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Movie Thread

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01 Nov 2017 15:06

I'm surprised no one has mentioned Blade Runner 2049. I saw it in IMAX and the visuals were extraordinary. I wish they had turned the volume down as, maybe because I don't usually pay the extra to see movies in IMAX, the sound system was overwhelming intially, as if I was being assaulted! For the casual movie goer the length of the movie may be too much for some (approx. 2 & 1/2 hours plus) but for serious sci-fi fan like myself it was heaven. It is a true compliment to the original.
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Re:

02 Nov 2017 12:32

Angliru wrote:I'm surprised no one has mentioned Blade Runner 2049. I saw it in IMAX and the visuals were extraordinary. I wish they had turned the volume down as, maybe because I don't usually pay the extra to see movies in IMAX, the sound system was overwhelming intially, as if I was being assaulted! For the casual movie goer the length of the movie may be too much for some (approx. 2 & 1/2 hours plus) but for serious sci-fi fan like myself it was heaven. It is a true compliment to the original.
I'm a fan of sci-fi as well, but I'll wait till the Blade Runner sequel comes out on free streaming, just because I have some hesitations about it. (Don't mind long movies, btw., but prefer to watch them at home in my own bed. That way if I get bored I can fall asleep comfortably.)

In the meantime I've recently re-watched Ordinary People (1980), Philadelphia (1993), Coming to America (1988), and just yesterday Girl, Interrupted (1993). I think they all have something to offer, the ending of Girl, Interrupted, however, I thought was a little too happy. Plus, I've never cared for Winona Ryder much, why they had her practically whispering while talking to someone through a door (and that person actually hearing her and talking back) is beyond me. I'll have to blame that on the directing, though.

Next up, while Amazon prime still streams it for free, I'll be re-watching The Right Stuff (1983), the first time I saw it long ago I was blown away by it. Will have to see how well it holds up.
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Re: Movie Thread

02 Nov 2017 13:09

Sci-fi is usually crap. I'd just save some interesting dystopian sci-fi films such as Brazil for instance, otherwise it's just like Alec Guinness said: "a fantasy world of childish banalities", intended to make the viewer dream and disconnect from the miserable reality around us.

The traditional European cinema until the late seventies was meant to show that reality, especially the Italian post-war (neo-realistic) cinema: "Down and Dirty" (1976) by Ettore Scola being a typical example. Italian cinema was the embodiment of a social conscience. All this was washed away in the late seventies by the first Star Wars films. The middle-class viewers no longer gave any damn about it, no more moral duties. They'd be living in their own fantasy world...

If I remember well, Alex de la Iglesia's "800 balas" (2002) argued that the advent sci-fi films killed Spaghetti Westerns (also a very social realistic genre about the Mexican revolution, about social justice and care for the poor). I wouldn't really agree though because Spaghetti Westerns was already dying but other genres such as the poliziotteschi or gialli, definitely.
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Re: Movie Thread

02 Nov 2017 17:17

Echoes wrote:Sci-fi is usually crap. I'd just save some interesting dystopian sci-fi films such as Brazil for instance, otherwise it's just like Alec Guinness said: "a fantasy world of childish banalities", intended to make the viewer dream and disconnect from the miserable reality around us.

I suppose it depends on what you're looking for in movies, Echoes. I would guess most people want a break from reality, I don't see anything wrong with that.

How do you feel about sci-fi classics such as THX-1138, Logan's Run, and Quintet? (I can understand if you don't like Quintet, nobody besides me likes it either. :lol: )
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02 Nov 2017 19:08

As with all movie genres, the majority is crap. That applies to any effort in most art forms. There is exceptional work, a small percentage of the whole, and there is the rest. Just off the top of my head I can name several, IMO, quality sci-fi movies that have been released in recent years. Now I'm not a Star Wars, Star Trek fan (Yes to the original tv show/No to recent adaptations: tv & cinematic).

