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23 Sep 2017 16:54

Are the Rs burning their own empire with their healthcare scramble? The medical, pharma, and insurance kingdoms are built on more people paying more money so if one of their bills goes through, there will be less gold going to the machine.
jmdirt
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23 Sep 2017 19:09

We fight we win.

Semper Fi.

Stay Frosty
https://www.marines.com/story-detail-pages/battle-up.html
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Re: U.S. Politics

23 Sep 2017 19:22

blutto wrote:
The Sci-Fi Roots of the Far Right—From ‘Lucifer’s Hammer’ to Newt’s Moon Base to Donald’s Wall
Pournelle, Gingrich and Trump see a future that must be secured by authoritarian institutions that group together humanity’s best and prevent the rest from stifling them.

David Auerbach
DAVID AUERBACH
09.17.17 1:00 AM ET
There is a tendency to see President Donald Trump as a radical break from the past.
But conservative techno-futurist Newt Gingrich sees Trump as ushering in a revolution — with a subsequent utopian space-age.Gingrich has envisioned such a breakthrough, and hopes Trump will be an agent of it, for decades. Gingrich’s vision is one stop on a straight line that goes through his friend and legendary science-fiction novelist Jerry Pournelle’s Lucifer’s Hammer to Ronald Reagan’s Star Wars to Bill Clinton’s impeachment to Trump.

Pournelle — who died earlier this month — first rose to prominence as part of an influential group of right-wing science-fiction writers in the 1970s and 1980s that also included Larry Niven, David Drake, Janet Morris, and S. M. Stirling. All envisioned the best of a militarized humanity breaking away from the evils of bureaucracy and bleeding-hearts and aggressively colonizing and conquering space, exploiting its military and financial potential. Unlike most conservatives, all were less concerned with preserving the past for its own sake than for planning for the future—their preferred future.

In partnership with Niven, Pournelle’s science-fiction married aggressive military might with Atlas Shrugged-style techno-futurist fantasies and nativist paranoia, offering what in retrospect looks like an uncannily prescient portrait of the Trump era and its cultural overtones. Take, for example, the pair’s Hugo-nominated 1977 novel Lucifer’s Hammer, which depicts a small ranch of patriotic American farmers as they struggle to survive after a comet hits earth. Early on, the farmers debate how to keep out undesirables:

“They'll all be here, all that can get here," Christopher shouted. “Los Angeles, and the San Joaquin, and what's left of San Francisco … How long can we keep it up, lettin' those people come here?”


This kind of scene — the asterisks are mine; they spelled the word out — plays on the same fears Trump stoked in his campaign of immigrants and undesirables invading the “real” America. Yet Pournelle and Niven yoked this divisiveness to an Ayn Randian view of technological progress, in which there are those who work and those who leech.


Pournelle and Niven’s attitude toward civil-rights struggles and feminism wavers between condescension and irritation. Progressive issues are bumps on the road of progress. At their most dangerous, they radicalize lumpen segments of the population into dangerous terrorists: Antifa is one step on the way to the New Brotherhood Army.
Consequently, their attitudes on race and immigration come off as callous. In 2008, Niven told a DHS conference that “The problem [of hospitals going broke] is hugely exaggerated by illegal aliens who aren’t going to pay for anything anyway,” and then suggested spreading rumors in the Spanish Latino community that hospitals were killing patients to harvest their organs


Another obsession of Pournelle, who worked for years in the aerospace industry, was military conflict and how that might play out on, and beyond, our Earth. In the 80’s, he served as chair of the Citizen Advisory Council on National Space Policy. Alongside astronauts and physicists, the council included sci-fi luminaries such as Niven, Robert Heinlein, Greg Bear, Gregory Benford, and publisher Jim Baen.

The council also included Ronald Reagan’s adviser Lt. General Daniel O. Graham, whose advocacy firm High Frontier provided the primary political push for the president’s Strategic Defense Initiative (SDI). Better known as “Star Wars,” SDI represented the ultimate science-fiction defense project, a “shield” aimed at shooting down nuclear missiles with lasers from land and from space.

Pournelle’s council provided the blueprint for SDI—


SDI was only one part of a larger right-wing techno-futurist project. SDI historian Edward Linenthal cites a 1983 interview with Newt Gingrich in which the young conservative Congressman predicted that SDI would not just destroy Russia’s Communists but liberalism, too. SDI would be “a dagger at the heart of the liberal welfare state” because it destroys “the liberal myth of scarcity,” leaving only “the limits of a free people’s ingenuity, daring, and courage.”


