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Badzilla, the disease of champions

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18 Jul 2013 01:52

This piece on treatment and follow up may give some credence to the official position,especially if he has been infected for a long period before diagnosis.
It does mention follow ups at 36 months and possible though not automatic retreatment.

http://www.snp.com.au/media/160501/schistosomiasis.pdf

TREATMENT
Praziquantel (Biltricide) 20 mg/kg bodyweight every 4 hours for
2 to 3 doses depending upon the species is recommended. In
travellers, this is likely to achieve cure rates in the order of 90%.
Tablets are scored and available as a 600 mg dose dispensed 6
per pack. In patients at risk of chronic disease, such as refugees
and migrants, it is important to be aware of complications that
may arise from chronic infection: liver fibrosis, portal hypertension
and its sequelae, and colorectal malignancy in the intestinal forms;
obstructive uropathy, superimposed bacterial infection, infertility
and possibly bladder cancer in the urinary form.
FOLLOW-UP
Follow-up Schistosomiasis serology is recommended in 12 to 36
months after treatment. Follow-up serology may differ between
immigrants and returned travellers. Travellers may show a more
rapid serological decline post-treatment due to a shorter duration of
infection and lower parasite burden. Immigrants may even show a
rise in titre within the first 6 to12 months post-treatment. Persisting
titres should not automatically justify retreatment, this should be
based on symptoms, parasite identification or eosinophilia. Viable
eggs may continue to be excreted for up to one month after
successful treatment. Non-viable and degenerate eggs can be
found in tissue biopsies for years after infection has occurred.
Stradebianche
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18 Jul 2013 01:54

Guys who are quoting from articles or other websites in this thread:
Can you please go back & edit your posts to also include a link to the article itself? It's helpful to be able to bring up the original article to see its date, authorship, context, etc. I believe forum rules say that we are supposed to always include a link alongside any lengthy quotes anyway.

These various stories are so inconsistent, it would be nice to be able to see if there's some sort of pattern among the articles themselves.
Beech Mtn
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18 Jul 2013 01:55

ChewbaccaD wrote:One of the greatest thread titles in forum history.


Cool story bro.....
¨Inspiration is a fine ally, but a fatal master¨
rata de sentina
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18 Jul 2013 02:54

Merckx index wrote:I'll of course defer to your actual experience with the disease, but according to all the sources I have seen, it requires a single annual treatment. The disease is controlled, not eliminated. E.g., this is what it says in the link provided by Cycle Chic. I believe Froome has also been quoted as saying he's treated every six months.


Im way out of my league here and probably late to the party (this is from the other thread) but was the link you looked at the "Carter centre"?

If so that link was a bit ambiguous. It goes under the title "how to treat Bilharzia" but it is clearly aimed at people who live in areas where the disease is common and in the same section they talk about mass treatment even if only a % have the disease. So I think that page may have been aimed at helping those who live under constant risk of infection and reinfection rather than at someone like Froome who is no longer facing that risk.

And of course the Carter centre is all about helping poor local populations.

I suppose patswana confirmed that annual dosage was for those who face the danger of reinfection but if what i posted above makes sense then perhaps the Carter foundation isn't contradicting people here as some may have thought.
The Hitch: Winner 2013 Vuelta cq game. Winner, Velorooms prediction game 2012, 2013. 2nd all time cq rankings.
The Father of Clean Cycling, Christophe Bassons wrote:When I look at cycling today, I get the impression that history is repeating itself: riders who are supposed to be rouleurs are climbing passes at the front of the race, and those who are supposed to be climbers are riding time trials at more than 50 kilometres per hour.

The story is beginning again, just as it did 14 years ago


journalist with integrity.
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18 Jul 2013 03:16

Stradebianche wrote:Interesting piece in the Independent pre tour brings up a couple of new statements.

http://www.independent.co.uk/sport/cycling/tour-de-france-wait-over-for-favourite-chris-froome-8679516.html

"It has not always been so smooth a journey for the 28-year-old rider. His initial season at Sky was erratic, limited by the recurrence of bilharzia, a waterborne virus he had picked up on a childhood fishing trip in Kenya, where he was born to an English father, Clive, and his late mother Jane. Its impact on his training was at first not realised and it was only after a visit home that he received proper treatment.

“It feeds on red blood cells so your immune system is always lower, your recovery is not as fast,” says Froome. “I would do a hard training day and I would be absolutely nailed at the end of it. I would get a cold that lasted for weeks until I stopped training completely and then had to start all over again. I found myself stuck in this cycle, so in a way it was a relief when I found that I had it.”

