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Re:

17 Feb 2017 03:13

Tricycle Rider wrote:Downhill Racer (1969) - This is a blast from the past for those of you who skied or followed skiing back in the 60s and 70s, it's funny too see what was considered the most modern ski equipment, clothing, and waxing methods back then. (I'm sure a hundred years from now people will be laughing at our current methods.)

I love this movie (have seen it about half a dozen times now), for a sports movie it's actually pretty quiet. Love the scenery of the Alps and old world Europe, and the old cars... the interior decorating, hairstyles, music, and fashion were a bit ghastly, though. (Never dropped acid, but would think some of the inspirations came from having gone on trips.) Still, would highly recommend.

Redford's character makes me think of Bill Johnson and Bode Miller, btw., they, of course, came years later.


Entertaining movie that one. Redford and Gene Hackman were good as were the visuals. I liked the match race.
movingtarget
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Re: Re:

17 Feb 2017 03:24

Tricycle Rider wrote:
Bustedknuckle wrote:
Best sci-fi movie ever..next, 'Day the Earth Stood Still'..
Can't remember if I've seen The Day the Earth Stood Still (age, memory, and having seen too many movies in the past are failing me), I might want to give it a whirl.

Have you seen Quintet with Paul Newman? One film critic's review totally cracked me up... he said Quintet was Altman's nadir. lol!

Still love the flick, though, think I'll rent it again.


Altman did make some dodgy movies. I thought Quintet was okay. McCabe and Mrs Miller didn't do much for me. I liked MASH and Come Back To The Five and Dime Jimmy Dean but I have never seen Nashville which most people regard as his best. From what I have read about Altman he was a vicious drunk and not a very nice person and also a bit of a skinflint. If you are interested in movies from the 60s and 70s i read a good book by Peter Biskind called Easy Riders Raging Bulls which covered all of the big directors from those years including Scorsese, Altman, Spielberg and many others. Entertaining read and very interesting.
movingtarget
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Re: Re:

17 Feb 2017 04:04

movingtarget wrote:
Tricycle Rider wrote:
Bustedknuckle wrote:
Best sci-fi movie ever..next, 'Day the Earth Stood Still'..
Can't remember if I've seen The Day the Earth Stood Still (age, memory, and having seen too many movies in the past are failing me), I might want to give it a whirl.

Have you seen Quintet with Paul Newman? One film critic's review totally cracked me up... he said Quintet was Altman's nadir. lol!

Still love the flick, though, think I'll rent it again.


Altman did make some dodgy movies. I thought Quintet was okay. McCabe and Mrs Miller didn't do much for me. I liked MASH and Come Back To The Five and Dime Jimmy Dean but I have never seen Nashville which most people regard as his best. From what I have read about Altman he was a vicious drunk and not a very nice person and also a bit of a skinflint. If you are interested in movies from the 60s and 70s i read a good book by Peter Biskind called Easy Riders Raging Bulls which covered all of the big directors from those years including Scorsese, Altman, Spielberg and many others. Entertaining read and very interesting.
Yeah, but, but... what did you think of Gosford Park? (Personally I loved it, it was so understated I thought it was actually lovely.)

Back to sci-fi, and now we have the biggie called 2001: A Space Odyssey

Personally, I think it depends on what you're on at the time while watching - smoke a joint it's cool, but if you're hungover it'll be the biggest pain in the **** you'll ever have to get through.

And that's my story, and I'm sticking with it.
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Re: Re:

17 Feb 2017 05:28

Tricycle Rider wrote:
movingtarget wrote:
Tricycle Rider wrote:
Bustedknuckle wrote:
Best sci-fi movie ever..next, 'Day the Earth Stood Still'..
Can't remember if I've seen The Day the Earth Stood Still (age, memory, and having seen too many movies in the past are failing me), I might want to give it a whirl.

Have you seen Quintet with Paul Newman? One film critic's review totally cracked me up... he said Quintet was Altman's nadir. lol!