Some quality sci-fi (or my idea of it) I've seen recently: Blade Runner 2049; Ex Machina; Interstellar; Inception; Prometheus to a lesser degree but with Ridley Scott the bar is pretty high compared to most other directors in the genre.
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Re:

02 Nov 2017 21:37

Angliru wrote:As with all movie genres, the majority is crap. There is exceptional work, a small percentage of the whole, and there is the rest. Just off the top of my head I can name several, IMO, quality sci-fi movies that have been released in recent years. Now I'm not a Star Wars, Star Trek fan (Yes to the original tv show/No to recent adaptations: tv & cinematic).

Some quality sci-fi (or my idea of it) I've seen recently: Blade Runner 2049; Ex Machina; Interstellar; Inception; Prometheus to a lesser degree but with Ridley Scott the bar is pretty high compared to most other directors in the genre.
Can't disagree with that. But once in a while you thankfully find a gem in that huge heap of dung that the movie industry keeps on cranking out.

I'll have to check if Amazon prime has any of the newer sci-fi movies you had mentioned for free, I just hate paying for stuff I'm not sure I'll enjoy. And on that note...

The Right Stuff (1983) - yes, it really is slightly over three hours long. And in those three hours there are plenty of cheesy Hollywood moments, but there are also some truly suspenseful and dramatic moments. So it all kind of balances out, I think the flick has held up pretty well after all these years. Would definitely recommend it to a younger audience who isn't as jaded, critical, and picky as me.
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Re: Re:

03 Nov 2017 05:14

Tricycle Rider wrote:
Angliru wrote:As with all movie genres, the majority is crap. There is exceptional work, a small percentage of the whole, and there is the rest. Just off the top of my head I can name several, IMO, quality sci-fi movies that have been released in recent years. Now I'm not a Star Wars, Star Trek fan (Yes to the original tv show/No to recent adaptations: tv & cinematic).

Some quality sci-fi (or my idea of it) I've seen recently: Blade Runner 2049; Ex Machina; Interstellar; Inception; Prometheus to a lesser degree but with Ridley Scott the bar is pretty high compared to most other directors in the genre.
Can't disagree with that. But once in a while you thankfully find a gem in that huge heap of dung that the movie industry keeps on cranking out.

I'll have to check if Amazon prime has any of the newer sci-fi movies you had mentioned for free, I just hate paying for stuff I'm not sure I'll enjoy. And on that note...

The Right Stuff (1983) - yes, it really is slightly over three hours long. And in those three hours there are plenty of cheesy Hollywood moments, but there are also some truly suspenseful and dramatic moments. So it all kind of balances out, I think the flick has held up pretty well after all these years. Would definitely recommend it to a younger audience who isn't as jaded, critical, and picky as me.


I thought it was very good and the book was even better. Kaufman's best movie. Also a great cast.
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Re: Movie Thread

03 Nov 2017 12:07

Echoes wrote:Sci-fi is usually crap. I'd just save some interesting dystopian sci-fi films such as Brazil for instance, otherwise it's just like Alec Guinness said: "a fantasy world of childish banalities", intended to make the viewer dream and disconnect from the miserable reality around us.


Movies that happen in an unrealistic world on a surface level can still be used to develop certain worthwhile themes. You can have interesting personae and character development or you can use a really unrealistic sci-fi or fantasy setting to develop certain philosophical themes. Regardless of what you think of the ideas being explored in Bladerunner, Bladerunner definitely goes beyond the mediocre flashy sci-fi which is indeed just "a fantasy world of childish banalities" and explores philosophical questions of what it means to be a human, through its dystopian setting with highly advanced AI and very human-like androids. Of course, dealing with ideas of transhumanism and using super advanced AI and robots to question what it means to be a human has since become a terrible cliché used in all sorts of mediocre sci-fi movies. But regardless of what you think of the ideas itself, Bladerunner definitely deserves some credit for introducing the viewers to some serious philosophical questions through its sci-fi setting.
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Re: Movie Thread

03 Nov 2017 23:57

Maaaaaaaarten wrote:
Echoes wrote:Sci-fi is usually crap. I'd just save some interesting dystopian sci-fi films such as Brazil for instance, otherwise it's just like Alec Guinness said: "a fantasy world of childish banalities", intended to make the viewer dream and disconnect from the miserable reality around us.


