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Official Lance Armstrong Thread: Part 3 (Post-Confession)

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Re: Official Lance Armstrong Thread: Part 3 (Post-Confession

03 Feb 2018 21:55

thehog wrote:Collab with Rapha... should make everyone happy. LeMond never had a collaboration with Rapha :cool:

Image



They are paying to make their kit with Rapha ( who now offer custom it ) just like Castelli or Champ sys...

There was this Colab with Lemond .. long before Lance went down and while Greg was still out in the cold..

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KJVRDoaIyLs
User avatar dolophonic
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04 Feb 2018 11:39

I for one, really enjoyed those podcasts with Fogel... and that quote from Don Catlin (that lab tests designer, fonder of UCLA Olympic Analytical Laboratory): "Everyone dopes. Every single one of them..." (and he didn't mean (just) the Russians)
Shut up, Jens!
glassmoon
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Re:

04 Feb 2018 22:50

Gregga wrote:I've recently watched again each of Armstrong crazy attacks from 1999-2005, most of them fit so well Varjas' story and the "140w for 5 minutes" in Brunel's book, I'm now SURE he did use a motor. Of course, this was on top of EPO/BBs/testosterone who allowed him to be in the front group.

But motor was the way to LEAVE the front group (and make them look like juniors), I'm now sure of that.

Sestriere 1999
Hautacam 2000
Ventoux 2000 to catch Pantani
Alpe Huez 2001
Beille 2002
Luz Adiden 2003
etc.

There's exactly zero chance Phamstrong was using a motor because, if he had, there's exactly zero chance that someone (if not FLandis, Hamilton, or Andreau, then certainly his former mechanic, Mike Anderson [or all of the above]) would not have groused by now.

It simply beggars belief that he might have been using an electric motor but that his own bike mechanic and personal assistant not know about it, or that Anderson would not by now have blown the whistle.

If he had a motor, why didn't he use it in the ITT on Stage 12 in 2003, when he lost 1:36 to Ullrich and very nearly lost the TdF entire because he suffered too much from the heat?** You can't speculate that he would use a motor to create successes without also inquiring why he didn't use the same motor to stave off failures.


Pharmstrong's seeming indomitability in select mountain stages, IMHO, was down to four factors.

#1. Pharmstrong was coddled and his cheating turned a blind eye to by WADA, UCI and ASO. Because when he returned post-cancer to the European circuit, he brought with him something they had all coveted since the days of Jock Boyer: penetration of the American market. Even 3-time winner (and gunshot survivor) Greg Lemond failed to deliver on their hope, but Pharmstrong presented it to them gift-wrapped and tied up with a bow (without even having won his first TdF). Americans in their millions who wouldn't have known a bidon from a bidet or Charly Gaul from Charles de Gaulle were buying every bit of cycling kitsch in sight that bore either Pharmstrong's name or likeness or the Livestrong trademark.

#2. He had a superior doping program in the guise Michele Ferrari, who was -- pardon the pun -- at the "bleeding edge" of doping technology. And whose exclusive services Pharmstrong had retained.

#3. His entire team were better doped than any other team. USADA called it, "...the most sophisticated, professionalised and successful doping programme the sport has ever seen...." They were known as "the Big Blue Train" because when they decided to set the tempo for a stage, they were going to set the tempo for the stage. Period. Full stop. They could not be stopped because they collectively were too powerful. Such events were what Pharmstrong called his "getting out the hurt stick," an American slang reference akin to a jockey's "going to the whip," when he would don his patrón hat and exert his dominance over the peloton.

The fact that everyone on the team was doping not only improved their performance as a unit, it also gave Pharmstrong an added layer of security because their being complicit in the doping made them far less likely to grouse.

#4. The team itself were unusually well-optimised for the benefit of its captain. Yes, I know all the other teams also were "shields on me" around their star, but Motorola/USPS/Disco were setting a new standard.

