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The DIY thread

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Re: Re:

13 Aug 2016 20:54

Hon, at this point I'd say you need to hire a pro... have no idea why you're drilling more holes than you've already got.
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Re: Re:

13 Aug 2016 21:05

Tricycle Rider wrote:Hon, at this point I'd say you need to hire a pro... have no idea why you're drilling more holes than you've already got.


nah, no pro for this one. No explosion danger this time, just some consideration as to what will look best (the drainage is located in another room from where the tumble dryer is).
Dazed and Confused
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Re: Re:

13 Aug 2016 21:12

Dazed and Confused wrote:
Tricycle Rider wrote:Hon, at this point I'd say you need to hire a pro... have no idea why you're drilling more holes than you've already got.


nah, no pro for this one. No explosion danger this time, just some consideration as to what will look best (the drainage is located in another room from where the tumble dryer is).
So you are all clear of the electrical stuff when you're drilling?
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Re: Re:

13 Aug 2016 21:24

Tricycle Rider wrote:
Dazed and Confused wrote:
Tricycle Rider wrote:Hon, at this point I'd say you need to hire a pro... have no idea why you're drilling more holes than you've already got.


nah, no pro for this one. No explosion danger this time, just some consideration as to what will look best (the drainage is located in another room from where the tumble dryer is).
So you are all clear of the electrical stuff when you're drilling?


ah right I see. No not afraid of cables in the wall, none in the area that I need to drill. Its the tiles I don't want to drill in. Looking for alternatives now....
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Re: Re:

13 Aug 2016 21:32

Dazed and Confused wrote:
Tricycle Rider wrote:
Dazed and Confused wrote:
Tricycle Rider wrote:Hon, at this point I'd say you need to hire a pro... have no idea why you're drilling more holes than you've already got.


nah, no pro for this one. No explosion danger this time, just some consideration as to what will look best (the drainage is located in another room from where the tumble dryer is).
So you are all clear of the electrical stuff when you're drilling?


ah right I see. No not afraid of cables in the wall, none in the area that I need to drill. Its the tiles I don't want to drill in. Looking for alternatives now....
There's only one way to saw a tile, and that's with a proper wet saw. (Used to work at a tile place as well.)
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13 Aug 2016 21:47

you've been around TR. Here is the deal. I like the tiles a lot. Holes not wanted, so now looking to see if I can extend the tube and still get rid of the excessive water. Waiting for a replay......salesperson......
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14 Aug 2016 02:16

The thing that I love about VW bugs is that there are boat loads of products available. You can back off the fenders and install new rubber. All the interior stuff is pretty easy to install.. new floor pans,cranks and handles. You can be driving a 45 year old new car if you want to.. don't get me going about these guys that have kits to install Subaru motors in a bunch of VW cars,vans and transporters!!!
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Re:

17 Aug 2016 20:51

fatandfast wrote:The thing that I love about VW bugs is that there are boat loads of products available. You can back off the fenders and install new rubber. All the interior stuff is pretty easy to install.. new floor pans,cranks and handles. You can be driving a 45 year old new car if you want to.. don't get me going about these guys that have kits to install Subaru motors in a bunch of VW cars,vans and transporters!!!
I can't disagree with that, there are all kind of parts you can mostly get ahold of for such an old car. (Some engine and electrical parts can be a bit trickier though, or so my overpriced VW mechanic tells me.)

And on that note...

Still working on the Bug paint job, and seeing as I don't have any kind of fancy tools, nor professional space to work with/in, I have to pay attention to the wind outdoors, seeing as the driveway is where I do my spray painting.

For this this kind of tool comes in handy, it's just a simple wind spinner. (If the wind is too high or going in the wrong direction - just DON'T do it!)Image
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18 Aug 2016 16:49

Ta-daa!

Besides the doors (and some spot painting here and there) I am finally done with the BUG!

Image

With any luck the roof won't leak, and this whole process won't have to take place again something like four years from now. Yay!

How are your tile doing, btw., Dazed and C?
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12 Oct 2016 22:09

It's that time of the year again where we need to get our cars (or bikes) ready for winter, so, so far I changed my oil, and had to change the windshield wipers on the ole '67 Bug.

Next comes rotating the tires (have to have a pro do this since I don't have the equipment for it, and some of you will have to change to proper winter tires), but after that I'm all done.

Ya'll getting ready for some winter weather now? Say yes! :)
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03 Nov 2016 18:59

Update on the roof job I did on my Bug earlier this summer, seeing as we are nearly breaking records in terms of rain in my parts of the world...

So far no leaks, and the roof seems to be holding up well. Well, except for that one small blistered area that I had decided to pop (I really shouldn't have done that)...

I have to sand that small area, add some Bondo, sand some more, add some FlexSeal, and then gloriously finish with a coat (or three) of paint.

Truly this is just cosmetic, but it's bugging me enough to where I need to do it.
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03 Nov 2016 21:13

Another recycled DIY tip for those who do your own water sprinkler stuff...

Mark your sprinklers before the bad weather comes in (and covers your sprinklers with mud, grass, and the odd golfer who may have lost his/her way during the Masters), this year I'm going with the bamboo sticks.