Movies that happen in an unrealistic world on a surface level can still be used to develop certain worthwhile themes. You can have interesting personae and character development or you can use a really unrealistic sci-fi or fantasy setting to develop certain philosophical themes. Regardless of what you think of the ideas being explored in Bladerunner, Bladerunner definitely goes beyond the mediocre flashy sci-fi which is indeed just "a fantasy world of childish banalities" and explores philosophical questions of what it means to be a human, through its dystopian setting with highly advanced AI and very human-like androids. Of course, dealing with ideas of transhumanism and using super advanced AI and robots to question what it means to be a human has since become a terrible cliché used in all sorts of mediocre sci-fi movies. But regardless of what you think of the ideas itself, Bladerunner definitely deserves some credit for introducing the viewers to some serious philosophical questions through its sci-fi setting.


I agree. Blade Runner was one of the best in that genre in recent times. It's not as if the fantasy genre and mainstream movies don't have a lot rubbish either.
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Re: Movie Thread

04 Nov 2017 18:43

Ah yeah as I suggested in my post dystopian films or books are the most interesting science-fiction stories. Just an anecdote about it. Jules Verne is known for his anticipation novels in the nineteenth century, which sold very well, now the best sold French author worldwide but those novels are really utopian and optimistic about technological progress as you all know but of course this was an era for that. He however wrote one dystopian book: Paris in the Twentieth Century. Paris in the Twentieth Century never got published in his lifetime because nobody would believe in his prophecies, said his publisher and so it only got published in 1994, 131 years after being written.

This being said, I haven't seen "Blade Runner". Alec Guinness referred to Star Wars when he said "fantasy world of childish banalities". Star Wars is by no means dystopian. I've forced myself to watch the first episode so that I can make a judgment but it really is about new technology and political centralisation.

However it still begs the question why making science-fiction films in order to reflect upon human personalities and social realities while it requires such a huge budget and it's so "easy" to make a simple film set in the real world that could be equally as good (not to say much better)? The best films I've seen are usually low-budget films. :)
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05 Nov 2017 00:03

I just saw "Gone Girl" last night. It was intriguing, and I like the plot/concept. The ending wasn't great though. If they intended to have a sequel the ending makes sense, but its still weak. Plus, if they intended to have a sequel they are probably past their 'best by date'.
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Re:

05 Nov 2017 00:45

jmdirt wrote:I just saw "Gone Girl" last night. It was intriguing, and I like the plot/concept. The ending wasn't great though. If they intended to have a sequel the ending makes sense, but its still weak. Plus, if they intended to have a sequel they are probably past their 'best by date'.


I didn't care for it. I found the last third of it unconvincing. Surprisingly Affleck's was the best performance in it.
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Re:

09 Nov 2017 21:49

Scott SoCal wrote:The Godfather. Hands down.


Yes, my all time favorite. i also love Seven and Shawshank Redemption
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Re: Movie Thread

10 Nov 2017 16:47

Echoes wrote:Ah yeah as I suggested in my post dystopian films or books are the most interesting science-fiction stories. Just an anecdote about it. Jules Verne is known for his anticipation novels in the nineteenth century, which sold very well, now the best sold French author worldwide but those novels are really utopian and optimistic about technological progress as you all know but of course this was an era for that. He however wrote one dystopian book: Paris in the Twentieth Century. Paris in the Twentieth Century never got published in his lifetime because nobody would believe in his prophecies, said his publisher and so it only got published in 1994, 131 years after being written.

This being said, I haven't seen "Blade Runner". Alec Guinness referred to Star Wars when he said "fantasy world of childish banalities". Star Wars is by no means dystopian. I've forced myself to watch the first episode so that I can make a judgment but it really is about new technology and political centralisation.