No science-fiction writer since has exerted as significant a political influence as Pournelle. But Pournelle does have a spiritual successor in Castalia House, the independent science-fiction publisher run by white nationalist Theodore Beale, aka Vox Day. Beale, like Gingrich, has said that his job is to save Western Civilization—and that it is in dire need of saving. Beale, however, is far more explicit about race. In his definition of the Alt-Right, Beale proposes the 14th tenet, “The Alt Right believes we must secure the existence of white people and a future for white children,” stressing that homogeneous ethno-states are the only viable future for the world—and that the United States must be a white, Christian ethno-state. Though Beale has repeatedly denounced neo-Nazis, this tenet is near identical with the “Fourteen Words” of white supremacy, and its placement as the fourteenth item reads as a dog whistle.


The line that connects Pournelle, Gingrich and Trump is a view that the future must be secured through aggressive force, and specifically through authoritarian institutions (governmental or non-governmental) that group together humanity’s best and prevent the rest from stifling them. The difficulty, as always, lies in identifying “the best,” and in who’s doing the identification.


At the bottom of Pournelle’s website is the quote, “Freedom is not free. Free men are not equal. Equal men are not free.” It’s not attributed, but the sentiment is an old saw of the far right, going back at least to John Birch Society co-founder and segregationist Thomas J. Anderson in 1961. Today, Pournelle’s particular phrasing is most commonly attributed to white supremacist and anti-semite Richard Cotten. It’s one more indicator that Trump was far from the first to eliminate the line between right-wing thought and outright bigotry.


http://www.thedailybeast.com/from-lucifers-hammer-to-newts-moon-base-to-donalds-wallthe-sci-fi-roots-of-the-far-right

Cheers


https://www.jetpens.com/blog/highlighter-pens-a-comprehensive-guide/pt/606
aphronesis
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Re: U.S. Politics

23 Sep 2017 19:24

https://www.jetpens.com/blog/highlighter-pens-a-comprehensive-guide/pt/606

I like that gel type on the left. It is not a liquid but more like a marker almost. Reminds me of grease pencils and such.
"disc brake enlightenment"
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Re: U.S. Politics

23 Sep 2017 19:33

Semper Fidelis wrote:
https://www.jetpens.com/blog/highlighter-pens-a-comprehensive-guide/pt/606

I like that gel type on the left. It is not a liquid but more like a marker almost. Reminds me of grease pencils and such.


Yeah. Expressive but controlled. It's hard.
aphronesis
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Re:

23 Sep 2017 21:35

jmdirt wrote:Are the Rs burning their own empire with their healthcare scramble? The medical, pharma, and insurance kingdoms are built on more people paying more money so if one of their bills goes through, there will be less gold going to the machine.

Simple answer..no the GOP is not spamming there own nuts in the door by revisiting a health care fix..the Dems and Republicans both suffer from the same problems..a fractured population..no public forum to express plans in a comprehensive format..
The questions are never answered at the same sitting where they are asked..Take Bernie's points..we pay more for services..a child delivery..just standard vaginal birth..costs more in the US.. don't get the best results for mother and child..why?
We pay more for drugs? Why
Real money values paid by Americans are more than everyone else period..guy making @55,000 dollars a year is paying @$11,000-15,000 for health care in some employer co-payment hodgepodge...why? Would it be better or easier for that same guy to get the 11-15000 in pay and seek benefits without putting that on the employer..?
Why does a guy who owns a business selling steaks, repairing and selling bicycles or bathing suits know anything about providing quality health insurance to there employees? Is this logical? Does a Dairy Queen or Baskin Robbins franchise owner have good knowledge of health insurance? Why?
The Republicans are golden on questions not asked and answered..why keep using coal? Do ask don't have to tell.. why do we get or not get health care from work?..just because..is not an answer... because that's the way we do it.. again invalid..we don't use lead paint ,we use seat belts..we send our kids to school instead of the fields.. because of evolution and intelligence..we broke the tradition out of a sense of logic not the bottom line..
Paying more than the rest of the world for partial, inadequate, ineffective health care? Care that doesn't cover everyone...Why? Why don't we deserve better?or the best? Why should we not have the best health care?
Unchained
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Re:

23 Sep 2017 22:06

jmdirt wrote:Are the Rs burning their own empire with their healthcare scramble? The medical, pharma, and insurance kingdoms are built on more people paying more money so if one of their bills goes through, there will be less gold going to the machine.


