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Oscar Pistorius

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11 Sep 2014 07:54

Bosco10 wrote:Well.. finally!... a verdict will be delivered by judge Masipa on Thursday. It will be a lengthy process that may last two days. She will review the entire case, and give reasons for her decisions. The South African judicial system is quite different from the US system, for sure!


Apparently she has to read out her verdict (which includes a review of the facts) which could amount to 100 pages!
TheSpud
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11 Sep 2014 08:13

He's getting a boatload.

Come on Thokozile!!
victorschipolrijk
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11 Sep 2014 10:41

Not guilty of either pre-meditated murder or murder so far. Still a possibility of a lesser verdict though.
I'll tell you something about cycling. We're a bunch of women. Gossipy women.?
User avatar LittleJo
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11 Sep 2014 12:19

Reading the early returns, he may actually skate (bounce?!) from all this. Crazy.
User avatar Alpe d'Huez
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11 Sep 2014 12:30

Alpe d'Huez wrote:Reading the early returns, he may actually skate (bounce?!) from all this. Crazy.


No shyte, even culpable homicide would be a joke.

This judge cain't even read her own report.

I only agree, that he is not guilty of premeditated murder.

But he is guilty of murder, not manslaughter.

If this is the best judge they can get, their system is in deep shyte.
victorschipolrijk
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11 Sep 2014 13:10

This judge is either senile, or has been paid off by the wealthy Pistorius family, or both.

And did I hear it wrong?: She said Oscar didn't intend to kill when he shot 4 black talons into that small toilet enclosure! holy moly..

All that's left for a guilty verdict is culpable homicide, and even if guilty, I bet she gives him a few months of house arrest along with making a couple of inspirational speeches for community service. bArF
Bosco10
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11 Sep 2014 13:13

Bosco10 wrote:This judge is either senile, or has been paid off by the wealthy Pistorius family, or both.

And did I hear it wrong?: She said Oscar didn't intend to kill when he shot 4 black talons into that small toilet enclosure! holy moly..

All that's left for a guilty verdict is culpable homicide, and even if guilty, I bet she gives him a few months of house arrest along with giving a couple of inspirational speeches for community service. bArF

Rio 2016 here we come. Has he written an autobiography yet?
"Doping doesn’t just even the playing field. It throws everyone’s chip back into a bag and you pull out a new one. Sometimes it makes you a god, other times, you hardly get much better." - Steve Tilford
kingjr
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11 Sep 2014 13:18

Bosco10 wrote:This judge is either senile, or has been paid off by the wealthy Pistorius family, or both.

And did I hear it wrong?: She said Oscar didn't intend to kill when he shot 4 black talons into that small toilet enclosure! holy moly..



The stuff I've read on Twitter (obviously a great source of information :rolleyes:) suggests that she only applied the murder charge to Reeva i.e. she's saying he didn't intend to kill Reeva, rather than he didn't intend to kill anyone. I would have thought that someone who was used to shooting a gun would have some idea that four bullets would kill someone.
I'll tell you something about cycling. We're a bunch of women. Gossipy women.?
User avatar LittleJo
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11 Sep 2014 13:28

cant believe he is going to walk from this.
MC: I don’t think Chris fully understood that (Vinokourov) had doped.

CF: No, I knew.

MC: Not fully.
User avatar the sceptic
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11 Sep 2014 14:00

What is the punishment for culpable homicide in SA (if found guilty)? Very odd for the judge the adjourn when they did...
thrawn
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11 Sep 2014 14:02

Justice prevails. I did not follow every audition, but the accusation was not strong let alone convincing. Well done.
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11 Sep 2014 14:09

Went back and read all the "experts" in this thread previous to the verdict. Sometimes people come off looking like they know a helluva lot more than what they really do.

Then the folks chiming in with HE IS GUILTY and will go AWAY. Without being their or knowing all the facts. Just hilarious.

I don't have an opinion on the SA system of justice. All I know is it is easy for people to second guess and back seat drive on all of this.

Some people on this tread "read" like idiots for posting such crap.
Put Some Respek Up On It
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11 Sep 2014 14:22

heart_attack_man wrote:That's not a bet I'm going to take - he's untouchable. He'll end up just like one of my favourite breakfast drinks, make no mistake about it.


Good post, heart_attack_man...

Anyone who actually thought justice would be served was deluding themselves.
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11 Sep 2014 14:40

thrawn wrote:What is the punishment for culpable homicide in SA (if found guilty)? Very odd for the judge the adjourn when they did...


I think he will be found guilty of culpable homicide. The sentence is apparently at the judge's discretion, and can range between community service and a lengthy jail term. He is also likely to be found guilty on the various gun charges, all of which can attract prison sentences.
#FeeltheBern
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11 Sep 2014 15:17

victorschipolrijk wrote:I only agree, that he is not guilty of premeditated murder. But he is guilty of murder, not manslaughter.

I didn't follow it all very closely, but that's what I thought, assumed.

