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The DIY thread

Grab a short black and come join in the non-cycling discussion. Favourite books, movies, holiday destinations, other sports - chat about it all in the cafe.

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Re:

24 Jun 2017 18:53

JayKosta wrote:
If a clothes washing machine starts to smell funky, try using about 1/2 cup of 'Seventh Generation dishwashing machine powder' thru a hot water cycle.

Jay Kosta
Endwell NY USA
I might want to give that a shot next, the washing machine is stinky. (I've tried products like the one from Tide, mostly it just deodorizes for a bit, but it doesn't really clean much of anything.)

Technically I should be taking the washing machine apart so I can get all the lint, dog hair, and whatever else out, but that's a little bit over my head. So I'll try to get as much out as I can without actually disassembling the whole freaking washing machine.

(Still got a kick out of this youtube vid, it's a couple of guys cleaning a washing machine thoroughly. One sounds like he knows what he's doing, the other does not... it's just hilarious to me. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iEmczUzN0q4 )
User avatar Tricycle Rider
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Re: Re:

24 Jun 2017 19:53

Tricycle Rider wrote:
jmdirt wrote: We don't even use gas because we have geothermal heat.

Boise Warm Springs Water District:
http://bwswd.com/about-the-district/
That's awesome you're able to take advantage of geothermal heat. Is it heat only or is there a cooling system as well?

The little I know about geothermal systems it sounds like they would be very expensive to initially install (definitely not a DIY project! :lol:), but over time they're supposed to save huge amounts of $$$.

Its just 130 (ish) degree water flowing into my house from the hot springs. Some people pipe it into radiant floor heat, but since I have a two story house that would be a huge, expensive project (plus some other things that would greatly reduce the efficiency of the radiant heat). I just run the hot water through a heat exchanger that I installed in my forced air furnace. So the hot water flows though the exchanger, and air blows through the exchanger and the warm air goes into my living space.

It was $4,000 to get the water piped to my house (plumbing at the source, pipe, and excavation). The exchanger was $1,400, and the geo-guru I consulted with was $350 (without me doing some of the work he was close to $900). The geo is $325 a year for the orifice size we use. Many of my neighbors drain their geo into a hot tub or some even have dedicated lines to their hot tub (that requires the next size orifice thoogh).
jmdirt
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Re: Re:

24 Jun 2017 22:24

Merckx index wrote:
Tricycle Rider wrote:Why, I never... the impudence! The insolence! The sheer audacity! :razz:


Fortunately, it’s a small crack that I only noticed because I was doing a patching job in the vicinity, and was looking very carefully at the floor. I was more worried that he would scuff the tiles moving the water heater in, and indeed he did, several of them, which I noticed immediately, but fortunately, that doesn’t show much. If I could buy a few more of those tiles, I might replace them, but they come in boxes of 45, and I would have to buy two boxes to get the two different colors I used. The tiles were actually left over from a job I did last year, and I had barely enough; I had a few more left over from that job, but they’re very heavy (one box weighs 63 lb!) and I didn’t bring all of them with me, unfortunately.

But seriously, after so much hard work I would be upset, too. I'm very impressed by your project, how many hundreds (maybe even thousands) of dollars do you think you were able to save by doing everything yourself?


Well, for starters, when I called someone about moving the water heater, they gave me an estimate of $800-$1000, which absolutely stunned me. They said it would be $300 to disconnect it and move it, and another $300 to move it back and reconnect it, and then added there would probably be parts like connectors that had to be replaced. So I had my property manager—the guy who was taking care of the house when I was renting it—help me disconnect and move it. It took us about an hour and a half, but about half of that time was just draining the tank—connect a garden hose to the outlet tap on the tank, and just wait for all the water to come out. When I was done with the floor, I moved the heater back and reconnected it by myself in few minutes, and if not for the water leak, I would have been mostly home free.