For instance, Pharmstrong's teams were unusual in that they never carried a sprint specialist. Sprinters are useless in the mountains and so did nothing to enhance his chances of a GC win, so they simply didn't have one. Which means that when the mountains came and all the "Danger Men" began expending pawns in pursuit of the stage win, Pharmstrong essentially/potentially had 14% more pawns at his disposal than any opponent on a team that did have a sprinter. Plus, he enjoyed better protection in those dangerous final kilometers of a sprint finish because none of his eight teammates were excused duty from his protective phalanx.

And on any TdF featuring a TTT, Motorola/USPS/Disco were known to have invested more training time on team time trialing. Because Pharmstrong was one of the best ITTers and so sought to minimize how much time his less proficient teammates would cost him in the TTT.


Taken together, the latter two points meant that Pharmstrong was cosseted within the most powerful and best disciplined team in the peloton. It cannot be overestimated how much of his success was owed to the strength (and willingness to suffer) of his supporting teammembers, because that afforded him the greatest opportunity to "sit in" and expend minimum energies when the conduct of the race was business as usual.


Speaking specifically to "Ventoux 2000 to catch Pantani," in 1999, Il Elefantino had been tossed out of the Giro (while wearing the pink jersey) because he was caught with an Hct of 52. He only just had come off of an 11-month suspension for that doping infraction at the start of the 2000 Tour.

OTOH, in the 1999 TdF, Pharmstrong had been caught using corticosteroids. And on several different stages, possibly as many as six. Yet all his indiscretions were swept under the rug.

So what you are seeing on that stage on the Ventoux in 2000 is not a contest among equals, it is a contest between a man who doped with impunity because the sport's overlords protected him versus a man who doped with circumspection because he was under elevated scrutiny.



Most days, Pharmstrong cruised in the luxury of the Big Blue Train's first-class cabin. But whenever circumstance or strategy dictated that he personally lead the attack, Pharmstrong was not just the best-doped rider in the contest, he almost without exception also the best-rested. His seemingly superhuman performances weren't down to one motor that ran on electricity, they were down to nine motors powered by EPO.



** It bears mention that FLandis was there on that day in 2003. And I can't help but think that might have been the spark of the idea to use the heat to his advantage on the occasion of 2006's infamous Stage 17, which he gambled he could overcome by spending the entire stage "off the front," where he would have near unlimited access to water.
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Re: Re:

04 Feb 2018 23:19

StyrbjornSterki wrote:
Gregga wrote:I've recently watched again each of Armstrong crazy attacks from 1999-2005, most of them fit so well Varjas' story and the "140w for 5 minutes" in Brunel's book, I'm now SURE he did use a motor. Of course, this was on top of EPO/BBs/testosterone who allowed him to be in the front group.

But motor was the way to LEAVE the front group (and make them look like juniors), I'm now sure of that.

Sestriere 1999
Hautacam 2000
Ventoux 2000 to catch Pantani
Alpe Huez 2001
Beille 2002
Luz Adiden 2003
etc.

There's exactly zero chance Phamstrong was using a motor because, if he had, there's exactly zero chance that someone (if not FLandis, Hamilton, or Andreau, then certainly his former mechanic, Mike Anderson [or all of the above]) would not have groused by now.

It simply beggars belief that he might have been using an electric motor but that his own bike mechanic and personal assistant not know about it, or that Anderson would not by now have blown the whistle.

If he had a motor, why didn't he use it in the ITT on Stage 12 in 2003, when he lost 1:36 to Ullrich and very nearly lost the TdF entire because he suffered too much from the heat?** You can't speculate that he would use a motor to create successes without also inquiring why he didn't use the same motor to stave off failures.


Pharmstrong's seeming indomitability in select mountain stages, IMHO, was down to four factors.

