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Building A Cycling Bookshelf

Discuss your experiences road riding, share knowledge or other general road cycling topics. A doping discussion free forum.

Moderators: Irondan, Eshnar, Red Rick, Valv.Piti, Pricey_sky, Tonton, King Boonen

14 Jun 2012 17:01

nvpacchi wrote:Just pre-ordered new Gino Bartali book scheduled for release in about a week. First book about Bartali written in English, very excited for it!

http://roadtovalorbook.com/


Excerpt from Road to Valor: http://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/2012/writers/the_bonus/06/11/road.to.valor/index.html?eref=sihp&sct=hp_bf3_a2
User avatar El Oso
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14 Jun 2012 17:22

I read Matt Seaton's book "The Escape Artist" recently and its a brilliant book. Matt is a journalist for the guardian but was a keen amateur racer when in his 20s. The book is about how cycling culture and family life mix together or not as the case may be. It's a great read for those who enjoy cycling but quite frankly it stands on its own as a brilliant insight into personal grief.

I would also recommend "The Hour" by Michael Hutchinson. Oddly the author is also a journalist for the guardian and a keen amateur time trialist (he has competed at the commonwealths and recently won the British 25mile TT champs beating alex dowsett into second). The book is about his failed attempt at the hour record.

Both book really benefit from being written by the author himself. Gives a real insight to bike fans and are both very open to general readers.
williamp78
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14 Jun 2012 21:13

elapid wrote:OK, so how did people on this thread get their hands on "Eddy Merckx: The Cannibal" by Daniel Friebe?

Amazon (US) have just cancelled my order because they are unable to obtain the book, and Chapters (Canada) do not have the book until the release date on 25th September 2012.

Any help would be much appreciated!


hit ebay...punch in "merckx" and some bookseller in england sent me mine...like 28 bucks including postage I think and got here quickly...
The Gnome
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15 Jun 2012 00:34

fmk_RoI wrote:Looking for suggestions for a cycling bookshelf. I write book reviews and related rubbish for Podium Cafe but actually have the oddest bikes' book shelf, missing lots of stuff it should have. So what do you think are the must read books every cyclist should have on their bookshelf, and are there any should read books most people aren't aware of?


I don't know if this would fit on your bookshelf, but I have about seven years of Cycle Sport magazines collecting dust (~2000 to ~2007). If you pay for postage they are yours. If anybody else is interested, the offer stands.
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04 Jul 2012 23:43

Is anyone reading the RIIS book? Stages of Light and Dark

Any reviews? TY

Currenty reading on my Kindle:

Team 7-Eleven: How an Unsung Band of American Cyclists Took on the World-just finished

We Were Young and Carefree
One Way Road: The Autobiography of Robbie McEwen
Belgian Hammer

Nickel
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05 Jul 2012 01:20

nickel999 wrote:Is anyone reading the RIIS book? Stages of Light and Dark

Any reviews? TY

Currenty reading on my Kindle:

Team 7-Eleven: How an Unsung Band of American Cyclists Took on the World-just finished

We Were Young and Carefree
One Way Road: The Autobiography of Robbie McEwen
Belgian Hammer

Nickel


I just read the Riis book on my Kindle. I wasn't yet a fan of cycling during the time that Riis rode, so I didn't have any strong feelings one way or the other about him. I enjoyed the book. It was well written and seemed honest. He came across as a more likable person than I would have thought from reading recent articles about him. I know Riis is not the most popular person in the cycling world, but the book is worth reading.
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05 Jul 2012 10:13

Thank you Irongrl

The RIIS book sounds like a good next read on my Kindle.
nickel999
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03 Sep 2012 19:01

So, Poetry. Cycling and. Anyone got any recs for (good) poems that are specifically about the sporting side of cycling? http://www.podiumcafe.com/2012/9/3/3288676/ten-poems-about-bicycles-edited-by-jenny-swann
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15 Sep 2012 18:40

no poems to recommend, i'm afraid, but read Richard Moore's "The Dirtiest Race in History" last week. Ok, it's athletics, not cycling, but very good read all the same.

Also read Joe Parkin's "Dog in a Hat" and "Come and Gone". Dog in a Hat was great, Come and Gone not as good but worth a read.
my username is flish
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16 Sep 2012 01:10

fmk_RoI wrote:So, Poetry. Cycling and. Anyone got any recs for (good) poems that are specifically about the sporting side of cycling? http://www.podiumcafe.com/2012/9/3/3288676/ten-poems-about-bicycles-edited-by-jenny-swann


I see this thread has come back alive. At first, I had forgotten the thread, and I thought "Wonderful! I love cycling and I love books!". But, I had forgotten that I had already replied to this thread. Now, I will apologize for using the word "idiot" in my first reply to this thread, and to you. But the rest of what I said is still valid, and worth repeating. Forester is a must read for any serious cyclist, but I will qualify this to add, who grew up in a non-cycling country. In other words, probably every single person on this earth outside of the Netherlands, and maybe Belgium. I don't know about Belgium, never been there. But I know what Forester wrote is applicable in China - where bicycles were THE main mechanical transportation just a few years ago, and may still be.