The floor repair and tiling I guess would have cost at least $1000, maybe a lot more, because a handy person probably would have wanted to removed the entire subfloor. I tiled a much larger floor last year—a kitchen that was about 180 sq ft, but no subfloor replacement—and a contractor offered to do that for around $500-600, exclusive of the cost of the tiles.

But that was also exclusive of preparing the floor. The floor was originally covered with vinyl sheeting. Though I was able to rip off the sheeting fairly easily, the paper-like underlay remained glued to the floor in many places, and had to be scraped off. That alone took something like twenty curse-heavy hours of work. A pro would certainly have charged for that, though they might have had some easier way of removing it. Supposedly you can use a heat iron to soften the glue, but I had tried something like that on another floor that I did with the same problem, and it didn’t seem to help that much. Maybe an electric sander? Whatever, that would have been at least few more hundred dollars.

I'll just add that because of the difficulty in removing old tile completely and cleanly, I seriously considered just putting the new tile over the old. Unfortunately, that wasn't possible in this case, because the vinyl sheeting went up the walls several inches,and was fastened there. But it's an option if the old tile is confined to just the floor, and I may do that later this summer with a bathroom I plan to re-tile.

jmdirt wrote:Merckx, I used to do all of my projects, partly because I like the challenge, and partly because I like saving money (labor is expensive). But like you said, I'm not as young as I used to be and most of these projects make me hurt. Last year I paid a guy to remodel my bathroom, something I would have never done 10 years ago. While he was working, I was riding! :)


One consolation was that tired as I was, I could still ride. Biking of course allows one to rest the upper body completely, and while my legs were sore, the pedaling motion was therapy for knees that had been bent in one position for so long.

You have some plumbing experience? I have a leak in one of the bathrooms that is next on my to-do list. Part of the problem is the faucet and connector hose, which will have to be replaced, but there’s also a leak inside the wall somewhere; the water damage was obvious even before I opened up the wall to get a look. At this point I think I’ve localized the leak to a large pipe centered behind the sink, but where exactly I don’t know. I’ll probably have to call a plumber.

In '98 I bought a house built in 1930 that needed lots of TLC. Each year I undertook a project, ie: remodel a room, prep/paint the exterior, roof the garage, etc. until the entire house had been remodeled. So both bathrooms and the kitchen required that I learn plumbing. Unfortunately, YouTube didn't exist yet to help me out!

The biggest thing that I have found with older houses is that they all have several generations of plumbing hooked together, and those connections are never very good. But, even some connection between similar era plumbing are a problem because people (even plumbers) don't take care to do the job 100% correct. For example, with any of the plastic type threads, it is important to lube the threads to get sufficient tightness (pipe dope is best but even petrol jelly works). If you put the connection together without lubing the threads it usually works OK at first, but will leak eventually. Fortunately I found this out with exposed connections in an unfinished basement, but if I would have put the wall in, I wouldn't have found out until it was a big issue. If you are opening things up, replace as many connections as you can.

EDIT: plumber's putty is helpful when trying to get unlike connections to be less leaky.
jmdirt
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Re: Re:

26 Jun 2017 14:05

jmdirt wrote:
Tricycle Rider wrote:
jmdirt wrote: We don't even use gas because we have geothermal heat.

Boise Warm Springs Water District:
http://bwswd.com/about-the-district/
That's awesome you're able to take advantage of geothermal heat. Is it heat only or is there a cooling system as well?

The little I know about geothermal systems it sounds like they would be very expensive to initially install (definitely not a DIY project! :lol:), but over time they're supposed to save huge amounts of $$$.

Its just 130 (ish) degree water flowing into my house from the hot springs. Some people pipe it into radiant floor heat, but since I have a two story house that would be a huge, expensive project (plus some other things that would greatly reduce the efficiency of the radiant heat). I just run the hot water through a heat exchanger that I installed in my forced air furnace. So the hot water flows though the exchanger, and air blows through the exchanger and the warm air goes into my living space.