#1. Pharmstrong was coddled and his cheating turned a blind eye to by WADA, UCI and ASO. Because when he returned post-cancer to the European circuit, he brought with him something they had all coveted since the days of Jock Boyer: penetration of the American market. Even 3-time winner (and gunshot survivor) Greg Lemond failed to deliver on their hope, but Pharmstrong presented it to them gift-wrapped and tied up with a bow (without even having won his first TdF). Americans in their millions who wouldn't have known a bidon from a bidet or Charly Gaul from Charles de Gaulle were buying every bit of cycling kitsch in sight that bore either Pharmstrong's name or likeness or the Livestrong trademark.

#2. He had a superior doping program in the guise Michele Ferrari, who was -- pardon the pun -- at the "bleeding edge" of doping technology. And whose exclusive services Pharmstrong had retained.

#3. His entire team were better doped than any other team. USADA called it, "...the most sophisticated, professionalised and successful doping programme the sport has ever seen...." They were known as "the Big Blue Train" because when they decided to set the tempo for a stage, they were going to set the tempo for the stage. Period. Full stop. They could not be stopped because they collectively were too powerful. Such events were what Pharmstrong called his "getting out the hurt stick," an American slang reference akin to a jockey's "going to the whip," when he would don his patrón hat and exert his dominance over the peloton.

The fact that everyone on the team was doping not only improved their performance as a unit, it also gave Pharmstrong an added layer of security because their being complicit in the doping made them far less likely to grouse.

#4. The team itself were unusually well-optimised for the benefit of its captain. Yes, I know all the other teams also were "shields on me" around their star, but Motorola/USPS/Disco were setting a new standard.

For instance, Pharmstrong's teams were unusual in that they never carried a sprint specialist. Sprinters are useless in the mountains and so did nothing to enhance his chances of a GC win, so they simply didn't have one. Which means that when the mountains came and all the "Danger Men" began expending pawns in pursuit of the stage win, Pharmstrong essentially/potentially had 14% more pawns at his disposal than any opponent on a team that did have a sprinter. Plus, he enjoyed better protection in those dangerous final kilometers of a sprint finish because none of his eight teammates were excused duty from his protective phalanx.

And on any TdF featuring a TTT, Motorola/USPS/Disco were known to have invested more training time on team time trialing. Because Pharmstrong was one of the best ITTers and so sought to minimize how much time his less proficient teammates would cost him in the TTT.


Taken together, the latter two points meant that Pharmstrong was cosseted within the most powerful and best disciplined team in the peloton. It cannot be overestimated how much of his success was owed to the strength (and willingness to suffer) of his supporting teammembers, because that afforded him the greatest opportunity to "sit in" and expend minimum energies when the conduct of the race was business as usual.


Speaking specifically to "Ventoux 2000 to catch Pantani," in 1999, Il Elefantino had been tossed out of the Giro (while wearing the pink jersey) because he was caught with an Hct of 52. He only just had come off of an 11-month suspension for that doping infraction at the start of the 2000 Tour.

OTOH, in the 1999 TdF, Pharmstrong had been caught using corticosteroids. And on several different stages, possibly as many as six. Yet all his indiscretions were swept under the rug.

So what you are seeing on that stage on the Ventoux in 2000 is not a contest among equals, it is a contest between a man who doped with impunity because the sport's overlords protected him versus a man who doped with circumspection because he was under elevated scrutiny.



Most days, Pharmstrong cruised in the luxury of the Big Blue Train's first-class cabin. But whenever circumstance or strategy dictated that he personally lead the attack, Pharmstrong was not just the best-doped rider in the contest, he almost without exception also the best-rested. His seemingly superhuman performances weren't down to one motor that ran on electricity, they were down to nine motors powered by EPO.



** It bears mention that FLandis was there on that day in 2003. And I can't help but think that might have been the spark of the idea to use the heat to his advantage on the occasion of 2006's infamous Stage 17, which he gambled he could overcome by spending the entire stage "off the front," where he would have near unlimited access to water.