I don't think so. I think this thing is not even going to come up for a vote. There's not much political will to do anything except posture while O-care crashes and burns. Then Medicare for all will emerge as a fix to the 'crisis.' Going back to the debate over the ACA, this was predicted, Obama later admitted, we aren't far from it now and I think this is essentially baked in the cake from both of the establishment party's.

Single payer here in less than 10 years, my prediction.

I think to some degree it's a bit pathetic. We as a people can't/won't figure out how to take care of ourselves. Pure laziness... and in exchange for that unimaginative laziness comes more liberty surrender as government bureaucrats increasingly make decisions for us. We just don't know what's best for us and our family. Maybe we never have.

Clearly the best have won enough elections to be at the D.C. central Command pulling our collective strings.
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User avatar Scott SoCal
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Re: Re:

23 Sep 2017 22:21

Unchained wrote:
jmdirt wrote:Are the Rs burning their own empire with their healthcare scramble? The medical, pharma, and insurance kingdoms are built on more people paying more money so if one of their bills goes through, there will be less gold going to the machine.

Simple answer..no the GOP is not spamming there own nuts in the door by revisiting a health care fix..the Dems and Republicans both suffer from the same problems..a fractured population..no public forum to express plans in a comprehensive format..
The questions are never answered at the same sitting where they are asked..Take Bernie's points..we pay more for services..a child delivery..just standard vaginal birth..costs more in the US.. don't get the best results for mother and child..why?
We pay more for drugs? Why
Real money values paid by Americans are more than everyone else period..guy making @55,000 dollars a year is paying @$11,000-15,000 for health care in some employer co-payment hodgepodge...why? Would it be better or easier for that same guy to get the 11-15000 in pay and seek benefits without putting that on the employer..?
Why does a guy who owns a business selling steaks, repairing and selling bicycles or bathing suits know anything about providing quality health insurance to there employees? Is this logical? Does a Dairy Queen or Baskin Robbins franchise owner have good knowledge of health insurance? Why?
The Republicans are golden on questions not asked and answered..why keep using coal? Do ask don't have to tell.. why do we get or not get health care from work?..just because..is not an answer... because that's the way we do it.. again invalid..we don't use lead paint ,we use seat belts..we send our kids to school instead of the fields.. because of evolution and intelligence..we broke the tradition out of a sense of logic not the bottom line..
Paying more than the rest of the world for partial, inadequate, ineffective health care? Care that doesn't cover everyone...Why? Why don't we deserve better?or the best? Why should we not have the best health care?


We pay more for services? Huh.

$50 billion a year in defensive medice practices. $15 billion a year in med-mal awards. Every nurse, PA and MD paying high med-mal liability insurance premiums. New York State OB/GYN's paying $200k per year, neurosurgeons paying $300k per year or more.

Yeah, I guess we should be thankful dipshits still actually want to be neurosurgeons.
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User avatar Scott SoCal
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Re: Re:

23 Sep 2017 22:56

Scott SoCal wrote:
Unchained wrote:
jmdirt wrote:Are the Rs burning their own empire with their healthcare scramble? The medical, pharma, and insurance kingdoms are built on more people paying more money so if one of their bills goes through, there will be less gold going to the machine.

Simple answer..no the GOP is not spamming there own nuts in the door by revisiting a health care fix..the Dems and Republicans both suffer from the same problems..a fractured population..no public forum to express plans in a comprehensive format..
The questions are never answered at the same sitting where they are asked..Take Bernie's points..we pay more for services..a child delivery..just standard vaginal birth..costs more in the US.. don't get the best results for mother and child..why?
We pay more for drugs? Why
Real money values paid by Americans are more than everyone else period..guy making @55,000 dollars a year is paying @$11,000-15,000 for health care in some employer co-payment hodgepodge...why? Would it be better or easier for that same guy to get the 11-15000 in pay and seek benefits without putting that on the employer..?
Why does a guy who owns a business selling steaks, repairing and selling bicycles or bathing suits know anything about providing quality health insurance to there employees? Is this logical? Does a Dairy Queen or Baskin Robbins franchise owner have good knowledge of health insurance? Why?
The Republicans are golden on questions not asked and answered..why keep using coal? Do ask don't have to tell.. why do we get or not get health care from work?..just because..is not an answer... because that's the way we do it.. again invalid..we don't use lead paint ,we use seat belts..we send our kids to school instead of the fields.. because of evolution and intelligence..we broke the tradition out of a sense of logic not the bottom line..
Paying more than the rest of the world for partial, inadequate, ineffective health care? Care that doesn't cover everyone...Why? Why don't we deserve better?or the best? Why should we not have the best health care?