Still love the flick, though, think I'll rent it again.


Altman did make some dodgy movies. I thought Quintet was okay. McCabe and Mrs Miller didn't do much for me. I liked MASH and Come Back To The Five and Dime Jimmy Dean but I have never seen Nashville which most people regard as his best. From what I have read about Altman he was a vicious drunk and not a very nice person and also a bit of a skinflint. If you are interested in movies from the 60s and 70s i read a good book by Peter Biskind called Easy Riders Raging Bulls which covered all of the big directors from those years including Scorsese, Altman, Spielberg and many others. Entertaining read and very interesting.
Yeah, but, but... what did you think of Gosford Park? (Personally I loved it, it was so understated I thought it was actually lovely.)

Back to sci-fi, and now we have the biggie called 2001: A Space Odyssey

Personally, I think it depends on what you're on at the time while watching - smoke a joint it's cool, but if you're hungover it'll be the biggest pain in the **** you'll ever have to get through.

And that's my story, and I'm sticking with it.


Never saw Gosford Park but I liked 2001 especially the homicidal computer HAL and the star gate sequence ! Kubrick was another one who made great movies like Clockwork Orange or 2001 then he would make something like Eyes Wide Shut which pretty much sums up the viewing experience ! Paths of Glory was another great Kubrick movie. I thought the Shining was overrated though visually great same with Full Metal Jacket which was great in parts but a bit disappointing. Had nowhere near the impact of the Deer Hunter or Apocalypse Now.
movingtarget
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Re: Re:

18 Feb 2017 22:08

movingtarget wrote:ubrick was another one who made great movies like Clockwork Orange or 2001 then he would make something like Eyes Wide Shut which pretty much sums up the viewing experience! ...I thought the Shining was overrated though visually great same with Full Metal Jacket which was great in parts but a bit disappointing. Had nowhere near the impact of the Deer Hunter or Apocalypse Now.

Completely agree 100% with what you said there. The Deer Hunter and Apocalypse are very different movies, but both impacted me tremendously. FMJ is nowhere near that level. But it is almost two films in one. The first half of the recruits in bootcamp is Kubrick at his best, the second half of the film, not so much. Didn't like Eyes Wide Shut at all. Agree on The Shining, at times it's groundbreaking cinema, but quite uneven. 2001 was brilliant to me, though a bit mundane (on purpose, I know) at others.

I saw both M*A*S*H* and Nashville over 20 years ago now and remembered liking both quite a bit. Altman's characters, and splitting up of of the story worked perfect in those films. I thought The Player and Shortcuts were overpraised, and Images underrated, though it may seem dated today.
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Re: Re:

19 Feb 2017 01:30

Alpe d'Huez wrote:
movingtarget wrote:ubrick was another one who made great movies like Clockwork Orange or 2001 then he would make something like Eyes Wide Shut which pretty much sums up the viewing experience! ...I thought the Shining was overrated though visually great same with Full Metal Jacket which was great in parts but a bit disappointing. Had nowhere near the impact of the Deer Hunter or Apocalypse Now.

Completely agree 100% with what you said there. The Deer Hunter and Apocalypse are very different movies, but both impacted me tremendously. FMJ is nowhere near that level. But it is almost two films in one. The first half of the recruits in bootcamp is Kubrick at his best, the second half of the film, not so much. Didn't like Eyes Wide Shut at all. Agree on The Shining, at times it's groundbreaking cinema, but quite uneven. 2001 was brilliant to me, though a bit mundane (on purpose, I know) at others.

I saw both M*A*S*H* and Nashville over 20 years ago now and remembered liking both quite a bit. Altman's characters, and splitting up of of the story worked perfect in those films. I thought The Player and Shortcuts were overpraised, and Images underrated, though it may seem dated today.