That is a good, thorough, and (for me) compelling argument. Thanks.
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Re: Re:

08 Feb 2018 13:48

StyrbjornSterki wrote:
Gregga wrote:I've recently watched again each of Armstrong crazy attacks from 1999-2005, most of them fit so well Varjas' story and the "140w for 5 minutes" in Brunel's book, I'm now SURE he did use a motor. Of course, this was on top of EPO/BBs/testosterone who allowed him to be in the front group.

But motor was the way to LEAVE the front group (and make them look like juniors), I'm now sure of that.

Sestriere 1999
Hautacam 2000
Ventoux 2000 to catch Pantani
Alpe Huez 2001
Beille 2002
Luz Adiden 2003
etc.

There's exactly zero chance Phamstrong was using a motor because, if he had, there's exactly zero chance that someone (if not FLandis, Hamilton, or Andreau, then certainly his former mechanic, Mike Anderson [or all of the above]) would not have groused by now.

It simply beggars belief that he might have been using an electric motor but that his own bike mechanic and personal assistant not know about it, or that Anderson would not by now have blown the whistle.

If he had a motor, why didn't he use it in the ITT on Stage 12 in 2003, when he lost 1:36 to Ullrich and very nearly lost the TdF entire because he suffered too much from the heat?** You can't speculate that he would use a motor to create successes without also inquiring why he didn't use the same motor to stave off failures.


Pharmstrong's seeming indomitability in select mountain stages, IMHO, was down to four factors.

#1. Pharmstrong was coddled and his cheating turned a blind eye to by WADA, UCI and ASO. Because when he returned post-cancer to the European circuit, he brought with him something they had all coveted since the days of Jock Boyer: penetration of the American market. Even 3-time winner (and gunshot survivor) Greg Lemond failed to deliver on their hope, but Pharmstrong presented it to them gift-wrapped and tied up with a bow (without even having won his first TdF). Americans in their millions who wouldn't have known a bidon from a bidet or Charly Gaul from Charles de Gaulle were buying every bit of cycling kitsch in sight that bore either Pharmstrong's name or likeness or the Livestrong trademark.

#2. He had a superior doping program in the guise Michele Ferrari, who was -- pardon the pun -- at the "bleeding edge" of doping technology. And whose exclusive services Pharmstrong had retained.

#3. His entire team were better doped than any other team. USADA called it, "...the most sophisticated, professionalised and successful doping programme the sport has ever seen...." They were known as "the Big Blue Train" because when they decided to set the tempo for a stage, they were going to set the tempo for the stage. Period. Full stop. They could not be stopped because they collectively were too powerful. Such events were what Pharmstrong called his "getting out the hurt stick," an American slang reference akin to a jockey's "going to the whip," when he would don his patrón hat and exert his dominance over the peloton.

The fact that everyone on the team was doping not only improved their performance as a unit, it also gave Pharmstrong an added layer of security because their being complicit in the doping made them far less likely to grouse.

#4. The team itself were unusually well-optimised for the benefit of its captain. Yes, I know all the other teams also were "shields on me" around their star, but Motorola/USPS/Disco were setting a new standard.

For instance, Pharmstrong's teams were unusual in that they never carried a sprint specialist. Sprinters are useless in the mountains and so did nothing to enhance his chances of a GC win, so they simply didn't have one. Which means that when the mountains came and all the "Danger Men" began expending pawns in pursuit of the stage win, Pharmstrong essentially/potentially had 14% more pawns at his disposal than any opponent on a team that did have a sprinter. Plus, he enjoyed better protection in those dangerous final kilometers of a sprint finish because none of his eight teammates were excused duty from his protective phalanx.

And on any TdF featuring a TTT, Motorola/USPS/Disco were known to have invested more training time on team time trialing. Because Pharmstrong was one of the best ITTers and so sought to minimize how much time his less proficient teammates would cost him in the TTT.