We pay more for services? Huh.

$50 billion a year in defensive medice practices. $15 billion a year in med-mal awards. Every nurse, PA and MD paying high med-mal liability insurance premiums. New York State OB/GYN's paying $200k per year, neurosurgeons paying $300k per year or more.

Yeah, I guess we should be thankful dipshits still actually want to be neurosurgeons.


So you don't sweat the question of how "medicine" reached that stage of liability?
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23 Sep 2017 23:48

Secret Document Reveals Former CIA Director’s Plan to Make Reading WikiLeaks a Crime


A SECRET declassified report by then-CIA Director William Casey, titled, “Unauthorized Disclosures to the Media” proposed creating legislation that would make possession of classified information a criminal offense.

At the time that would make anyone reading a New York Times article with classified information, or WikiLeaks in the modern-era, criminally liable and able to be prosecuted by the state
.

https://www.globalresearch.ca/secret-document-reveals-former-cia-directors-plan-to-make-reading-wikileaks-a-crime/5610122

Cheers
User avatar blutto
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23 Sep 2017 23:53

Man. More news. Are you plugged i n or what. How about some more nonsensical commentary on what you're posting?
aphronesis
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Re: Re:

24 Sep 2017 00:55

aphronesis wrote:
So you don't sweat the question of how "medicine" reached that stage of liability?


Dunno. Poor education. Litigious society. Both. Neither.

The best part? When it's govt run you and I can sue the govt. We all know how successful that usually is.

But, hey.... I'm sure the doctors will try harder when the taxpayer is on the hook for malpractice and everything.
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User avatar Scott SoCal
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24 Sep 2017 01:03

Not sure your point.

Anyway medicine being marketizex didn't render it less useful or medicinal?
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24 Sep 2017 04:55

movingtarget
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Re: Re:

24 Sep 2017 06:19

Scott SoCal wrote:
jmdirt wrote:Are the Rs burning their own empire with their healthcare scramble? The medical, pharma, and insurance kingdoms are built on more people paying more money so if one of their bills goes through, there will be less gold going to the machine.


I don't think so. I think this thing is not even going to come up for a vote. There's not much political will to do anything except posture while O-care crashes and burns. Then Medicare for all will emerge as a fix to the 'crisis.' Going back to the debate over the ACA, this was predicted, Obama later admitted, we aren't far from it now and I think this is essentially baked in the cake from both of the establishment party's.

Single payer here in less than 10 years, my prediction.

I think to some degree it's a bit pathetic. We as a people can't/won't figure out how to take care of ourselves. Pure laziness... and in exchange for that unimaginative laziness comes more liberty surrender as government bureaucrats increasingly make decisions for us. We just don't know what's best for us and our family. Maybe we never have.

Clearly the best have won enough elections to be at the D.C. central Command pulling our collective strings.


But the insurance and litigation aspects result from the lobbies (imaginative diligence?) having the necessary pressure to bear in Washington, to get government bureaucrats to increasingly deny them affordable healthcare.

Yet these market and political forces have no bearing on outcomes, people are just lazy and don't know how to take care of themselves.

What would happen if those forces were removed? Perhaps lazy people who don't have a fighting chance would become empowered to "start taking care of themselves." I realize this is tough when insurance bosses can almost say Off with his head and when officials of supper-lobbyists forget their haemorrhoids by imagining that their shabby chairs were thrones. And, of course, in real life, for the last 5,000 years, the vast majority of humans have been submissive, cringing before authority, apart from short-lived outbursts of protest, sacrificing themselves so that a small minority could live in luxury.
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Re: U.S. Politics

24 Sep 2017 10:33

Pat Buchanan: "America Has No Divinely-Mandated Mission To Democratize Mankind


Authored by Patrick Buchanan via Buchanan.org,

If a U.S. president calls an adversary “Rocket Man … on a mission to suicide,” and warns his nation may be “totally destroyed,” other ideas in his speech will tend to get lost.

Which is unfortunate.

For buried in Donald Trump’s address is a clarion call to reject transnationalism and to re-embrace a world of sovereign nation-states that cherish their independence and unique identities.

Western man has engaged in this great quarrel since Woodrow Wilson declared America would fight in the Great War, not for any selfish interests, but “to make the world safe for democracy.”


Translation: We Americans have created something unique in history. But we do not assert that we should serve as a model for mankind. Among the 190 nations, others have evolved in different ways from diverse cultures, histories, traditions. We may reject their values but we have no God-given right to impose ours upon them.