I agree that the Player and Short cuts were okay but nothing I would bother with again. The first half of Full Metal Jacket was very good and Lee Ermey was amazing as the drill sergeant. No surprise that he used to be one ! The second half did not work very well I agree. Even Platoon I thought was over praised. I was surprised it cleaned up with awards and what not. To be honest I have never been much of an Oliver Stone fan but I thought Salvador, Natural Born Killers, U Turn and Born On the Fourth Of July were good. The rest of his films didn't impress me much.
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Re: Re:

19 Feb 2017 01:35

movingtarget wrote:Altman did make some dodgy movies. I thought Quintet was okay.
I just watched Quintet again, and am glad I was still able to find some old reviews I had read a while back. I think they're funny because they're mostly true. Here's one:

All great directors must be arrogant to the extent that they will follow their dreams through to the bitter, sometimes banal end. This time Mr. Altman's faith in himself has led him over the brink.

And here's another:

The narrative is convoluted, the characters thin, and the pace appropriately glacial; burdened with opaque metaphysical dialogue and bizarre, medieval-looking costumes.

I must apologize to Altman, btw., this movie wasn't his nadir, according to a film critic it was actually Paul Newman's. lol

Personally, I think it's just one of those movies you have to be in the mood for, and the thing I found the most confusing were the characters and their "medieval" wardrobe. They are so enveloped in heavy robes and costumes that all you can see is their faces, I get confused as to who is who. (The men especially look very alike - except for Newman and "St. Christopher" they're all older and fat. And except for Newman I think they all have beards. [I'm sure there's probably some significance to this, but I don't want to think about it too much.)

Still love the flick, though, I'm sure I'll rent it again at some point.
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Re: Movie Thread

19 Feb 2017 12:04

I remember already talking about Full Metal Jacket on this very thread with a poster I won't tell the name.

My opinion is also still that Part I was very impressive. It reminds me of Sidney Lumet's The Hill though the later is about WWII but also about abuse of power. Only there's a bit of nuance compared to anti-militarist Kubrick.

Yet my beef on Full Metal Jacket especially but also most US films of the "Cinema Vietnam" period (which oddly enough started after the war ended) is how they portrayed the Vietnamese population. In Full Metal Jacket, Vietnamese are prostitutes, pimps and serial killers. In The Deer Hunter they are cynical torturers. Even if they were supposed to be anti-war films, they were still "framing The Other". The GI's were turned into bullies while the Vietnamese had always been savages. You also have that pattern in Southern Comfort which fits into this wave of Vietnam War films but is about a national guard squad on a weekend manoeuvre in the Bayou swamps of Louisiana. Here instead of Vietnamese you have Cajuns. The GI's are arrogant and sure of themselves while the Cajuns are half savages and bullies, part of a hostile environment. You cannot see too much of the Cajuns' cheerfulness. At the end there's a Cajun song but at the same time they are portrayed slaughtering a pig in order to enhance the feeling that they are brutal.

French films about the Indochina wars such as Pierre Schoendoerffer's The 317th Platoon and Le Crabe-tambour (Drummer Crab) showed Asian characters with much more humanity and the French soldiers had much more respect of the Vietnamese population and its nature. The 317th Platoon had a huge influence on Platoon with regards to foley and on Apocalypse Now (Redux version) as Coppola picked Schoendoerffer the metaphor of the egg (A Cambodgian pressing an egg and saying "the White leaves, the Yellow stays").

The only US "Vietnam film" depicting Asians with humanity is Stone's Heaven and Earth but then again it's the story of a Vietnamese girl who eventually emigrated to the US, so that in the end, the US are always the winners while the reality is that they've brought a very rich agricultural country to pieces. It's lamentable.

Of course I've tried to watch some Vietnamese films about the war but the most famous of them were of course Vietminh propaganda which isn't much better. A more interesting one was Đất khổ, non-Communist South Vietnamese film but well I found it boring. :p But a good non-Communist Vietnamese film, that should exist, I guess.