It was $4,000 to get the water piped to my house (plumbing at the source, pipe, and excavation). The exchanger was $1,400, and the geo-guru I consulted with was $350 (without me doing some of the work he was close to $900). The geo is $325 a year for the orifice size we use. Many of my neighbors drain their geo into a hot tub or some even have dedicated lines to their hot tub (that requires the next size orifice thoogh).
Ach sooooo. I thought you were talking about one of those $40,000 investments, like this one. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lY3oGlgZRgI

It's still cool you're able to use the springs in your area, though. :cool:
User avatar Tricycle Rider
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27 Jun 2017 22:50

Need some help with this DIY -

Photobucket has just notified me I'm "hot-linking" my pics from their site (didn't realize I was doing that because I've been with them for at least ten years), they now want $100/yr. so I can post my own photos on this site. I don't even know what this means, but I do know I'm not about to pay them $100.

So, if anyone is dying to see my latest photos of my DIYs - how do I do this without having to pay for it?
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Re:

28 Jun 2017 14:54

Tricycle Rider wrote:Need some help with this DIY -

Photobucket has just notified me I'm "hot-linking" my pics from their site (didn't realize I was doing that because I've been with them for at least ten years), they now want $100/yr. so I can post my own photos on this site. I don't even know what this means, but I do know I'm not about to pay them $100.

So, if anyone is dying to see my latest photos of my DIYs - how do I do this without having to pay for it?


If you just want to post photos in this forum, and on other internet forums, you can use tinypic.com. That's mentioned in the CN thread on how to post photos, and it works fine for me. You upload photos to that site, and they give you an URL for each one to paste in your forum post.
Merckx index
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Re: Re:

28 Jun 2017 20:00

Merckx index wrote:If you just want to post photos in this forum, and on other internet forums, you can use tinypic.com. That's mentioned in the CN thread on how to post photos, and it works fine for me. You upload photos to that site, and they give you an URL for each one to paste in your forum post.
Thanks for the tip, Merckx i, I wasn't sure if the advice in the thread down below was still current. (Photobucket literally alerted me only a couple of days ago that they now charge for their photo hosting, naturally I'm not pleased.)

I'll give tinypic a whirl, thanks again!
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28 Jun 2017 20:14

Yay! Dad's finally out of the ICU (he had a heart attack last Thursday), and the poppies I had planted a while back have blossomed! (Don't know what's going on with the freaking chrysanthemum, but I'll worry about that at some later date.)

Now let's see if I can get this tinypic place to work (cause I know you guys are just dying for some pictures)...

Image

Yay! :razz:
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28 Jun 2017 20:49

Thanks for the update about your father, I'm glad he's out of ICU, and hope he is feeling better.

Jay
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Re:

28 Jun 2017 21:03

JayKosta wrote:Thanks for the update about your father, I'm glad he's out of ICU, and hope he is feeling better.

Jay
I think for dad this was like a bad acid trip (not that I've ever dropped any acid, mind), he never takes any meds at all. After the stent procedure he was basically ready to leave the hospital, they had to heavily sedate him so he wouldn't hurt himself being he had this balloon in his heart and was on some kind of a supplemental heart pump.

Thank you for your well-wishes, Jay, I'm hoping dad will be more diligent about his well-being from now on. I'm sure he'll be on some kind of meds for a while, probably aspirin at the very least.

Thanks again! :)
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Re:

28 Jun 2017 21:29

Tricycle Rider wrote:Yay! Dad's finally out of the ICU (he had a heart attack last Thursday), and the poppies I had planted a while back have blossomed! (Don't know what's going on with the freaking chrysanthemum, but I'll worry about that at some later date.)

Now let's see if I can get this tinypic place to work (cause I know you guys are just dying for some pictures)...

Image

Yay! :razz:

I'm glad he is out of ICU! The reverse role of taking care of aging parents is tough, plus it means that I'm aging! :eek:
jmdirt
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Re: Re:

28 Jun 2017 22:12

jmdirt wrote:I'm glad he is out of ICU! The reverse role of taking care of aging parents is tough, plus it means that I'm aging! :eek:
I think most of us in this thread are getting a bit long in the tooth, but as long as we know how to use duct tape (being the DIY people we are, of course), I think we'll be okay. :)
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07 Jul 2017 21:00

Right, so sometimes a DIY project can go horribly wrong, this one happened because I bought the wrong kind of seed.

