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Re:

02 Nov 2017 17:32

djpbaltimore wrote:I've said it before, but President Sanders mostly has his own self to blame for his total inability to even compete in the southern states. I doubt the DNC had much sway in how people voted in the primary.


They did control the number ( as few as possible ) of debates, which certainly had some impact. That said, you're correct, he simply didn't have enough appeal to minorities.

A fair fight it was not, and it should have been.
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02 Nov 2017 19:10

I agree that there were decisions made about things like the number of debates that seemed to play into the Clinton campaign's hands and she no doubt benefited by being a part of the party apparatus in countless ways. From that perspective, it was not a fair fight. Maybe I am in the minority, but I just don't think the DNC does much to move votes in the real world. I am seeing a lot on Twitter about how Sanders lost because of this.

As for class interests, it doesn't resonate much with democrats around here. It is an abstract idea that motivates activists in Baltimore county more than your typical voter in Baltimore city. If Sanders runs again in 2020, I think he has to do better with his message to poor minority dems. Most don't really believe the notion that unrigging the economy will benefit them even if it sounds good on the stump. He has to make a more direct personal appeal.
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02 Nov 2017 19:27

I think one also has to consider how important the Superdelegates were, how they were basically in the tank for Clinton.

https://ctmirror.org/2016/07/28/dems-set-to-reform-rules-on-superdelegates-that-aided-clinton/
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Re:

02 Nov 2017 20:35

djpbaltimore wrote:I agree that there were decisions made about things like the number of debates that seemed to play into the Clinton campaign's hands and she no doubt benefited by being a part of the party apparatus in countless ways. From that perspective, it was not a fair fight. Maybe I am in the minority, but I just don't think the DNC does much to move votes in the real world. I am seeing a lot on Twitter about how Sanders lost because of this.

As for class interests, it doesn't resonate much with democrats around here. It is an abstract idea that motivates activists in Baltimore county more than your typical voter in Baltimore city. If Sanders runs again in 2020, I think he has to do better with his message to poor minority dems. Most don't really believe the notion that unrigging the economy will benefit them even if it sounds good on the stump. He has to make a more direct personal appeal.


Yeah like Trump did. Sounds like a plan.
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02 Nov 2017 20:59

Ask the coal-miners if they heard a personal appeal from Trump. The fact that he means none of it doesn't dispute the observation that he was able to personalize his voters' grievances in a really innovative way. See also: Anthem protests. I wouldn't have thought it possible that he could make his voters turn against footbaw.

I would ditch the Super-delegates entirely and make the state contests either all primary or all caucus and make them all open or all closed.
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Re: U.S. Politics

02 Nov 2017 23:01

Parties go for the candidate that they think has the best chance to win, rally the center, and Sanders didn't fit the bill. He's an Independent who tried to high-jack the party. I understand the DNC position. On the GOP side, once Bush was gone, Rubio showed signs of weakness, support for Cruz never mustered. Trump tea-partied the tea party, who had high-jacked the GOP.
SOLO LA VITTORIA È BELLA
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Re:

03 Nov 2017 02:32

Jagartrott wrote:https://www.theguardian.com/technology/2017/nov/02/russian-hacking-beyond-us-election-digital-hitlist

The list skewed toward workers for defense contractors such as Boeing, Raytheon and Lockheed Martin or senior intelligence figures, prominent Russia watchers and – especially – Democrats. More than 130 party workers, campaign staffers and supporters of the party were targeted, including Podesta and other members of Clinton’s inner circle.

Velo?
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03 Nov 2017 03:24

aphronesis
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Re: U.S. Politics

03 Nov 2017 16:58

The medical journal Lancet has just published a detailed study of the effects of climate change on public health, the first of what apparently will be a series of annual reports. The emphasis is not on what will or might happen--though one can certainly read between the lines on that--but what has already happened. The same issue also has a short report on the opioid crisis, pointing out the flaws in Trump’s approach.

http://www.thelancet.com/journals/lancet/article/PIIS0140-6736(17)32809-X/fulltext?elsca1=etoc

You need to register to view the entire article on climate change (a brief summary is available without registering), but registration is free.