It is difficult to reconcile Trump’s belief in self-determination with a National Endowment for Democracy whose reason for being is to interfere in the politics of other nations to make them more like us.

Trump’s idea of patriotism has deep roots in America’s past.

After the uprisings of 1848 against the royal houses of Europe failed, Lajos Kossuth came to seek support for the cause of Hungarian democracy. He was wildly welcomed and hailed by Secretary of State Daniel Webster.

But Henry Clay, more true to the principles of Washington’s Farewell Address, admonished Kossuth:

“Far better is it for ourselves, for Hungary, and for the cause of liberty that, adhering to our wise, pacific system, and avoiding the distant wars of Europe, we should keep our lamp burning brightly on the western shore as a light to all nations, than to hazard its utter extinction amid the ruins of fallen or falling republics in Europe.”

Trump’s U.N. address echoed Clay: “In foreign affairs, we are renewing this founding principle of sovereignty. Our government’s first duty is to its people … to serve their needs, to ensure their safety, to preserve their rights, and to defend their values.”

Trump is saying with John Quincy Adams that our mission is not to go “abroad in search of monsters to destroy,” but to “put America first.”

He is repudiating the New World Order of Bush I, the democracy crusades of the neocons of the Bush II era, and the globaloney of Obama.

Trump’s rhetoric implies intent; and action is evident from Rex Tillerson’s directive to his department to rewrite its mission statement — and drop the bit about making the world democratic.

The current statement reads: “The Department’s mission is to shape and sustain a peaceful, prosperous, just, and democratic world.”

Tillerson should stand his ground. For America has no divinely mandated mission to democratize mankind. And the hubristic idea that we do has been a cause of all the wars and disasters that have lately befallen the republic.

If we do not cure ourselves of this interventionist addiction, it will end our republic. When did we dethrone our God and divinize democracy?

And are 21st-century American values really universal values?


Should all nations embrace same-sex marriage, abortion on demand, and the separation of church and state if that means, as it has come to mean here, the paganization of public education and the public square?

If freedom of speech and the press here have produced a popular culture that is an open sewer and a politics of vilification and venom, why would we seek to impose this upon other peoples?

For the State Department to declare America’s mission to be to make all nations look more like us might well be regarded as a uniquely American form of moral imperialism.


http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2017-09-22/buchanan-america-has-no-divinely-mandated-mission-democratize-mankind

Cheers
User avatar blutto
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Re: U.S. Politics

24 Sep 2017 10:36

Hillary Clinton on guns in What Happened - Hitting Sanders hard on his pro NRA voting


Page 185-186
Guns became a flash point in both the primaries and the general election. Bernie Sanders, who loved to talk about how "true progressives" never bow to political realities or powerful interests, had long bowed to the political reality of his rural state of Vermont and supported the NRA's key priorities, including voting against the Brady Bill five times in the 1990s. In 2005, he voted for that special immunity law that protects gun makers and sellers from being sued when their weapons are used in deadly attacks. The NRA said the Protection of Lawful Commerce in Arms Act was the most important gun-related legislation in more than twenty years. Then-Senator Barack Obama and I had voted against it. I couldn't believe Bernie continued to support the law ten years later when he ran for President.

I hammered him on the issue every chance I got. We had a revealing exchange in a town hall debate in March 2016. A man stepped up to the microphone to ask a question. His fourteen-year-old daughter had been shot in the head during a shooting spree outside a Cracker Barrel restaurant. After a few scary days on life support, she pulled through and ended up being the lone survivor of the attack. The father asked what we were going to do to address the epidemic of gun violence stalking our country.

"I am looking at your daughter, and I'm very grateful that she is laughing and she is on the road to recovery," I said. "But it never should have happened." I told him about some of the steps I wanted to take to keep families safe, including repealing the immunity protection for gun manufacturers. The moderator then asked Bernie his thoughts about a new lawsuit challenging that corporate immunity. To my surprised, the Senator doubled down. He argued passionately that people like me who talked about suing gun makers were really talking about "ending gun manufacturing in America." To him, the idea that a manufacturer could be held liable for what happens with its gun was tantamount to saying that "there should not be any guns in America." I couldn't have disagreed more strongly. No other industry in our country has the kind of protection he supported for gun manufacturers. And in every other situation, he was the loudest voice in the room calling for corporations to be held accountable for their actions. Why was this one issue so different? As I told the crowd, it was like he was reading straight from the NRA's talking points. After months of pressure from activists and victims' families, Bernie finally said he would reconsider his vote.


https://www.democraticunderground.com/10029627717

Cheers
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24 Sep 2017 11:32

Trump lecturing others on patriotism.
How many times did he dodge the draft?
User avatar Jagartrott
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Re: U.S. Politics

24 Sep 2017 11:43

The worst mistake in U.S. history was the conversion after World War II of the U.S. government from a constitutional, limited-government republic to a national-security state. Nothing has done more to warp and distort the conscience, principles, and values of the American people, including those who serve in the U.S. military.