However it still begs the question why making science-fiction films in order to reflect upon human personalities and social realities while it requires such a huge budget and it's so "easy" to make a simple film set in the real world that could be equally as good (not to say much better)? The best films I've seen are usually low-budget films. :)


I can think of some relatively small films with sci-fi leanings that aren't astronomically budgeted but are quality cinema. Gattaca is one that definitly comes to mind.
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Re: Re:

03 Dec 2017 00:27

pauljam wrote:
Scott SoCal wrote:The Godfather. Hands down.


Yes, my all time favorite. i also love Seven and Shawshank Redemption


The Shawshank Redemption performances by Tim Robbins and Morgan Freeman are their career best. Not often a movie improves on the book but that one did. Seven is still David Fincher's best movie.
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19 Jan 2018 05:21

I've just recently seen The Pervert's Guide To Cinema and The Pervert's Guide to Ideology, and I highly recommend both documentaries. The former especially for the cinephiles here, but then again I already liked Žižek.

As for sci-fi movies, I too really like Blade Runner, and I think 2049 was overall quite good as well. And while it's not a typical sci-fi movie, I've seen The Fountain described as such, and it certainly has sci-fi elements to it (perhaps depending on your interpretation).
Goodbye, Tommeke; thank you for all you have given us!
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Re:

24 Jan 2018 13:23

Angliru wrote:I'm surprised no one has mentioned Blade Runner 2049. I saw it in IMAX and the visuals were extraordinary. I wish they had turned the volume down as, maybe because I don't usually pay the extra to see movies in IMAX, the sound system was overwhelming intially, as if I was being assaulted! For the casual movie goer the length of the movie may be too much for some (approx. 2 & 1/2 hours plus) but for serious sci-fi fan like myself it was heaven. It is a true compliment to the original.


Not surprising that it has been nominated for Academy Awards for Visuals, Production Design and Sound. Dunkirk is a film that has split opinions. I neither loved or hated it but I found it interesting and visually superb. It has also been nominated for many awards.
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24 Jan 2018 15:15

Netserk wrote:I've just recently seen The Pervert's Guide To Cinema and The Pervert's Guide to Ideology, and I highly recommend both documentaries. The former especially for the cinephiles here, but then again I already liked Žižek.

As for sci-fi movies, I too really like Blade Runner, and I think 2049 was overall quite good as well. And while it's not a typical sci-fi movie, I've seen The Fountain described as such, and it certainly has sci-fi elements to it (perhaps depending on your interpretation).


I'm a fan of The Fountain also. It's like a metaphysical fever dream... that is the best way I can describe it. Being an admirer of Rachel Weisz, I tend to make a point of seeing anything that she's in because she rarely disappoints. I really appreciate Aronofsky's distinctive vision. There is an undercurrent of intensity in a lot of his movies that seems to keep you riveted to the screen.
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Re: Re:

24 Jan 2018 22:07

Angliru wrote:
Netserk wrote:I've just recently seen The Pervert's Guide To Cinema and The Pervert's Guide to Ideology, and I highly recommend both documentaries. The former especially for the cinephiles here, but then again I already liked Žižek.

As for sci-fi movies, I too really like Blade Runner, and I think 2049 was overall quite good as well. And while it's not a typical sci-fi movie, I've seen The Fountain described as such, and it certainly has sci-fi elements to it (perhaps depending on your interpretation).


I'm a fan of The Fountain also. It's like a metaphysical fever dream... that is the best way I can describe it. Being an admirer of Rachel Weisz, I tend to make a point of seeing anything that she's in because she rarely disappoints. I really appreciate Aronofsky's distinctive vision. There is an undercurrent of intensity in a lot of his movies that seems to keep you riveted to the screen.


I haven't seen The Fountain yet but I really liked Black Swan and Requiem For a Dream. Rachel Weisz is good in the right role. Sometimes though I think she gets miscast.
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24 Jan 2018 23:19

Moonlight (2016) - Hmmmm, a bit torn on this one.

The first and second part made sense to me, but the third one - if that man was my former friend I would be a bit worried about his mental capabilities. I get that the third part is supposed to be slow, but nonetheless...
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