Taken together, the latter two points meant that Pharmstrong was cosseted within the most powerful and best disciplined team in the peloton. It cannot be overestimated how much of his success was owed to the strength (and willingness to suffer) of his supporting teammembers, because that afforded him the greatest opportunity to "sit in" and expend minimum energies when the conduct of the race was business as usual.


Speaking specifically to "Ventoux 2000 to catch Pantani," in 1999, Il Elefantino had been tossed out of the Giro (while wearing the pink jersey) because he was caught with an Hct of 52. He only just had come off of an 11-month suspension for that doping infraction at the start of the 2000 Tour.

OTOH, in the 1999 TdF, Pharmstrong had been caught using corticosteroids. And on several different stages, possibly as many as six. Yet all his indiscretions were swept under the rug.

So what you are seeing on that stage on the Ventoux in 2000 is not a contest among equals, it is a contest between a man who doped with impunity because the sport's overlords protected him versus a man who doped with circumspection because he was under elevated scrutiny.



Most days, Pharmstrong cruised in the luxury of the Big Blue Train's first-class cabin. But whenever circumstance or strategy dictated that he personally lead the attack, Pharmstrong was not just the best-doped rider in the contest, he almost without exception also the best-rested. His seemingly superhuman performances weren't down to one motor that ran on electricity, they were down to nine motors powered by EPO.



** It bears mention that FLandis was there on that day in 2003. And I can't help but think that might have been the spark of the idea to use the heat to his advantage on the occasion of 2006's infamous Stage 17, which he gambled he could overcome by spending the entire stage "off the front," where he would have near unlimited access to water.


Good analysis. Thanks.
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Re: Re:

08 Feb 2018 20:50

StyrbjornSterki wrote:
Gregga wrote:I've recently watched again each of Armstrong crazy attacks from 1999-2005, most of them fit so well Varjas' story and the "140w for 5 minutes" in Brunel's book, I'm now SURE he did use a motor. Of course, this was on top of EPO/BBs/testosterone who allowed him to be in the front group.

But motor was the way to LEAVE the front group (and make them look like juniors), I'm now sure of that.

Sestriere 1999
Hautacam 2000
Ventoux 2000 to catch Pantani
Alpe Huez 2001
Beille 2002
Luz Adiden 2003
etc.

There's exactly zero chance Phamstrong was using a motor because, if he had, there's exactly zero chance that someone (if not FLandis, Hamilton, or Andreau, then certainly his former mechanic, Mike Anderson [or all of the above]) would not have groused by now.

It simply beggars belief that he might have been using an electric motor but that his own bike mechanic and personal assistant not know about it, or that Anderson would not by now have blown the whistle.

If he had a motor, why didn't he use it in the ITT on Stage 12 in 2003, when he lost 1:36 to Ullrich and very nearly lost the TdF entire because he suffered too much from the heat?** You can't speculate that he would use a motor to create successes without also inquiring why he didn't use the same motor to stave off failures.


Pharmstrong's seeming indomitability in select mountain stages, IMHO, was down to four factors.

#1. Pharmstrong was coddled and his cheating turned a blind eye to by WADA, UCI and ASO. Because when he returned post-cancer to the European circuit, he brought with him something they had all coveted since the days of Jock Boyer: penetration of the American market. Even 3-time winner (and gunshot survivor) Greg Lemond failed to deliver on their hope, but Pharmstrong presented it to them gift-wrapped and tied up with a bow (without even having won his first TdF). Americans in their millions who wouldn't have known a bidon from a bidet or Charly Gaul from Charles de Gaulle were buying every bit of cycling kitsch in sight that bore either Pharmstrong's name or likeness or the Livestrong trademark.

#2. He had a superior doping program in the guise Michele Ferrari, who was -- pardon the pun -- at the "bleeding edge" of doping technology. And whose exclusive services Pharmstrong had retained.