Image
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03 Nov 2016 23:03

An important consideration about DIY is that with complex assemblies it can be difficult to completely identify ALL of the things that are broken or not working as well as they should. If you do disassembly you might find that other things are wrong after you install the new part. Or worse you disassemble and damage something and then find that the replacement parts aren't easily available - so now you've got something that doesn't work at all, where before it just wasn't working 100%.

Another consideration is whether you can do a true FIX, as opposed to a PATCH that will work for a while but then need to be re-done or really fixed. A patch is fine for a short time, but be sure to continue the process of getting it really fixed - either by DIY or by a pro.

Jay Kosta
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05 Nov 2016 19:28

Good tips, Jay Kosta!

Case in point...

Boneheaded project to do while it's raining, but my dad's lawnmower wouldn't work, the cord got jammed. So in my infinite wisdom I decided to take the cord whatchamacallit apart, had no idea there was a coil in there, which of course uncoiled when I took the whatchamacall it off. (Very bad words had been thought and said at that point.)

Laboriously I had put the coil and other parts back together, but still had the same problem with the cord jamming. Looked up more tips on Youtube, turns out the blade shaft was covered with all kinds of crap, so once I cleared that the mower did start.

So in my super infinite wisdom I decided to lube the shaft, now the mower won't start again. (Very bad words had been thought and spoken once again!)

Don't know if it was the rain or the lube, but I ended up buying a new spark plug and air filter. So now I just have to wait for the engine to dry to see if that was even needed...

Moral of the story (I think) - don't fix it if it ain't broke! (And especially if you don't know what you're doing.)
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07 Nov 2016 20:31

Of all the boneheaded things...

Turns out my dad had turned the gas choke to "off" on the lawnmower while I was busy trying to diagnose other potential problems, once he turned the gas back on (most likely by pure accident seeing as he's not fond of reading owner's manuals) the lawnmower worked again.

I had forgotten the lawnmower even had a gas choke, it was the first thing I should have checked after I got the pull rope situation all fixed.

Think I'll just go stick my head in the toilet now and flush a few times, obviously my brain is full of ****!
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Re:

07 Nov 2016 20:59

Tricycle Rider wrote:Of all the boneheaded things...

Turns out my dad had turned the gas choke to "off" on the lawnmower while I was busy trying to diagnose other potential problems, once he turned the gas back on (most likely by pure accident seeing as he's not fond of reading owner's manuals) the lawnmower worked again.

I had forgotten the lawnmower even had a gas choke, it was the first thing I should have checked after I got the pull rope situation all fixed.

Think I'll just go stick my head in the toilet now and flush a few times, obviously my brain is full of ****!

:D
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"Nothing seems to blind peeps as much as patriotism does it!"
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17 Jan 2017 13:42

It being winter and freezing outside I had to find a quick fix for the garage door - there was about a 2inch gap between the top of the door and the house wall itself. (Not sure if the door is warped or if a part of the wall is missing, think it's the latter.) Lots of cold air came in, especially when it was windy. Brrrrrrr!

The best fix would have been to somehow spackle the gap, which is only in the center of the door, to where you could actually still open the vertical lift door, but I was in no mood for that because it was freaking freezing! So I bought some window foam insulation and applied that, it seems to be hanging in there, but just barely. (Have to reinforce the sticky part with some mounting tape, or even duct tape, otherwise the foam comes off when the door is moving up or down. Grrr...)

Image

I'll have to look for a more permanent solution once the weather gets better, no way will I be arsed with it right now. (At least I haven't done anything completely stupid, but just give me some time, I'm sure I'll find a way to break that garage door.)
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17 Jan 2017 15:05

In addition to the window foam, you might also look at the round foam that goes around large water pipes.

Jay Kosta
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Re:

17 Jan 2017 21:18

JayKosta wrote:In addition to the window foam, you might also look at the round foam that goes around large water pipes.

Jay Kosta
Endwell NY USA
I see what you're saying, and I definitely appreciate the tip.

The issue with this project is the width of insulation has to be just perfect - if there is too much friction at the top the damn door won't shut completely, which means I'll have a gap at the bottom. If there isn't enough I won't have insulation. Ugh!

Here's what I'm working with, I just crazy-glued the window foam on for now, hopefully it'll hold. Image

This second project is much easier... I'm not about to buy a whole new mop, this is something that duct tape can definitely fix. Yay!

Before: Image

After: :D Image
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23 Jan 2017 20:57

Right, so once again it's time for a DIY beauty makeover tip...

Seeing as I'm too cheap to pay somebody else to cut my hair I just cut it myself. I'm going for that Motown look (long in the front, short in the back), have had this haircut for over twenty years now. (Along with a multitude of other haircuts, but that's a bedtime story for another night.)

Pro hairstylists usually bitch about having to do this 'do not because it's difficult, but probably because it's rather time consuming. So you know what? I'll just do it myself - I take comfort in the fact that if I screw it up too badly the hair will always grow back. So there. Image

I just love the feeling when I lose 10 pounds of hair! (That's right, in the trash is where it belongs.)Image
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