Of all the US films, I would still save Apocalypse Now but you need to watch the redux version of it with the great French Rubber Plantation Scene (incl. the Egg metaphor mentioned above and the opinion of the Patriarch about Roosevelt creating Vietminnh against the Japs because he didn't want the French to stay in Indochina or the idea that Vietnamese Commies hate Chinese Commies). Also the Colonel Kurtz (Marlon Brando) monologue including T.S. Eliot's Hollow Men is amazing.

Air America was fun too.
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Re: Re:

19 Feb 2017 12:33

movingtarget wrote:
Tricycle Rider wrote:
movingtarget wrote:
Tricycle Rider wrote:
Bustedknuckle wrote:
Best sci-fi movie ever..next, 'Day the Earth Stood Still'..
Can't remember if I've seen The Day the Earth Stood Still (age, memory, and having seen too many movies in the past are failing me), I might want to give it a whirl.

Have you seen Quintet with Paul Newman? One film critic's review totally cracked me up... he said Quintet was Altman's nadir. lol!

Still love the flick, though, think I'll rent it again.


Altman did make some dodgy movies. I thought Quintet was okay. McCabe and Mrs Miller didn't do much for me. I liked MASH and Come Back To The Five and Dime Jimmy Dean but I have never seen Nashville which most people regard as his best. From what I have read about Altman he was a vicious drunk and not a very nice person and also a bit of a skinflint. If you are interested in movies from the 60s and 70s i read a good book by Peter Biskind called Easy Riders Raging Bulls which covered all of the big directors from those years including Scorsese, Altman, Spielberg and many others. Entertaining read and very interesting.
Yeah, but, but... what did you think of Gosford Park? (Personally I loved it, it was so understated I thought it was actually lovely.)

Back to sci-fi, and now we have the biggie called 2001: A Space Odyssey

Personally, I think it depends on what you're on at the time while watching - smoke a joint it's cool, but if you're hungover it'll be the biggest pain in the **** you'll ever have to get through.

And that's my story, and I'm sticking with it.


Never saw Gosford Park but I liked 2001 especially the homicidal computer HAL and the star gate sequence ! Kubrick was another one who made great movies like Clockwork Orange or 2001 then he would make something like Eyes Wide Shut which pretty much sums up the viewing experience ! Paths of Glory was another great Kubrick movie. I thought the Shining was overrated though visually great same with Full Metal Jacket which was great in parts but a bit disappointing. Had nowhere near the impact of the Deer Hunter or Apocalypse Now.


Had 'real' members of the military who saw VietNam laughing in the isles. Steeped in BS colloquialism, sayings, phrases only found in a moovie. Platoon far better but neither hold a candle to Apocalypse Now(First gen not
Re- Dux).

AirAmerica was fun and pretty dern accurate.
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Re: Movie Thread

19 Feb 2017 13:14

Echoes wrote:I remember already talking about Full Metal Jacket on this very thread with a poster I won't tell the name.

My opinion is also still that Part I was very impressive. It reminds me of Sidney Lumet's The Hill though the later is about WWII but also about abuse of power. Only there's a bit of nuance compared to anti-militarist Kubrick.

Yet my beef on Full Metal Jacket especially but also most US films of the "Cinema Vietnam" period (which oddly enough started after the war ended) is how they portrayed the Vietnamese population. In Full Metal Jacket, Vietnamese are prostitutes, pimps and serial killers. In The Deer Hunter they are cynical torturers. Even if they were supposed to be anti-war films, they were still "framing The Other". The GI's were turned into bullies while the Vietnamese had always been savages. You also have that pattern in Southern Comfort which fits into this wave of Vietnam War films but is about a national guard squad on a weekend manoeuvre in the Bayou swamps of Louisiana. Here instead of Vietnamese you have Cajuns. The GI's are arrogant and sure of themselves while the Cajuns are half savages and bullies, part of a hostile environment. You cannot see too much of the Cajuns' cheerfulness. At the end there's a Cajun song but at the same time they are portrayed slaughtering a pig in order to enhance the feeling that they are brutal.