#3. His entire team were better doped than any other team. USADA called it, "...the most sophisticated, professionalised and successful doping programme the sport has ever seen...." They were known as "the Big Blue Train" because when they decided to set the tempo for a stage, they were going to set the tempo for the stage. Period. Full stop. They could not be stopped because they collectively were too powerful. Such events were what Pharmstrong called his "getting out the hurt stick," an American slang reference akin to a jockey's "going to the whip," when he would don his patrón hat and exert his dominance over the peloton.

The fact that everyone on the team was doping not only improved their performance as a unit, it also gave Pharmstrong an added layer of security because their being complicit in the doping made them far less likely to grouse.

#4. The team itself were unusually well-optimised for the benefit of its captain. Yes, I know all the other teams also were "shields on me" around their star, but Motorola/USPS/Disco were setting a new standard.

For instance, Pharmstrong's teams were unusual in that they never carried a sprint specialist. Sprinters are useless in the mountains and so did nothing to enhance his chances of a GC win, so they simply didn't have one. Which means that when the mountains came and all the "Danger Men" began expending pawns in pursuit of the stage win, Pharmstrong essentially/potentially had 14% more pawns at his disposal than any opponent on a team that did have a sprinter. Plus, he enjoyed better protection in those dangerous final kilometers of a sprint finish because none of his eight teammates were excused duty from his protective phalanx.

And on any TdF featuring a TTT, Motorola/USPS/Disco were known to have invested more training time on team time trialing. Because Pharmstrong was one of the best ITTers and so sought to minimize how much time his less proficient teammates would cost him in the TTT.


Taken together, the latter two points meant that Pharmstrong was cosseted within the most powerful and best disciplined team in the peloton. It cannot be overestimated how much of his success was owed to the strength (and willingness to suffer) of his supporting teammembers, because that afforded him the greatest opportunity to "sit in" and expend minimum energies when the conduct of the race was business as usual.


Speaking specifically to "Ventoux 2000 to catch Pantani," in 1999, Il Elefantino had been tossed out of the Giro (while wearing the pink jersey) because he was caught with an Hct of 52. He only just had come off of an 11-month suspension for that doping infraction at the start of the 2000 Tour.

OTOH, in the 1999 TdF, Pharmstrong had been caught using corticosteroids. And on several different stages, possibly as many as six. Yet all his indiscretions were swept under the rug.

So what you are seeing on that stage on the Ventoux in 2000 is not a contest among equals, it is a contest between a man who doped with impunity because the sport's overlords protected him versus a man who doped with circumspection because he was under elevated scrutiny.



Most days, Pharmstrong cruised in the luxury of the Big Blue Train's first-class cabin. But whenever circumstance or strategy dictated that he personally lead the attack, Pharmstrong was not just the best-doped rider in the contest, he almost without exception also the best-rested. His seemingly superhuman performances weren't down to one motor that ran on electricity, they were down to nine motors powered by EPO.



** It bears mention that FLandis was there on that day in 2003. And I can't help but think that might have been the spark of the idea to use the heat to his advantage on the occasion of 2006's infamous Stage 17, which he gambled he could overcome by spending the entire stage "off the front," where he would have near unlimited access to water.


Yeah with his A Grade rocket fuel plus the team he had beside him he never needed a motor. Same with Cancellara to a lesser extent but maybe Riis was giving him advice in other areas ? The CSC team from around 2008 was a pretty formidable team.
movingtarget
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Re: Official Lance Armstrong Thread: Part 3 (Post-Confession

10 Feb 2018 18:29

Armstrong interview filmed two weeks ago in Austin:

https://youtu.be/ngbtyUAJlWY
User avatar thehog
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24 Mar 2018 20:38

I feel sorry for Lance. Breaking news about his lawsuit, and his thread isn't even on the front page of the clinic anymore. Even thehog has abandoned him. Sad face. :(

Imma help a brother out.

http://www.cyclingnews.com/news/over-50-witnesses-called-in-lance-armstrong-whistleblower-case/

Walsh as a witness should be good for some entertainment value, especially with LA's team on cross.