But, maybe what you really want is books about bicycle racing. Not about bicycling? If that is that case, then say so. Don't beat around the bush. And change the title of the thread.

It's not just Forester, not at all. What about Kurmanskie? What about "Mom, Can I Ride My Bike Across America?" - I had to laugh at the person who said the would rather undergo torture before reading another Josie Dew book, but what about Josie Dew? She added significantly to the BICYCLING bookshelf. But she didn't add a jot to the BICYCLE RACING bookshelf.

You want to talk about cycling? Why not Jobst Brandt's book? For that matter, why not Sheldon Brown's html pages? They aren't a book, but they ARE reading material. Brings me back to this - are you asking for a bicycling bookshelf, or a bicycle racing bookshelf. A ton of difference.
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19 Sep 2012 01:46

I really enjoyed "Slaying the Badger" by Richard Moore. Great insights into the LeMond / Hinault rivalry, and unlike alot of other books on great cyclists, the author has had direct access to both riders for this book.
nztayls
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19 Sep 2012 08:06

nztayls wrote:I really enjoyed "Slaying the Badger" by Richard Moore. Great insights into the LeMond / Hinault rivalry, and unlike alot of other books on great cyclists, the author has had direct access to both riders for this book.


Moore did a top job with that one, really is a class read.

Have you paired it with Fignon's biog yet? If not, you should.
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19 Sep 2012 08:13

my username is flish wrote:no poems to recommend, i'm afraid, but read Richard Moore's "The Dirtiest Race in History" last week. Ok, it's athletics, not cycling, but very good read all the same.

Also read Joe Parkin's "Dog in a Hat" and "Come and Gone". Dog in a Hat was great, Come and Gone not as good but worth a read.


Dirtiest Race is on the schedule, once I get through some more of the big pile of unread new cycling books on my desk (who knew cycling had suddenly got popular again?). Looking forward to reading it, generally enjoy Moore (with one exception).

Can't say as I got Parkin. I mean, I read the first one but it did nothing for me. Do you have to be American to get it?
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20 Sep 2012 12:49

no you fuppin' don't, I'm from Dublin aswell.
my username is flish
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21 Sep 2012 16:11

You need a bike with a personal touch contact us: https://www.facebook.com/pages/Dragon-Custom/362658100458368
Dragon Custom
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14 Oct 2012 03:28

irongrl wrote:I just read the Riis book on my Kindle. I wasn't yet a fan of cycling during the time that Riis rode, so I didn't have any strong feelings one way or the other about him. I enjoyed the book. It was well written and seemed honest. He came across as a more likable person than I would have thought from reading recent articles about him. I know Riis is not the most popular person in the cycling world, but the book is worth reading.


I am in the middle of it and it is very good...I am not a big Riis fan...but the book is pretty interesting and worth reading...the Bartali book likewise is pretty good...Roches book as well I found a good read...
The Gnome
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Book

21 Jan 2013 16:11

Is.... 'From Lance to Landis: Inside the American Doping Controversy' by David Walsh

the same as

'Seven Deadly Sins My Pursuit of Lance Armstrong' ???

I,ve read the Lance to Landis and wanted to know if its one and the same book.

thanks
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16 May 2013 20:05

I never knew until today that Kelly's autobiography is about to be released in the next month or so. This was discussed between himself and Quigley in the Eurosport commentary.

It should be an interesting read.

http://pelotonpublishing.co.uk/sean-kelly-autobiography/

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Hunger-Sean-Kelly-Autobiography/dp/0956781438/ref=sr_1_74?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1366109946&sr=1-74&keywords=cycling
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25 May 2013 08:29

Any cycling bookshelf must include "Richard's Bicycle Book" by Richard Ballantine. Preferably one published before 1979 that includes the unabridged section on how to handle unruly dogs that one might encounter. I have rarely laughed so much at anything in a book. His advice is out there to say the least and must be read to be believed.
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26 May 2013 17:26

fmk_RoI wrote: . . .
Can't say as I got Parkin. I mean, I read the first one but it did nothing for me. Do you have to be American to get it?


I wouldn't think so, but his follow-up books were not as good as Dog in a Hat - which is not a great book, imo, but is interesting as a window into a particular place and time. Imo, Dog in a Hat is a recommendable read - perhaps a B- effort? But I could see how the writing style might not scan for lots of readers.
It is of great use to the sailor to know the length of his line, though he cannot with it fathom all the depths of the ocean. ~ John Locke
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