Climate change affects human health primarily through three pathways: direct, ecosystem-mediated, and human institution-mediated pathways.13 Direct effects are diverse, being mediated, for instance, by increases in the frequency, intensity, and duration of extreme heat and by increases in average annual temperature (leading to, for example, greater heat-related mortality). Rising incidence of other extremes of weather, such as floods and storms, increase the risk of drowning and injury, damage to human settlements, spread of water-borne disease, and mental health sequelae.13 Ecosystem-mediated impacts include changes in the distribution and burden of vector-borne diseases (such as malaria and dengue) and water-borne infectious disease. Human undernutrition from crop failure, population displacement from sea-level rise, and occupational health risks are examples of human institution-mediated impacts.

Although reported data, and indeed some of the data presented here, have traditionally focused on impacts such as the spread of infectious diseases and mortality from extreme weather, the health effects from non-communicable diseases are just as important. Mediated through a variety of pathways, they take the form of cardiovascular disease, acute and chronic respiratory disease from worsening air pollution and aero-allergens, or the often-unseen mental health effects of extreme weather events or of population displacement.14, 15 Indeed, emerging evidence is suggesting links between a rising incidence of chronic kidney disease, dehydration, and climate change.16, 17

Eight indicators were selected and developed for this section.


Indicator 1.1: Health effects of temperature change

This indicator reports that people experience far more than the global mean temperature rise. This indicator reports that between 2000 and 2016, human exposure to warming was about 0·9 °C, more than double the global area average temperature rise during the same period.

Increasing temperatures can exacerbate existing health problems in populations and introduce new health threats (including cardiovascular disease and chronic kidney disease). The extent to which human populations are exposed to this temperature change, and thus the health implications of temperature change, depends on the detailed spatiotemporal trends of population and temperature over time.


Indicator 1.2: Health effects of heatwaves

This indicator reports that between 2000 and 2016, the number of vulnerable people exposed to heatwave events increased by about 125 million, with a record 175 million more people exposed to heatwaves in 2015.

The health impacts of extreme heat range from direct heat stress and heat stroke, to exacerbations of pre-existing heart failure, and even an increased incidence of acute kidney injury from dehydration in vulnerable populations. Elderly people, children younger than 12 months, and people with chronic cardiovascular and renal disease are particularly sensitive to these changes.


Indicator 1.3: Change in labour capacity

This indicator reports that global labour capacity in rural populations exposed to temperature change is estimated to have decreased by 5·3% from 2000 to 2016.

Higher temperatures pose profound threats to occupational health and labour productivity, particularly for people undertaking manual, outdoor labour in hot areas.


Indicator 1.4: Lethality of weather-related disasters

This indicator reports that the frequency of weather-related disasters has increased by 46% from 2007 to 2016 (compared with the 1990–99 average), with no clear upward or downward trend in the lethality of these extreme events.

Weather-related events have been associated with more than 90% of all disasters worldwide in the past 20 years. As expected, considering its population and area, Asia is the continent most affected by weather-related disasters. 2843 events were recorded between 1990 and 2016, affecting 4·8 billion people and killing 505 013 people. Deaths from natural hazard-related disasters are largely concentrated in poor countries.21 Crucially, this must be understood in the context of potentially overwhelming health impacts of future climate change, worsening profoundly in the coming years. Indeed, the 2015 Lancet Commission estimated that an additional 1·4 billion drought exposure events and 2·3 billion flood exposure events will occur by the end of the century, showing clear public health limits to adaptation.


Indicator 1.6: Climate-sensitive infectious diseases

This indicator reports that climate trends have led to a global increase in the vectorial capacity for the transmission of dengue from A aegypti and Aedes albopictus, of 3·0% and 5·9%, respectively, compared with 1990 levels, and of 9·4% and 11·1%, respectively, compared with 1950 levels.