A good example of how the national-security state has adversely affected the thinking of U.S. soldiers was reflected in an op-ed entitled “What We’re Fighting For” that appeared in the February 10, 2017, issue of the New York Times. Authored by an Iraq War veteran named Phil Klay, the article demonstrates perfectly what the national-security state has done to soldiers and others and why it is so imperative for the American people to restore a constitutional republic to our land.


https://www.globalresearch.ca/the-worst-mistake-in-us-history/5610136

Cheers
User avatar blutto
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Re: U.S. Politics

24 Sep 2017 11:43

blutto wrote:
Pat Buchanan: "America Has No Divinely-Mandated Mission To Democratize Mankind


Authored by Patrick Buchanan via Buchanan.org,

If a U.S. president calls an adversary “Rocket Man … on a mission to suicide,” and warns his nation may be “totally destroyed,” other ideas in his speech will tend to get lost.

Which is unfortunate.

For buried in Donald Trump’s address is a clarion call to reject transnationalism and to re-embrace a world of sovereign nation-states that cherish their independence and unique identities.

Western man has engaged in this great quarrel since Woodrow Wilson declared America would fight in the Great War, not for any selfish interests, but “to make the world safe for democracy.”


Translation: We Americans have created something unique in history. But we do not assert that we should serve as a model for mankind. Among the 190 nations, others have evolved in different ways from diverse cultures, histories, traditions. We may reject their values but we have no God-given right to impose ours upon them.

It is difficult to reconcile Trump’s belief in self-determination with a National Endowment for Democracy whose reason for being is to interfere in the politics of other nations to make them more like us.

Trump’s idea of patriotism has deep roots in America’s past.

After the uprisings of 1848 against the royal houses of Europe failed, Lajos Kossuth came to seek support for the cause of Hungarian democracy. He was wildly welcomed and hailed by Secretary of State Daniel Webster.

But Henry Clay, more true to the principles of Washington’s Farewell Address, admonished Kossuth:

“Far better is it for ourselves, for Hungary, and for the cause of liberty that, adhering to our wise, pacific system, and avoiding the distant wars of Europe, we should keep our lamp burning brightly on the western shore as a light to all nations, than to hazard its utter extinction amid the ruins of fallen or falling republics in Europe.”

Trump’s U.N. address echoed Clay: “In foreign affairs, we are renewing this founding principle of sovereignty. Our government’s first duty is to its people … to serve their needs, to ensure their safety, to preserve their rights, and to defend their values.”

Trump is saying with John Quincy Adams that our mission is not to go “abroad in search of monsters to destroy,” but to “put America first.”

He is repudiating the New World Order of Bush I, the democracy crusades of the neocons of the Bush II era, and the globaloney of Obama.

Trump’s rhetoric implies intent; and action is evident from Rex Tillerson’s directive to his department to rewrite its mission statement — and drop the bit about making the world democratic.

The current statement reads: “The Department’s mission is to shape and sustain a peaceful, prosperous, just, and democratic world.”

Tillerson should stand his ground. For America has no divinely mandated mission to democratize mankind. And the hubristic idea that we do has been a cause of all the wars and disasters that have lately befallen the republic.

If we do not cure ourselves of this interventionist addiction, it will end our republic. When did we dethrone our God and divinize democracy?

And are 21st-century American values really universal values?


Should all nations embrace same-sex marriage, abortion on demand, and the separation of church and state if that means, as it has come to mean here, the paganization of public education and the public square?

If freedom of speech and the press here have produced a popular culture that is an open sewer and a politics of vilification and venom, why would we seek to impose this upon other peoples?

For the State Department to declare America’s mission to be to make all nations look more like us might well be regarded as a uniquely American form of moral imperialism.


http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2017-09-22/buchanan-america-has-no-divinely-mandated-mission-democratize-mankind

Cheers



More Buchanan from the blutto dawg. Finger on the pulse. Of 1982. or '63, or something.
aphronesis
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