French films about the Indochina wars such as Pierre Schoendoerffer's The 317th Platoon and Le Crabe-tambour (Drummer Crab) showed Asian characters with much more humanity and the French soldiers had much more respect of the Vietnamese population and its nature. The 317th Platoon had a huge influence on Platoon with regards to foley and on Apocalypse Now (Redux version) as Coppola picked Schoendoerffer the metaphor of the egg (A Cambodgian pressing an egg and saying "the White leaves, the Yellow stays").

The only US "Vietnam film" depicting Asians with humanity is Stone's Heaven and Earth but then again it's the story of a Vietnamese girl who eventually emigrated to the US, so that in the end, the US are always the winners while the reality is that they've brought a very rich agricultural country to pieces. It's lamentable.

Of course I've tried to watch some Vietnamese films about the war but the most famous of them were of course Vietminh propaganda which isn't much better. A more interesting one was Đất khổ, non-Communist South Vietnamese film but well I found it boring. :p But a good non-Communist Vietnamese film, that should exist, I guess.

Of all the US films, I would still save Apocalypse Now but you need to watch the redux version of it with the great French Rubber Plantation Scene (incl. the Egg metaphor mentioned above and the opinion of the Patriarch about Roosevelt creating Vietminnh against the Japs because he didn't want the French to stay in Indochina or the idea that Vietnamese Commies hate Chinese Commies). Also the Colonel Kurtz (Marlon Brando) monologue including T.S. Eliot's Hollow Men is amazing.

Air America was fun too.


i preferred the original version of Apocalypse Now. The director's cut seemed to upset the rhythm of the movie. the plantation scene and the Brando scene were good but the Playboy bunny scene added nothing of value at all. I think the shorter version worked better. On the big screen the film had such an impact especially the battle scenes. I find that most director's cuts are pointless, this wasn't the worst one I have seen. I remember seeing a movie years ago called The Lost Command about French Indochina and the French in Algeria. I thought that was pretty good. Made in the sixties.
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Re: Re:

19 Feb 2017 13:20

Had 'real' members of the military who saw VietNam laughing in the isles. Steeped in BS colloquialism, sayings, phrases only found in a moovie. Platoon far better but neither hold a candle to Apocalypse Now(First gen not
Re- Dux).

AirAmerica was fun and pretty dern accurate.[/quote]

No doubt that Coppola made some great movies. Apocalypse Now, the Conversation and the first two Godfather movies. The rest I thought were hit and miss like his version of Dracula which had some great moments and also some not so great moments. Don't think I saw all of Air America for some reason or maybe I just forgot.
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Re: Re:

19 Feb 2017 16:23

Bustedknuckle wrote:
Had 'real' members of the military who saw VietNam laughing in the isles. Steeped in BS colloquialism, sayings, phrases only found in a moovie. Platoon far better but neither hold a candle to Apocalypse Now(First gen not
Re- Dux).

AirAmerica was fun and pretty dern accurate.
I remember back in the mid 80s a whole bunch of Vietnam war movies had come out after the success of Platoon, the ones I recall seeing are: Full Metal Jacket, Hamburger Hill, Born on the Fourth of July, Good Morning Vietnam, and Casualties of War.

The one that had made the biggest impression on me was Platoon (was a young and bright-eyed teen back then), the other ones not so much. Well, except for Born on the Fourth of July, while not a Tom Cruise fan I think he did a pretty good job in it.

There's no comparing these to Apocalypse Now and The Deer Hunter, of course, I find these two very difficult and uncomfortable to (re)watch. So I don't.
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Re: Re:

19 Feb 2017 20:33

Tricycle Rider wrote:
Bustedknuckle wrote:
Had 'real' members of the military who saw VietNam laughing in the isles. Steeped in BS colloquialism, sayings, phrases only found in a moovie. Platoon far better but neither hold a candle to Apocalypse Now(First gen not
Re- Dux).

