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Bike Stranded

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Bike Stranded

31 Aug 2016 18:02

Hey guys i was wondering about the ways of transportation when you got your bike with you but can't ride it, the other day while i was cruising i got a flat tired and i needed to stop riding and I had to take a Drive back home. Have you experienced something similar?
GeorgeCurios
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Re: Bike Stranded

01 Sep 2016 12:50

I carry tools and parts to repair almost any normal break-down. Also, the bike should come apart fairly easily to fit into most cars.

List of what I carry on the bike:
Multi-Tool
Spare Tube (2X)
Patch kit
Chain Tool
Quick Link
Tire levers
Pump
dhungerf
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Re: Bike Stranded

01 Sep 2016 14:30

Any typical rode bike or mountain bike should be transportable in virtually any auto.

Remove front wheel. May need to loose stem at steer tube to turn handlebars.

If venturing any distance from base, carry allen wrenches, tube and air source, I recommend tire tool
also.

Any specialty bike ie. cruisers,fat bikes etc may prove a bit more challenging.
climb4fun
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Re: Bike Stranded

02 Sep 2016 11:36

GeorgeCurios wrote:Hey guys i was wondering about the ways of transportation when you got your bike with you but can't ride it, the other day while i was cruising i got a flat tired and i needed to stop riding and I had to take a Drive back home. Have you experienced something similar?


No tire lever, tube, patch kit, pump? Poor preflight.
User avatar Bustedknuckle
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Location: USofA

03 Sep 2016 08:07

I've had a sidewall cut that was too bad to repair on the road, but luckily I carry a spare tubular with me when I ride.
User avatar 42x16ss
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Location: Brisbane, Aus

03 Sep 2016 19:26

When I first starting riding I carried 2 spare tubes, levers and a pump....no patch kit.

One solo ride I Punctured 3 times!! (yeah...same piece of glass 3 times....didn't know back then to remove the tyre and check the rubber thoroughly)

Had to call a Taxi to come get me and take me home.

Something you only do once :D
User avatar JackRabbitSlims
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Re:

04 Sep 2016 07:43

JackRabbitSlims wrote:When I first starting riding I carried 2 spare tubes, levers and a pump....no patch kit.

One solo ride I Punctured 3 times!! (yeah...same piece of glass 3 times....didn't know back then to remove the tyre and check the rubber thoroughly)

Had to call a Taxi to come get me and take me home.

Something you only do once :D

Ouch! Self adhesive patches are lifesavers, can even save you when your clincher tyre gets a cut.
User avatar 42x16ss
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Location: Brisbane, Aus

04 Sep 2016 19:38

If you live in the USA and have a non-fixable mechanical on a bike ride I understand that AAA will now help. you.
avanti
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Location: At 1,585 m elevation

10 Sep 2016 22:13

i say:
Spare Tube (Double X)
Patch kit
Chain Tool
Tire levers
Pump
sarafereder
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Location: London

11 Apr 2017 10:01

i think these are enough:
Multi-Tool
Patch kit
Quick Link
Tire levers
Pump
trrxreza
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Re:

26 Apr 2017 11:58

42x16ss wrote:I've had a sidewall cut that was too bad to repair on the road, but luckily I carry a spare tubular with me when I ride.
A banknote can be used to get you home with a split tyre - particularly the plastic ones in some countries. Got me home once.
sienna
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Location: australia

26 Apr 2017 18:32

You can get really cheap breakdown cover for bikes in Britain. It costs less than £20 a year. They won't the you home if its not near but they will pick you up 24 hours a day and take you to a public transport hub or a hotel.

Otherwise yeah, carry multitool, tube(s), patches, pump. Most things can be covered by this.
mcduff
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Re: Re:

28 Apr 2017 05:55

sienna wrote:
42x16ss wrote:I've had a sidewall cut that was too bad to repair on the road, but luckily I carry a spare tubular with me when I ride.
A banknote can be used to get you home with a split tyre - particularly the plastic ones in some countries. Got me home once.

It's a bit easier with clinchers than tubulars ;)
User avatar 42x16ss
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28 Apr 2017 06:34

Its easier to change a (pre-glued) tub than it is a clincher and tube. Mind you, I put a bit of Orange seal in my tubs and that does the trick nicely.

Other than that, I've gone full tubeless for all but the race bike. Its especially great in winter
mcduff
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Re:

28 Apr 2017 12:38

mcduff wrote:Its easier to change a (pre-glued) tub than it is a clincher and tube. Mind you, I put a bit of Orange seal in my tubs and that does the trick nicely.

