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When you started riding, could you do 330 miles in 2 days?

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When you started riding, could you do 330 miles in 2 days?

21 Feb 2016 09:22

Asking because Dan Bilzerian is going to try it.

(yes the poker playing, instagramming, Dan Bilzerian)

For $600K, with only 30 days to get fit.

And even better, Lance has stepped forward to help him.

Full Story

So, when you first started riding, could you honestly have managed 330 miles in two days? (He's post heart attack too for some idea of what a task this could be)
AJ101
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21 Feb 2016 16:35

If a person already has good basic fitness and the route is flat with little wind, I don't see why not.
Be fully rested before starting, go slow (approx 10 mph), eat and drink plenty, have a comfortable bike and SEAT, and have companions to 'pass the time'.
It would be boring, but doable unless injury occured.

Jay Kosta
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Re: When you started riding, could you do 330 miles in 2 day

21 Feb 2016 17:05

He could do it on a velodrome - no hills - no need to not allow other riders on the track at the same time.
avanti
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Re: When you started riding, could you do 330 miles in 2 day

21 Feb 2016 20:17

avanti wrote:He could do it on a velodrome - no hills - no need to not allow other riders on the track at the same time.


Er? - from LA to Vegas on a velodrome?

I know the question is whether "you could do it" but the velodrome idea is beside the point.
User avatar wrinklyvet
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Re: When you started riding, could you do 330 miles in 2 day

22 Feb 2016 16:47

Ahhhh, what the heck. I think he could do it but at the end his neck, shoulders, back and butt are going to hurt. Well worth $600K.
dhungerf
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22 Feb 2016 17:13

Hmm before I started to test myself on a loan race bike last year at bought myself a Trek last month I used to ride Tours of 90-110 kilometers on my Holland bike. But even that came not out of nowhere.

Now I realized or feel that I maybe missed the ideal point to switch over to a race bike in about 2012. As I need to slowly bulit up now. Altough I still can do ~90 kilometers on my Holland bike and ~120 kilometers on a race bike if in at least decent shape.

My first high cadence basic miles on Saturday hurt like **** nevermind. And I'm miles away from the level other cyclists here and on the streets got. Although my basic level is probably very sharp for a not fully outtrained cyclist.

It's all about the passion I would say. Don't dream too high and hurt yourself mentally and physically then. Set yourself realistic goals. There ain't no need to train like some superb guys here, or in local cycling clubs do.

Ride with passion, train with passion. Once you find out that on a bike, rain & pain can't decrease your enjoyment as long as you not bonk: Ride and train harder, more enthusiastic and more professional. But it's all about the passion as long as you're not a pro or a good amateur who wants to get race results. That might come. But later. First you need to love your hobby and passion, because it should make you happy.

After all even a pro like Moncoutie mainly “trained“ with pleasure rides through the parks, over the cols, through the landscape. And he still won the KOM classification of the Vuelta multiple times!
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25 Feb 2016 09:12

I think it is hard for me, even for $600K. I am new in cycling and need some time to get accustomed to it. Hurting badly is not good for me cause it may make me lose interest in cycling. Besides, I hope to engage myself in cycling gradually, not to the extreme at a time. So for me ,the answer is no.
Kiki
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Re: When you started riding, could you do 330 miles in 2 day

01 Mar 2016 19:53

The answer is: not me, because I started riding at a very early age. As an adult, if I stopped for 6 months, have a couple of rides to shake the rust off, that wouldn't be too hard. I think that any adult in good shape can do it, at a slow pace with someone to talk to, and lots of food/fluids. Getting back on the saddle the morning of day 2 will be a real pain in the *** tho' :D . I doubt that Dan will ever want to ride a bike again. But again, when you see people pulling stupid stunts for free, at least he'll get a nice chunk of cash out of it.
SOLO LA VITTORIA È BELLA
User avatar Tonton
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Re: When you started riding, could you do 330 miles in 2 day

02 Mar 2016 01:58

AJ101 wrote:So, when you first started riding, could you honestly have managed 330 miles in two days? (He's post heart attack too for some idea of what a task this could be)


For $600k yes, probably back then even for a bet against someone just for the sake of it. Now, wouldn't ride that far if I wasn't getting paid. On second thought would probably do it for a charity ride.
Night Rider
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Re: When you started riding, could you do 330 miles in 2 day

02 Mar 2016 04:17

Nope But 329 was doable
User avatar Boeing
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21 Mar 2016 00:47

It's an interesting challenge, that's for sure, and an interesting puzzle to ponder. According to some websites, it's actually 320 miles, but let's go with 330 for the sake of discussion. If he is going to succeed, this thing is going to require careful planning.