AirAmerica was fun and pretty dern accurate.
I remember back in the mid 80s a whole bunch of Vietnam war movies had come out after the success of Platoon, the ones I recall seeing are: Full Metal Jacket, Hamburger Hill, Born on the Fourth of July, Good Morning Vietnam, and Casualties of War.

The one that had made the biggest impression on me was Platoon (was a young and bright-eyed teen back then), the other ones not so much. Well, except for Born on the Fourth of July, while not a Tom Cruise fan I think he did a pretty good job in it.

There's no comparing these to Apocalypse Now and The Deer Hunter, of course, I find these two very difficult and uncomfortable to (re)watch. So I don't.


Casualties of War I think was underrated. Sean Penn and Michael J Fox were very good.
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Re: Re:

20 Feb 2017 02:24

movingtarget wrote:
Tricycle Rider wrote:
Bustedknuckle wrote:
Had 'real' members of the military who saw VietNam laughing in the isles. Steeped in BS colloquialism, sayings, phrases only found in a moovie. Platoon far better but neither hold a candle to Apocalypse Now(First gen not
Re- Dux).

AirAmerica was fun and pretty dern accurate.
I remember back in the mid 80s a whole bunch of Vietnam war movies had come out after the success of Platoon, the ones I recall seeing are: Full Metal Jacket, Hamburger Hill, Born on the Fourth of July, Good Morning Vietnam, and Casualties of War.

The one that had made the biggest impression on me was Platoon (was a young and bright-eyed teen back then), the other ones not so much. Well, except for Born on the Fourth of July, while not a Tom Cruise fan I think he did a pretty good job in it.

There's no comparing these to Apocalypse Now and The Deer Hunter, of course, I find these two very difficult and uncomfortable to (re)watch. So I don't.


Casualties of War I think was underrated. Sean Penn and Michael J Fox were very good.


Well, Sean Penn was. Fox proved he was a lightweight who should have stuck with Disney quality comedies.
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Re: Re:

21 Feb 2017 13:46

Tricycle Rider wrote:
Bustedknuckle wrote:
Had 'real' members of the military who saw VietNam laughing in the isles. Steeped in BS colloquialism, sayings, phrases only found in a moovie. Platoon far better but neither hold a candle to Apocalypse Now(First gen not
Re- Dux).

AirAmerica was fun and pretty dern accurate.
I remember back in the mid 80s a whole bunch of Vietnam war movies had come out after the success of Platoon, the ones I recall seeing are: Full Metal Jacket, Hamburger Hill, Born on the Fourth of July, Good Morning Vietnam, and Casualties of War.

The one that had made the biggest impression on me was Platoon (was a young and bright-eyed teen back then), the other ones not so much. Well, except for Born on the Fourth of July, while not a Tom Cruise fan I think he did a pretty good job in it.

There's no comparing these to Apocalypse Now and The Deer Hunter, of course, I find these two very difficult and uncomfortable to (re)watch. So I don't.


I watch Apocalypse Now often, along with BladeRunner.

Sequel of BladeRunner..hope they don't good it up.

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt1856101/videoplayer/vi1446098457?ref_=tt_ov_vi
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Re: Re:

21 Feb 2017 15:11

Bustedknuckle wrote:

Sequel of BladeRunner..hope they don't good it up.

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt1856101/videoplayer/vi1446098457?ref_=tt_ov_vi
First reaction is oh no, this is gonna go all kinds of wrong. (Like the sequel, or remake, or prequel to Tron, or whatever that travesty was. [Like Tron, btw., despite its cheesy special effects.])

I dunno, I'm curious, but I have my doubts. (Won't be spending money on it at the theater, I'll just wait till it comes out on DVD or streaming.)