Think he'll settle?

edit- I did almost click on the Armistead thread. Wrong LA. Poor old irrelevant Lance. Needs to get a Brit passport to get some attention.
“She lost the old-fashioned way, by being a terrible candidate. Case closed.”
Beech Mtn
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Re:

24 Mar 2018 20:51

Beech Mtn wrote:I feel sorry for Lance. Breaking news about his lawsuit, and his thread isn't even on the front page of the clinic anymore. Even thehog has abandoned him. Sad face. :(

Imma help a brother out.

http://www.cyclingnews.com/news/over-50-witnesses-called-in-lance-armstrong-whistleblower-case/

Walsh as a witness should be good for some entertainment value, especially with LA's team on cross.

Think he'll settle?

edit- I did almost click on the Armistead thread. Wrong LA. Poor old irrelevant Lance. Needs to get a Brit passport to get some attention.


Good to see Betsy and Greg still have skin in the game. How do think the other Posties testimony can be redirected now that it's not a Grand Jury and Tygart hanging over them?

I don't think it's up to him to settle.
aphronesis
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Re:

25 Mar 2018 03:28

Beech Mtn wrote:I feel sorry for Lance. Breaking news about his lawsuit, and his thread isn't even on the front page of the clinic anymore. Even thehog has abandoned him. Sad face. :(
Imma help a brother out.
http://www.cyclingnews.com/news/over-50-witnesses-called-in-lance-armstrong-whistleblower-case/
Walsh as a witness should be good for some entertainment value, especially with LA's team on cross.
Think he'll settle?
Drug cheat Lance Armstrong lists his Austin mansion for $7.5million to downsize
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-5530907/Drug-cheat-Lance-Armstrong-lists-Austin-mansion-7-5million.html

Settlement or not, the timing of this is probably not coincidental - he anticipates needing cash for some purpose, and is dropping the price of the house again as well

Beech Mtn wrote:edit- I did almost click on the Armistead thread. Wrong LA. Poor old irrelevant Lance. Needs to get a Brit passport to get some attention.
Searching Google for "Armstrong case" within the past week yields that CN article as the top result, and then here is the rest of the first page of results. A used 'Armstrong' saxophone case on eBay is of more interest to the world than Lance is, according to Google's priorities. And similarly "Armstrong trial" gives some pages about Kristin Armstrong's time-trial bike, and some stuff about Louis Armstrong in the 1950s. It may be that CyclingNews has done exceptionally good journalism, by beating the general mainstream press to the story. Or, it may be that silence reigns, because the Armstrong trial subpoenas being sent out is just not considered newsworthy.
Image
Wikipedia pretty much confirms that Lance is of less interest to the general public now than ever before, he got some attention during the 2017 Tour de France, and for interviewing a notorious actress last month on his podcast, that does look like the picture of a washed-up celebrity trying to cling on to dwindling relevance
Image
Last edited by ClassicomanoLuigi on 25 Mar 2018 04:06, edited 2 times in total.
ClassicomanoLuigi
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Re: Re:

26 Mar 2018 01:00

aphronesis wrote:
Beech Mtn wrote:I feel sorry for Lance. Breaking news about his lawsuit, and his thread isn't even on the front page of the clinic anymore. Even thehog has abandoned him. Sad face. :(

Imma help a brother out.

http://www.cyclingnews.com/news/over-50-witnesses-called-in-lance-armstrong-whistleblower-case/

Walsh as a witness should be good for some entertainment value, especially with LA's team on cross.

Think he'll settle?

edit- I did almost click on the Armistead thread. Wrong LA. Poor old irrelevant Lance. Needs to get a Brit passport to get some attention.


Good to see Betsy and Greg still have skin in the game. How do think the other Posties testimony can be redirected now that it's not a Grand Jury and Tygart hanging over them?

I don't think it's up to him to settle.