Let's start by splitting the distance, 330 miles (~531 kilometers) in half: 165 miles (~266 kilometers) for each day.
The first day is going to be key for this guy. If he can manage that, his chances of completing the second day are vastly improved.

On a road bike, rider weight is distributed equally on three points: saddle, pedals, and handlebar. Maintaining this distribution of weight requires some effort. As the rider begins to tire, less weight is put on the handlebar and pedals, and more weight is taken by the saddle.

Let's say he maintains an average pace of between 12.5 and 13.5 miles per hour (20-22 kph). (Actually rather generous in this case, considering that the route will necessitate quite a bit of climbing.) At that rate he will be in the saddle for between 12.2 and 13.2 hours. (If he rides at 10 mph, as someone else suggested, he would be in saddle for 16.5 hours.) I'd give a reasonably fit, motivated, enthusiastic non-cyclist about four to six hours in the saddle before he begins to flag.

At six hours he is less than half way through his day. Around that time, if not before, he will increasingly feel his shoulders and neck beginning to cramp, his hands and feet beginning to burn, and his bum subject to increasing pain. What was earlier a road bike now becomes a medieval torture device. What follows is six to eight hours of increasingly severe torture, which is a sure recipe for failure. And we haven't even got through day one.

What he really needs before he starts, in order to prevent this, is miles in his legs. For this reason I have prepared a periodized training schedule. He needs to stairstep his way to 165 miles, so that by the time he gets there and needs to do it, he has reasonable assurance that he can do it.

For someone of his age and likely condition, it would be best if he could train three days on, one off; or, even better, three or four on and two off, over many weeks. But with thirty days to prepare, there isn't time for that. Instead, then, I start him out with three on, one off, and then from there go four on, one off. The final week in training is very light with lots of rest, so that his body has time to adapt and he arrives fresh.

I assume that as a heart patient he will have medical supervision. I also assume that with this medical supervision - and with Lance Armstrong at his side - he will have certain, erm, recovery aids. Frankly, there is no way he can do this without medical assistance, given his age and status as a non-cyclist. (And rather than hiring Armstrong, he'd have been much better served by hiring Dr. Ferrari.) Here is his thirty day training schedule (it begins in April, and his ride starts March 31, but just pretend the schedule began on March 1):

Image

The only thing that gives me real pause about this extremely aggressive schedule is week three, where I have him doing, effectively, six centuries+ in seven days. But I am relying here on the miracles of medical science for recovery - about which we won't say any more since this is not in the Clinic.

Assuming he has scouted his route, has a good support wagon and support riders, has completed all the necessary preparation, and followed a training schedule similar to this one, I'd rate his chances of success as quite high. If he's going to wing it, on the other hand, try to tough it out through sheer macho - and if he is prohibited from hitching a ride on the sag wagon - then I predict he will fail. So we will see if he succeeds or fails, and how he prepared or didn't.

PS. If anyone here with real expertise in periodized training has any corrective suggestions, or better ideas, I'd be happy to hear them.
2016: Year of the Red Fire Monkey
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Re:

26 Mar 2016 19:10

Maxiton wrote:Image


As I said above, I have my doubts about this training schedule, and a friend who rides agreed, saying that in his opinion it doesn't allow sufficient time for recovery before Bilzerian's big ride. With this in mind, then, and with a bit of new info at hand, I have some new ideas.

I read in an article recently (which I can't seem to find now) that during training Bilzerian had ridden 54 miles (~89 k) in 4.5 hours. That comes out to 12 mph (~19 kph).

Given that he has 48 hours to work with, who says he has to do it all in two parts? What might work much better is to divide the 330 mile (~531 km) distance into four parts of 82.5 miles (~133 km) each. 82.5 miles is a lot more manageable than 165.

If he can maintain his 12 mph pace, he will cover 82.5 miles in ~6.88 hours. For the sake of slop let's call it 7 hours. If he manages to do that over the whole trip, he will cover the distance in 28 hours. This leaves 20 hours for rest and recuperation. If we divide this figure by three, each of his R&R periods is ~6.7 hours. So, he has roughly the same time off the bike as he has on.

During his R&R he can receive medical attention, have a massage and a light meal, sleep for about five hours, have another light meal, and head out.