--

On a different note- I watched Zoolander 2 yesterday, I'd like to say it was just pure, dumb fun. But except for some pop culture references from yesteryear it was just pure dumb.
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21 Feb 2017 16:56

I too am worried about Blade Runner 2049. I am with Sean Young, they could have left well enough alone. However, it looks like they are trying to make it in the same universe, but fairly different in the story. Ridley Scott tried this with Prometheus (he directed that, but isn't BR 2049, that's falling on Denis Villneuve, who directed Arrival and Sicario), to me Prometheus was indeed different, but a mess. I fear a similar fate for BR. One positive sign is that Hampten Fancher, who wrote the first several drafts of the first BR (co-writer David Peoples said it was a perfect script when he was asked to re-write it) is also writing this, and this script received equally high praise from all who read it. I have read some of Fancher's writing, and he definitely has a very visual style of writing, akin to someone like Ray Bradbury or Richard Matheson or the Twilight Zone writers (Serling, Beaumont).
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Re:

21 Feb 2017 21:55

Alpe d'Huez wrote:I too am worried about Blade Runner 2049. I am with Sean Young, they could have left well enough alone. However, it looks like they are trying to make it in the same universe, but fairly different in the story. Ridley Scott tried this with Prometheus (he directed that, but isn't BR 2049, that's falling on Denis Villneuve, who directed Arrival and Sicario), to me Prometheus was indeed different, but a mess. I fear a similar fate for BR. One positive sign is that Hampten Fancher, who wrote the first several drafts of the first BR (co-writer David Peoples said it was a perfect script when he was asked to re-write it) is also writing this, and this script received equally high praise from all who read it. I have read some of Fancher's writing, and he definitely has a very visual style of writing, akin to someone like Ray Bradbury or Richard Matheson or the Twilight Zone writers (Serling, Beaumont).


Well what to say about Prometheus ? Terribly disappointing. some stunning visuals but some of the acting was appalling. It was kinda like a dumbed down version of Alien without the suspense and atmosphere. One great set piece when the female scientist had to operate on herself to remove the alien, and the opening was good but it went downhill fast. God knows what they will do with Blade Runner but I was disappointed to hear that Ridley Scott wasn't doing the sequel. The original was a classic as was the original Alien. People that have only seen films like Blade Runner, Apocalypse Now and Alien on a TV screen don't know what they are missing !
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21 Feb 2017 23:02

One Vietnam film not mentioned so far that was different than the others, but came out at the same time, and in high praise, is Coming Home. That film has a definite anti-war statement, with Jane Fonda attached, but is really noteworthy for it's realism of average every day people coping with the difficulties of returning from war, which was rarely even mentioned at that time. Terrific, Oscar winning performance by Jon Voight.

If 1978 had both The Deer Hunter and Coming Home, one film not mentioned from that year was Go Tell the Spartans. Done on a smaller budget, with Burt Lacaster, it showed a glimpse into how awful the Vietnam war was.

Agree with most else what Echoes said.

Also agree Casualties of War was quite underrated. It still looks like a DePalma film, it just never seemed like something he would do, and missed the timing I think. Upon release, Vietnam movies were really out of favor. Fox does an okay job, his nerves make you uncomfortable, but I agree Penn is excellent in it. Having seen him in several things before that (and since) it's like you knew he had it in him to be a bully and a jerk in the right role, but never to the degree that he pulled it off.
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Re: Re:

21 Feb 2017 23:53

movingtarget wrote: People that have only seen films like Blade Runner, Apocalypse Now and Alien on a TV screen don't know what they are missing !
What's wrong with watching these movies on your own TV? (By that I mean DVD or streaming, not the crap you get when you're watching TNT, or other TV channels where you get commercials every 15 minutes.)

Personally, I don't like other people's noise, or their big hair/hats getting in my view, or the surround system just being so damn loud to where you can't understand the dialogue. (I'm rather particular about the dialogue, which I may have mentioned earlier.)

So, I don't like theaters, I prefer watching movies in my own space. Your mileage may vary, of course. And that's okay by me.

EDIT- Also hate people kicking the back of my chair while they're getting all comfy in their chairs - this has got to be the biggest of my pet peeves going to an actual theater.
User avatar Tricycle Rider
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