He returns every six months to Africa for a course of treatment – the last was in January and the next will be straight after the Tour. The treatment is harsh and wipes him out for a day or two. There will be some tightly crossed fingers – not a usual Sky approach – that the disease does not make the untimeliest of returns in the next three weeks."


If he needs treatment twice a year, and it only prevents him from training for 1-2 days, and Sky is worried about it recurring during the TdF, why on Earth would they not have had him get his last treatment a month ago, or 2 months? Why wait until immediately after the Tour?
silverrocket
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18 Jul 2013 03:22

silverrocket wrote:If he needs treatment twice a year, and it only prevents him from training for 1-2 days, and Sky is worried about it recurring during the TdF, why on Earth would they not have had him get his last treatment a month ago, or 2 months? Why wait until immediately after the Tour?


Sounds like it made a return on both rest days. Treatment via a bag full of RBCs :rolleyes:

"You know, I didn't expect to win today, but I did"
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18 Jul 2013 03:38

silverrocket wrote:If he needs treatment twice a year, and it only prevents him from training for 1-2 days, and Sky is worried about it recurring during the TdF, why on Earth would they not have had him get his last treatment a month ago, or 2 months? Why wait until immediately after the Tour?


Read the first post on this thread. IMHO, it checks out good.

I will give Froome some room here. Somethings don't get transcribed well in interviews especially between two or more non-medical people discussing medical things. But, unless he is seeking out the ponds and swimming in them for the express purpose of catching the disease, he was cured after initial treatment phase.

End of story.

This is shaping up to be second only to Hamilton's ephemeral twin explanation.
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18 Jul 2013 03:49

thehog wrote:Sounds like it made a return on both rest days. Treatment via a bag full of RBCs :rolleyes:

"You know, I didn't expect to win today, but I did"


Could we keep this serious? Nothings stopping you from making the same post in the Froome thread where those you seek to antagonize can have their back and forth with you without necessarily distrupting a more serious discussion.
The Hitch: Winner 2013 Vuelta cq game. Winner, Velorooms prediction game 2012, 2013. 2nd all time cq rankings.
The Father of Clean Cycling, Christophe Bassons wrote:When I look at cycling today, I get the impression that history is repeating itself: riders who are supposed to be rouleurs are climbing passes at the front of the race, and those who are supposed to be climbers are riding time trials at more than 50 kilometres per hour.

The story is beginning again, just as it did 14 years ago


journalist with integrity.
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18 Jul 2013 03:54

Stradebianche wrote:Non-viable and degenerate eggs can be
found in tissue biopsies for years after infection has occurred.


This would be the cover story to hit the oxygen vector doping and go zoooom!
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18 Jul 2013 03:59

The Hitch wrote:Could we keep this serious? Nothings stopping you from making the same post in the Froome thread where those you seek to antagonize can have their back and forth with you without necessarily distrupting a more serious discussion.


There is irony in my post. The disease appears to allow for "treatment". That to me is very interesting. Is treatment, doping.

Besides I came up either the term "Badzhilla".

Steady on.
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18 Jul 2013 07:28

The Hitch wrote:Im way out of my league here and probably late to the party (this is from the other thread) but was the link you looked at the "Carter centre"?

If so that link was a bit ambiguous. It goes under the title "how to treat Bilharzia" but it is clearly aimed at people who live in areas where the disease is common and in the same section they talk about mass treatment even if only a % have the disease. So I think that page may have been aimed at helping those who live under constant risk of infection and reinfection rather than at someone like Froome who is no longer facing that risk.

And of course the Carter centre is all about helping poor local populations.

I suppose patswana confirmed that annual dosage was for those who face the danger of reinfection but if what i posted above makes sense then perhaps the Carter foundation isn't contradicting people here as some may have thought.


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Schistosomiasis

Yes the wiki page for Schistosomiasis states 'Schistosomiasis is readily treated using a single oral dose of the drug praziquantel annually.[14]'

But the footnote reference is to the Carter Institute page http://web.archive.org/web/20080225084801/http://www.cartercenter.org/health/schistosomiasis/treatment.html

which states 'A single oral annual dose of this medicine will prevent a child from suffering from schistosomiasis.'