This plan is a lot more feasible, and it also allows for an improved training plan. In our periodized training we arrive at 85 miles on day thirteen. Since that is roughly the distance he will cover at any one time, we can stop there. This leaves us seventeen days for rest, adaptation, and maintenance.

Image

After day thirteen in training, I would probably give him two rest days, and then have him do progressively increasing tempo rides every other day for maintenance, working his way up to 40 miles or so. And in the final week increased rest days and short tempo rides.

Bilzerian says in this article that he plans to ride for two or three hours at a time and take breaks. This will prove to be a huge mistake. It doesn't allow time for sufficient sleep, for one thing, and for another he will cool down during his break time, making his return to riding excruciatingly painful. My plan is, I think, much more sensible from the standpoint of sports physiology, and greatly increases his chance of success.
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User avatar Maxiton
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Re: When you started riding, could you do 330 miles in 2 day

29 Mar 2016 20:02

I have no idea who this guy is, but if he has spent his life in a chair playing poker without any form of exercise, there is no way in hell he could do it; not without hiring Nibali's driver for assistance. No way.
Maxiton: Please forward your schedule to whats-his-face and ask for a cut of the dough if he makes it. Then give me a cut of your cut for making the suggestion.
Thanks in advance.
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Re: When you started riding, could you do 330 miles in 2 day

29 Mar 2016 22:00

the delgados wrote:I have no idea who this guy is, but if he has spent his life in a chair playing poker without any form of exercise, there is no way in hell he could do it; not without hiring Nibali's driver for assistance. No way.
Maxiton: Please forward your schedule to whats-his-face and ask for a cut of the dough if he makes it. Then give me a cut of your cut for making the suggestion.
Thanks in advance.


He's an ex-Navy Seal, apparently, and also has money to burn. I'd never heard of him either, before this. He is almost surely very tough, and has better conditioning than most. I've thought about creating a Twitter account just so I can point him to this training and ride planning advice. But mostly I did it for fun, and anyway his ride is in two days. :)
2016: Year of the Red Fire Monkey
User avatar Maxiton
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Re: When you started riding, could you do 330 miles in 2 day

30 Mar 2016 04:44

Maxiton wrote:
the delgados wrote:I have no idea who this guy is, but if he has spent his life in a chair playing poker without any form of exercise, there is no way in hell he could do it; not without hiring Nibali's driver for assistance. No way.
Maxiton: Please forward your schedule to whats-his-face and ask for a cut of the dough if he makes it. Then give me a cut of your cut for making the suggestion.
Thanks in advance.


He's an ex-Navy Seal, apparently, and also has money to burn. I'd never heard of him either, before this. He is almost surely very tough, and has better conditioning than most. I've thought about creating a Twitter account just so I can point him to this training and ride planning advice. But mostly I did it for fun, and anyway his ride is in two days. :)


He's not an ex-Navy Seal at all, he was kicked out of training because they deemed his character not to be upto to standard
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31 Mar 2016 18:26

Looks like he completed a ride, but not quite the one advertised. Instead of riding LA to Vegas, as purportedly planned, he rode Vegas to LA - so he was descending instead of climbing. He did most of it on a recumbent, drafting behind his support van. Both the recumbent and the drafting were apparently permitted by the rules agreed upon.

Image

All in all, then, pretty lame. Fun - and funny - but nonetheless lame.

Edit: Of course, if he read this I'm sure he would say, "Yeah, but you know what's not lame? $600,000." :D
2016: Year of the Red Fire Monkey
User avatar Maxiton
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Re:

01 Apr 2016 16:57

Maxiton wrote:Looks like he completed a ride, but not quite the one advertised. Instead of riding LA to Vegas, as purportedly planned, he rode Vegas to LA - so he was descending instead of climbing. He did most of it on a recumbent, drafting behind his support van. Both the recumbent and the drafting were apparently permitted by the rules agreed upon.

Image

All in all, then, pretty lame. Fun - and funny - but nonetheless lame.

Edit: Of course, if he read this I'm sure he would say, "Yeah, but you know what's not lame? $600,000." :D


....hahaha that episode should now be put into The Gordian Knot file...and lame ?, have to humbly disagree, from my seat that was brilliantly played....and the moral of the story I suppose is never give a sucker an even break.....

Cheers
User avatar blutto
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20 Sep 2016 02:41

The guy strikes me as being particularly repellent, based on his social media feeds anyway. Maybe riding a bike will make him a better human.
chuckmicD
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20 Sep 2016 17:57

Borderline pathetic. I wouldn't be surprised if not only he paid a visit to Ferrari, he also had fishing line between him and the van.
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