Once you know how to change a tub on the road you'll never go back. Sealants are getting really good too.
User avatar 42x16ss
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Re: Re:

22 Jul 2017 16:58

42x16ss wrote:
mcduff wrote:Its easier to change a (pre-glued) tub than it is a clincher and tube. Mind you, I put a bit of Orange seal in my tubs and that does the trick nicely.

Once you know how to change a tub on the road you'll never go back. Sealants are getting really good too.


Except that a freshly glued tub can't be trusted not to roll off, so you need to approach the rest of the ride with some caution. I used tubs for donkeys' years but wouldn't dream of using them for training now.
DL9999
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Re: Bike Stranded

22 Jul 2017 19:38

The only time I've ever had to walk home from a road ride (in about 280,000 km of riding) was the first time I cut the sidewall of a tyre. Lesson learned.

Now I always carry one spare inner tube, two tyre levers, a CO2 inflator and two 16g cartridges, and an old lip balm tube, emptied of all its customary apparatus and with a crisp bank note rolled gently inside it.

Image

If you cut a sidewall, the inner tube immediately will protrude through the slit and, no longer restrained by the tyre carcass, it will overexpand and burst. I carry the bank note in lieu of a spare clincher. A nice crisp note, wrapped radially around the replacement tube, will provide sufficient resistance to prevent the replacement tube also trying to escape through the slit in the tyre carcass. Rolled up inside the lip balm tube, the bank note will remain pristine and optimally 'stiff,' which is the key to its obstructing the tube's egress. And it's a reasonably safe method of carrying cash since few people would ever think to nick something that's had someone else's lips to it. Plus then you've always got a bob or two handy should you want to stop for a nice, hot cuppa.
Last edited by StyrbjornSterki on 24 Jul 2017 20:34, edited 1 time in total.
User avatar StyrbjornSterki
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Re:

22 Jul 2017 21:12

JackRabbitSlims wrote:....................
One solo ride I Punctured 3 times!! (yeah...same piece of glass 3 times....didn't know back then to remove the tyre and check the rubber thoroughly)
.................


I carry tweezers - big help in removing thorns from tires after a flat.
avanti
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Location: At 1,585 m elevation

Re: Bike Stranded

22 Jul 2017 21:30

StyrbjornSterki wrote:The only time I've ever had to walk home from a road ride (in about 280,000 km of riding) was the first time I cut the sidewall of a tyre. Lesson learned.

Now I always carry one spare inner tube, two tyre levers, a CO2 inflator and two 16g cartridges, and an old lip balm tube, emptied of all its customary apparatus and with a crisp bank note rolled gently inside it.

If you cut a sidewall, the inner tube immediately will protrude through the slit and, no longer restrained by the tyre carcass, it will overexpand and burst. I carry the bank note in lieu of a spare clincher. A nice crisp note, wrapped radially around the replacement tube, will provide sufficient resistance to prevent the replacement tube also trying to escape through the slit in the tyre carcass. Rolled up inside the lip balm tube, the bank note will remain pristine and optimally 'stiff,' which is the key to its obstructing the tube's egress. And it's a reasonably safe method of carrying cash since few people would ever think to nick something that's had someone else's lips to it. Plus then you've always got a bob or two handy should you want to stop for a nice, hot cuppa.


Hmmm...I'm gonna try that bank note idea. Thanks for sharing.
Skyline Drive
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User avatar Jspear
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24 Jul 2017 03:47

LOL, I started to read Styrbjorn’s post, and I thought the bank note was so he could buy something he needed to replace a tire. Clever use of money for sure.

I used to ride on tubulars, but as DL says, they aren’t really safe if the glue hasn’t set. It’s been a while, but I think after an emergency change on the road, I would be careful not to make any sharp turns. Now I use clinchers.

I’ve never gone anywhere on a bike without a pump, spare tube and tire levers (in the old days I used to use a couple of old spoons). If I’m going far afield I’ll take two spare tubes. I’ll sometimes take a patch kit, but only because it takes up so little space, and my bike bag’s a good place to put it so I always know where it is. I don’t expect to need it, and definitely don’t want to patch a leak on the road.

Now for something new in this thread: if I really want to cover all possibilities, and don’t mind carrying the extra weight, I’ll take a pair of rollerblades, or even one. They absolutely cannot get a flat, and they can take you great distances quite quickly. If you want to cut down on the weight, and aren’t using clip-on pedals, there are rollerblades with detachable wheel housing, so all you have to carry is that, while riding with the shoe portion. Of course, you will struggle somewhat on steep hills.
Merckx index
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