Please get JV on the stand, please! :cool:
User avatar thehog
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26 Mar 2018 01:12

oh yes.
aphronesis
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26 Mar 2018 08:18

Beech Mtn wrote:I feel sorry for Lance. Sad face. :(


http://www.cyclingnews.com/news/over-50-witnesses-called-in-lance-armstrong-whistleblower-case/

Walsh as a witness should be good for some entertainment value, especially with LA's team on cross.

Think he'll settle?


sure lance he wishes he could settle the old way.......................threatening floyd with
gratuitous violence....

Mark L
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Re: Official Lance Armstrong Thread: Part 3 (Post-Confession

26 Mar 2018 14:54

Sadly Lance is bit of whimp. If this went to trial a cross on Tygart’s 2006 line in the sand of when everyone stopped doping, JVs coaching athletes to dope would make fun viewing. Pity we won’t get to see it.
User avatar thehog
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Re: Re:

26 Mar 2018 20:11

ClassicomanoLuigi wrote:...Settlement or not, the timing of this is probably not coincidental - he anticipates needing cash for some purpose, and is dropping the price of the house again as well....

Maybe he needs to liquidate assets because he's feeling the urge to be heavily invested in cryptocurrency.
User avatar StyrbjornSterki
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28 Mar 2018 05:05

http://www.cyclingnews.com/news/lance-armstrong-pulls-out-of-tour-of-flanders-appearance/
Lance Armstrong has pulled out of a scheduled appearance at this weekend's Ronde van Vlaanderen, citing family reasons.
Salbutamol - Breakfast of Champions!
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User avatar Robert5091
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28 Mar 2018 08:26

You guys think Lance would have had some juicy comments regarding his situation if he would have come?
The sadness of the world has different ways of getting to people, but it seems to succeed almost every time
User avatar Bardamu
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Re:

28 Mar 2018 09:10

Robert5091 wrote:http://www.cyclingnews.com/news/lance-armstrong-pulls-out-of-tour-of-flanders-appearance/
Lance Armstrong has pulled out of a scheduled appearance at this weekend's Ronde van Vlaanderen, citing family reasons.

The "Ronde van Vlaanderen Business Academy" says: "due to a private-sphere drama, Lance Armstrong has canceled at the last minute"
Door een drama in de privé-sfeer heeft Lance Armstrong in laatste instantie moeten annuleren. Hij wordt komende vrijdag in Oudenaarde vervangen voor de eerste Ronde van Vlaanderen Business Academy door de bondscoach van de Rode Duivels, Roberto Martinez.

"It is with great sadness and regret that, due to a very serious family and personal matter, I cannot attend this years Ronde van Vlaanderen. Without going into too much detail, and out of respect for my family's privacy, I must stay close to my home here in Texas to deal with the situation."
The participants in the "Business Academy" are paying €295 each for a day-long program which was to have featured Lance as keynote speaker, now they suddenly have footballer Roberto Martinez substituted for Lance on the schedule. I guess it fits into the motivational-speaker / "leadership" rhetoric or whatever the business premise is... but doesn't make sense in the context of a Ronde cycling-themed event. This will disappoint and aggravate some people, but I suspect there is some substantial family-related reason for the cancellation

It's not like the good-old-days when Lance could charge businessmen $35,000 for the privilege of getting dropped and abandoned on a bait-and-switch charity ride
http://ireport.cnn.com/docs/DOC-860283
ClassicomanoLuigi
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Re: Official Lance Armstrong Thread: Part 3 (Post-Confession

28 Mar 2018 14:10

Regardless of all the shi! In the past or the outcome of this trail, imho his forward podcast is quite good and well intended.
User avatar Boeing
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05 Apr 2018 11:43

http://www.cyclingnews.com/news/bruyneel-on-doping-it-didnt-start-with-us-and-it-didnt-end-with-us/

I completely believe Bruyneel on one thing: That LA didn't use a motor. But he's still not contrite. Not sure why he feels he has to play the victim card. What does it matter that others are still doping? Why not just apologize, and move on? The pettiness is really offputting.
Bolder
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