As I understand it, in areas where the disease is very common, where the infection and re-infection rate is generally high, it is cheaper and more efficient to give people an annual dose as a preventative measure, rather than test people for it and then treat them, so this is a method of prevention or pre-emptive 'treatment', which is not a treatment at all.

The Carter Institute is not involved in the treatment of those who visit areas like Kenya, but rather helping those who live in areas where the infection rate is very high.
bewildered
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18 Jul 2013 07:36

bewildered wrote:http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Schistosomiasis

Yes the wiki page for Schistosomiasis states 'Schistosomiasis is readily treated using a single oral dose of the drug praziquantel annually.[14]'

But the footnote reference is to the Carter Institute page http://web.archive.org/web/20080225084801/http://www.cartercenter.org/health/schistosomiasis/treatment.html

which states 'A single oral annual dose of this medicine will prevent a child from suffering from schistosomiasis.'

As I understand it, in areas where the disease is very commone, where the infection and re-infection rate is generally high, it is cheaper and more efficient to give people an annual dose as a preventative measure, rather than test people for it and then treat them, so this is a method of prevention or pre-emptive 'treatment', which is not a treatment at all.

The Carter Institute is not involved in the treatment of those who visit areas like Kenya, but rather helping those who live in areas where the infection rate is very high.


So, while Froome's statements are inconsistent with actual medical knowledge, they are consistent with Wikipedia. Seems to me the whole badzilla thing is a smokescreen hastily cobbled together from half-read Wiki pages to cover up something else entirely.
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18 Jul 2013 07:43

Mr.38%
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18 Jul 2013 08:39

Been saying the same things of the OP since the very first time I heard about Froome and bilharzia.

I used to work with political refugees coming from Africa and some of them had caught bilharzia in the previous months. As mentioned before, it's a one day treatment. You get half of the dose in the morning, half in the afternoon. The body does not suffer any particular side effect. I witnessed guys treated for bilharzia being able to run and play football the day after.

There have been cases of recurrence of the parasite. They are rare but can happen after approximately one year. Needless to say, if you know a person has had bilharzia before it's very easy to spot the symptoms or keep the situation in check even if there's no visible symptom. Another one day treatment will kill the parasite again anyway.
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18 Jul 2013 10:41



Only had time for a quick glance at this,so please correct me if i have read this wrong.

One thing immediately stands out and that is that this study seems to show that bilharzia had no effect on RBC's.In fact the RBC's in the infected subject are higher than the control subject whilst other parameters are lower ?

Have we not been told that this is a "red blood cell munching" disease ?
Stradebianche
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18 Jul 2013 11:08

Stradebianche wrote:Interesting piece in the Independent pre tour brings up a couple of new statements.

http://www.independent.co.uk/sport/cycling/tour-de-france-wait-over-for-favourite-chris-froome-8679516.html

<snip>
<snip>

He returns every six months to Africa for a course of treatment – the last was in January and the next will be straight after the Tour. The treatment is harsh and wipes him out for a day or two. There will be some tightly crossed fingers – not a usual Sky approach – that the disease does not make the untimeliest of returns in the next three weeks."


Is it really necessary to go to Africa to get it treated?
"He returns every six months to Africa for a course of treatment"

As people who live in Europe could be affected while in Africa, wouldn't it be possible to be treated in Europe. I would guess that a city like London would be have a few doses in stock.
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18 Jul 2013 11:11

Froomstrong wrote:Is it really necessary to go to Africa to get it treated?
"He returns every six months to Africa for a course of treatment"

As people who live in Europe could be affected while in Africa, wouldn't it be possible to be treated in Europe. I would guess that a city like London would be have a few doses in stock.


My thoughts exactly !
Stradebianche
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18 Jul 2013 11:21

[double post]
Jahudor
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18 Jul 2013 11:23

Froomstrong wrote:Is it really necessary to go to Africa to get it treated?
"He returns every six months to Africa for a course of treatment"

As people who live in Europe could be affected while in Africa, wouldn't it be possible to be treated in Europe. I would guess that a city like London would be have a few doses in stock.


Very strange and dodgy indeed. It isn't necessary to receive treatment in Africa of course, but I guess Froome would claim to visit his family also.

Supposedly he can't train during and shortly after 'treatment', so I guess UCI wouldn't perform a out of competition control while he is in Kenya! We should try to find out how long he stays there for his treatments. During those periods he is free from any controls.
Jahudor
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19 Jul 2013 10:02

You can receive treatment for bilharzia in Milano so I presume you could get it in most major cities in Europe.
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