wheels. Just don't buy too old a wheel.

Unless you are quite fast (40 kph and more), you don't need expensive aero wheels.
Stick with reliable and good quality.


That rear hub is probably one of the poorest designs of bike rear hubs, there is. mavic finally changed it when DT's patent expired but the plastic bushing FH body is poor, noisy, draggy and wears quickly.

BUT, find a local wheelbuilder who can design and build a wheelset specifically for you and our needs.

Better hubs, more reliable, NO proprietary rims and spokes, near equal weight and probably less $.
User avatar Bustedknuckle
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