I was hoping to grow some ornamental sweet pea because the blooms are simply gorgeous, but silly me, I bought pole pea seed instead. So this meant I now needed a trellis because pole peas need to climb, but seeing as I didn't want to buy one I just constructed one out of anything and everything I could find.

Image


Don't know if I'll get any actual pea crop out of this, but I must say, this homemade trellis is a freaking artistic masterpiece! (From a certain angle it looks especially dramatic. One gust of wind though, eh, I'm still working on stabilizing it.)
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07 Jul 2017 21:29

To support and stabilize the trelis, I'd buy a couple of 6 foot 1X1 inch wooden stakes from a garden supply store. Use a large hammer or a 3lb slegde hammer to pound them into to ground. If a wooden stake don't seem like it will be strong enough, then get a metal pound-in fence post.

Jay Kosta
Endwell NY USA
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Re:

07 Jul 2017 23:28

JayKosta wrote:To support and stabilize the trelis, I'd buy a couple of 6 foot 1X1 inch wooden stakes from a garden supply store. Use a large hammer or a 3lb slegde hammer to pound them into to ground. If a wooden stake don't seem like it will be strong enough, then get a metal pound-in fence post.

Jay Kosta
Endwell NY USA
A sledge hammer? Around living plants? Jay, let's have some perspective here.

Thanks for making me laugh though (even if you didn't mean to), it's been a very rough couple of weeks around here in my area.
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08 Jul 2017 13:00

We have a Wisteria tree/bush that grows quickly and climbs on everything. Using a small sledge to pound in a metal fence post and then roping the trelis to the post is the only way to keep it from falling over due to its weight.

It needs constant pruning and weaving the shoots into the trelis, when it flowers it looks nice - but otherwise it's a pest.

One common thought about pruning Wisteria is to not stop until it's DEAD - not there yet, but someday ...

Then there's the grape vines, and the berry bushes ...
The previous owner of the house must have loved to prune!

Jay Kosta
Endwell NY USA
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Re:

08 Jul 2017 13:42

JayKosta wrote:We have a Wisteria tree/bush that grows quickly and climbs on everything. Using a small sledge to pound in a metal fence post and then roping the trelis to the post is the only way to keep it from falling over due to its weight.

It needs constant pruning and weaving the shoots into the trelis, when it flowers it looks nice - but otherwise it's a pest.

One common thought about pruning Wisteria is to not stop until it's DEAD - not there yet, but someday ...

Then there's the grape vines, and the berry bushes ...
The previous owner of the house must have loved to prune!

Jay Kosta
Endwell NY USA
lol... I think pruning is preferable to weeding, I loathe weeding. Love Wisteria, though, the blossoms are so purrddy and fragrant.

Around here we have blackberry bushes that grow like weed, they never produce any fruit. So what is their whole point of being? (I don't even try to dig them up anymore, I just wack away at them as close to the ground as possible. Feckers will always come back anyway.)

Do your grape vines produce any fruit?
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Re: Re:

08 Jul 2017 15:06

Tricycle Rider wrote:
Do your grape vines produce any fruit?


Any wine-makers here? I have a variety of fruit trees in my backyard, and am currently making some plum wine. It's a great way to use an abundance of fruit that is too much to eat. In the past, at another house, I used to make wine from black raspberries and gooseberries.
Merckx index
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Re: Re:

08 Jul 2017 18:31

[url=http://forum.cyclingnews.com/viewtopic.php?p=2144945#p2144945]Tricycle Rider] wrote:...
Do your grape vines produce any fruit?

-------------------
What little fruit there is, gets eaten by the birds and deer ...

Jay Kosta
Endwell NY USA
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08 Jul 2017 19:43

Nice flowers Tricycle.
As for grapes, well frankly I prefer Bordeaux.
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