Annual numbers of cases of dengue fever have doubled every decade since 1990, with 58·4 million apparent cases (95% CI 23·6 million–121·9 million) in 2013, accounting for more than 10 000 deaths and 1·14 million disability-adjusted life-years (95% CI 0·73 million–1·98 million).36 Climate change has been suggested as one potential contributor to this increase in burden.37 A aegypti and A albopictus also carry other important emerging or re-emerging arboviruses, including Yellow Fever, Chikungunya, Mayaro, and Zika viruses, which are probably similarly responsive to climate change.


Indicator 1.7: Food security and undernutrition

Isolating the impact of climate change on health through the indirect impacts on food security is complicated because policies, institutions, and the actions of individuals, organisations, and countries strongly influence the extent to which food systems are resilient to climate hazards and adapt to climate change and whether individual households are able to access and afford sufficient nutritious food.


Increasing temperatures have been shown to reduce global wheat production by 6% for each 1°C increase.43, 44, 45 Rice yields are sensitive to increases in night temperatures, with each 1°C increase in growing-season minimum temperature in the dry season resulting in a 10% decrease in rice grain yield.46 Higher temperatures have been demonstrated rigorously to have a negative impact on crop yields in countries in lower latitudes.47, 48, 49 Moreover, agriculture in lower latitudes tends to be more marginal, and more people are food insecure.


The regions with the highest vulnerability to undernutrition are also areas where yield losses due to climate warming are predicted to be relatively high, thus increasing the vulnerability of these populations to the negative health consequences of undernutrition. High dependence on one crop increases the vulnerability of a country further. For example, Kenya, with a domestic production dependency for cereals of almost 80%, is 69% dependent on maize, is experiencing high levels of undernutrition, and is particularly vulnerable to climate-related yield losses/


Decreasing fish consumption is an indication of food insecurity, especially in local shoreline communities that depend on marine sources for food. These communities are especially vulnerable to any decreases in marine primary productivity affecting fish stocks.52 This is particularly concerning for the 1 billion people in the world who rely on fish as their principal source of protein, placing them at increased risk of stunting (prevented from growing or developing properly) and malnutrition from food insecurity.53 Fish are also important for providing micronutrients such as zinc, iron, vitamin A, vitamin B12, and omega-3 fatty acids. If fish stocks continue to decrease, up to 1·4 billion people are estimated to become deficient and at increased risk of certain diseases, particularly those associated with the cardiovascular system.


Indicator 1.8: Migration and population displacement

This indicator reports that climate change is the sole contributing factor for at least 4400 people who are already being forced to migrate, worldwide. The total number of people vulnerable to migration might increase to 1 billion by the end of the century without significant further action on climate change.


When I first saw that 4400 number, I thought it was a typo, it seemed so low relative to the millions or billions of people potentially affected by climate change. But these are people whose migration has been documented to be solely due to climate change, and relatively few as they are now, might be the harbinger of far more whose migration might be partially the result of climate change, or in the future, also entirely the result of climate change.
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Re: National Football League

03 Nov 2017 17:31

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03 Nov 2017 20:46

..wanted to share some thoughts.

i am a regular around the parts of the west side bike path where the terrorist committed his atrocity. i mean, at least once a week, usually early morning, i cover a 10 mile round trip loop from the Stuyvesant school to the boat basin and back...this morning was the only free morn
i had this week. i hesitated to roller ski there laden by the tragedy thoughts. later in the day i found the courage and did my usual thing.

btwn the Houston and the Stuyvesant school (almost a mile), that is exactly where the terrorist entered the path and committed his crime, i found lots of concrete barriers hastily installed, so that, i guess, the crime scene could not be repeated in the SAME segment of the bike path.

makes sense, doesn't it ? at the same time i counted at least a half dozen crossings (along a .9 mi stretch) where ANY terrorist nut could enter the bike path easily and commit the SAME atrocity. i wondered why and asked 2 cops stations along the crossings...they said little reasonable in response. moreover, there was almost none of the blocking/protecting the bike path north of Houston.

i can't get calm thinking about it...Why, why ?? well, clearly, there is too much work to protect the the appr 32 miles of the Manhattan perimeter in the time allowed. by prioritizing the stretch that just was attacked (protected poorly as i just explained) make a perfect political story, but sadly not very rational in my view.