With the charges that are left to hand out, I would have to think he'd be guilty of most of them. But with how things are going so far, who knows?

the sceptic wrote:cant believe he is going to hop from this.

FIFY. ;)
User avatar Alpe d'Huez
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11 Sep 2014 15:56

BigMac wrote:Justice prevails. I did not follow every audition, but the accusation was not strong let alone convincing. Well done.


rich white man walks away from charges. great justice.
MC: I don’t think Chris fully understood that (Vinokourov) had doped.

CF: No, I knew.

MC: Not fully.
User avatar the sceptic
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11 Sep 2014 16:18

the sceptic wrote:rich white man walks away from charges. great justice.


Well, either you're guilty or not, I trust justice in this case. The prosecuting attorney's arguments and narrative always looked too synthetic to me. He always seemed to be looking for something else other than truth, taking too much time denigrating Pistorius and screaming ''He did it, Your Honor'', ''He did it!'', and taking little time to explain it. No wonder the judge did not buy it or thought the evidence was noth enough. I don't think the fact that he is rich played a role here. His case seemed solid to me. Again, this from the audiences I've watched.
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11 Sep 2014 16:34

his defence was pathetic and its obvious that he murdered his girlfriend. Just because this joke of a trial has let him off doesnt mean he isnt guilty.
MC: I don’t think Chris fully understood that (Vinokourov) had doped.

CF: No, I knew.

MC: Not fully.
User avatar the sceptic
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11 Sep 2014 17:23

I accept the judge’s conclusions about the strength of the key evidence. But the fact remains that to believe this wasn’t murder you have to accept an overwhelmingly unlikely version of what happened:

1) that either Steenkamp went to the bathroom during a short interval when OP was out of bed, and he didn't hear her until she actually got there and closed the door - or that he got out of bed without noticing she wasn’t in it;

2) that when OP heard someone in the bathroom, he didn’t check to see if Steenkamp was still in bed, even though the gun that he fetched was right by or under the bed, and in fact he had to pass right by the bed to reach the bathroom, anyway;

3) that after calling out a warning to her he didn’t wait a few seconds for her to reply;

4) that he believed a burglar would lock himself in the bathroom;

5) that he regarded a burglar locked in the bathroom as an immediate threat to his safety;

and much more.

OP’s story was always possible in the sense that there was no hard evidence definitely refuting it. The question is whether anyone would actually behave in that manner. Who in his right mind would pass right by his bed to investigate the source of a noise without first confirming that his partner was in the bed? If Pistorius was so fearful that someone locked in a bathroom would shoot him before he could shoot the intruder, why did he come right up next to the bathroom door, and shout something to announce his position?

There are many, many things about his version that don’t make any sense at all. But you can always conclude, as the judge did, that OP was a really rare individual who does things differently. I’ll bet if you really wanted to, you could prove that the probability that he would act in that manner was less than the probability that hard evidence proved guilt in many cases in which it was assumed it did.

But there is no question that he acted negligently in a sense that, according to my understanding of SA law, is a pretty serious matter. And this judge does have a record of being pretty harsh on offenders whose guilt she was certain of. So I would not be surprised if she gives him a lengthy jail sentence.
User avatar Merckx index
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11 Sep 2014 19:14

Merckx index wrote:I accept the judge’s conclusions about the strength of the key evidence. But the fact remains that to believe this wasn’t murder you have to accept an overwhelmingly unlikely version of what happened:

1) that either Steenkamp went to the bathroom during a short interval when OP was out of bed, and he didn't hear her until she actually got there and closed the door - or that he got out of bed without noticing she wasn’t in it;

2) that when OP heard someone in the bathroom, he didn’t check to see if Steenkamp was still in bed, even though the gun that he fetched was right by or under the bed, and in fact he had to pass right by the bed to reach the bathroom, anyway;

3) that after calling out a warning to her he didn’t wait a few seconds for her to reply;

4) that he believed a burglar would lock himself in the bathroom;

5) that he regarded a burglar locked in the bathroom as an immediate threat to his safety;

and much more.

OP’s story was always possible in the sense that there was no hard evidence definitely refuting it. The question is whether anyone would actually behave in that manner. Who in his right mind would pass right by his bed to investigate the source of a noise without first confirming that his partner was in the bed? If Pistorius was so fearful that someone locked in a bathroom would shoot him before he could shoot the intruder, why did he come right up next to the bathroom door, and shout something to announce his position?

There are many, many things about his version that don’t make any sense at all. But you can always conclude, as the judge did, that OP was a really rare individual who does things differently. I’ll bet if you really wanted to, you could prove that the probability that he would act in that manner was less than the probability that hard evidence proved guilt in many cases in which it was assumed it did.

But there is no question that he acted negligently in a sense that, according to my understanding of SA law, is a pretty serious matter. And this judge does have a record of being pretty harsh on offenders whose guilt she was certain of. So I would not be surprised if she gives him a lengthy jail sentence.

very good post.I followed this interesting case for a long time, quite shocked about it now,looked like he will be found guilty.
Alberto Contador fanboy
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