hope i am not overreacting or, as is my usual, over analyzing the very sad occurrence... :rolleyes:
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03 Nov 2017 21:16

No, you’re not. This is a standard symbolic panacea for a crisis event. Particularly when the US can’t think the event. What’s to stop a motorist from going onto the loops at Prospect or Central Parks and letting rip?
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03 Nov 2017 22:10

When something happens in an area that you frequent, there is no overreacting IMO, your mental/emotional state are affected. You can't expect a rational response from government agencies, they did exactly what I would expect them to do.
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Re:

03 Nov 2017 23:01

jmdirt wrote:When something happens in an area that you frequent, there is no overreacting IMO, your mental/emotional state are affected. You can't expect a rational response from government agencies, they did exactly what I would expect them to do.

A little to Aphro's point and yours .. I have ridden in the exact spot 1000's of times..had moments of fear when people were not trying to intentionally kill me.. I have raced at Floyd Bennett, Central and Prospect parks when there was some traffic on the course.I have raced and ridden in semi- beautiful T-neck NJ and have thought from time to time while drudging up 9W I may get squished..
The point that none of us.. parents, pedestrians or pedalers want to talk about.. the pointless start and end to a hopeless discussion.. If a person driving a car or truck wants to kill you they can.. simple as that.. If a Range Rover or dump truck driver chooses me.. that's the end.. there is no logical cultural,legal or design that can eliminate the current version of our lives..
And yes it fvcks. up your head when a common location in your life is a crime scene.
And just so it is clear to anyone here that doesn't know better. New York doesn't have the death penalty.. so as it applies to this case it is idiotic to explore make believe.. people need real life help and support and solutions to these problems so to have are initial direction be into fantasy is fvcking. stupid
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04 Nov 2017 04:25

jmdirt
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04 Nov 2017 12:20

aphronesis
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Re:

04 Nov 2017 14:08

jmdirt wrote:When something happens in an area that you frequent, there is no overreacting IMO, your mental/emotional state are affected. You can't expect a rational response from government agencies, they did exactly what I would expect them to do.


Of course it is perfectly understandable for those who frequent those areas to be affected emotionally, but it's really a rather disturbing thing in my mind when the agencies responsible for public safety can't react rationally to threats for public safety.

As far as I'm concerned, politicians, governments and the media make terrorism more effective by the way they often overreact. Terrorism wouldn't have the same impact and influence on society it has now, without emotional overreaction by politicians and the media and ineffective safety measures which don't prevent any future attacks but just make people feel less safe. Furthermore, in the worst case scenario politicians can even exploit the irrational public fear of terrorism to push for more liberties in their intelligence services in the name of fighting terrorism.

Again, I want to stress my criticism isn't aimed at the individuals who live or work or commute in the area or the victims or their loved ones. For them it is obviously an enormous tragedy. My criticism is aimed at irrational public fear and ****** policies by government agencies which do more harm than good.
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04 Nov 2017 14:19

Of course a terrorist attack is meant to cause fear (hence the name), but the real (rational) problem for US cyclists lies in failing infrastructure, poor mentality towards cyclists and over-sized cars. "U.S. cyclists are three times more likely to be killed than German cyclists and six times more than Dutch cyclists, whether compared per-trip or per-distance travelled."
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04 Nov 2017 16:02

As I've stated, I'm not a political historian, I just don't find politics interesting enough to become an expert on what has happened. Plus, I get very frustrated/angry at politicians, lobbyist, and the bureaucracy. With that said, I've read more about politics in the last 10 years, but I read about current politics to decide how it affects me.

With that preface, I ask: Why are conservatives willing to create trillions in debt? Is it solely a "take from everyone to give to the rich" scheme? Are there citizens who think that any part of this is good? Even if they are party Rs/Trump supporters, can they see anything that will help them? Maybe they are buying the ruse that the economy will grow because of this?

Won't this be considerably worse than Reaganomics?
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