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The DIY thread

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Re:

01 Apr 2017 15:24

JayKosta wrote:It looks like all those washers UNDER the cork might prevent the cork from being compressed tightly against the broken fender flange. I'd would just only enough washers under the cork to compensate for the missing section of the fender - so the surface is flat across.

The way I'd do it is sand the fender flange on both sides of the broken section so that epoxy has a good bonding surface. Get a flat metal 'mending plate' about 1 inch wide & 3 inches long with a hole in the center to accept the bolt. Place 1 washer on top of the female threaded clip (to make the surface flat across). The surface needs to be flat across so when you tighten the bolt, the mending plate presses down evenly on both sides and so the plate is not bent into a V shape by the bolt pulling the center section lower than the sides.
Then use JB-Weld epoxy to attach the mending plate on both ends so it spans across the break, and use 1 serrated 'lock washer' under the bolt head.

Jay
I see what you're saying. Here's what I did, and I don't know why this didn't occur to me before (sometimes I'm a bit slow)...

I took a piccy of the other flange (or is it flare? Have to look everything up on the interwebs), the one that is still in one piece. The diameter of the washers is small enough to where the cork presses down on the broken "flange", though. And the reason there are so many washers under the cork is so they mimic the width of the broken part that used to sit under the broken "flange".

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03 Apr 2017 19:39

Have a question for you gardeners out there - are Lily of the Valleys poisonous to wild frogs? (By "wild" frogs I mean ones that are not held in captivity in some kind of a tank, they just kinda roam around in the wild world out there.)

Reason I'm asking is because I have a hanging basket I just re-planted my Lily of the Valleys into, this particular hanging basket tiny little frogs sometimes climb into in the summer because it's the Hilton hotel of all frog hotels. (It has a water receptacle at the bottom, so it serves as kinda like a pool the frogs like to rest in when it gets hot and dry.)

Don't know if frogs actually eat Lily of the Valleys (I know this plant is toxic to other wildlife that does), so that's why I'm asking. :)
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26 Apr 2017 20:19

Back by popular demand in this thread - it's gardening time!

Right, bought some gorgeous tomato plants that were on sale recently (two Early Girls and one cherry tomato)... the tomato bed has been prepped with basic plant soil and some peet moss, and this year I'll try a new fertilizer. So yeah...

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My tomatoes will never be as big, delicious, and succulent looking as krebs', but hey, I'm still trying.
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29 Apr 2017 19:22

A bit inspired, the potatoes went into the ground today.....
Parsley too.
Good luck TR.
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Re:

01 May 2017 19:56

Dazed and Confused wrote:A bit inspired, the potatoes went into the ground today.....
Parsley too.
Good luck TR.
That's awesome, DC, one of these days I'd like to be able to grow my own potatoes as well. What kind of sun do they need? (They're cheap to buy in the store, but there's nothing as rewarding as being able to grow your own food! :))

In the meantime, till I'm able to grown my own potatoes, I've bought these gladiolus bulbs that were on sale - have had very poor results trying to grow them in the local soil (plus added other types of soil) in the past, so will try to grow them in pots instead. It's supposed to be easy... we shall see.

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01 May 2017 22:00

Right, so sometimes a haircut with your latest dog clippers doesn't go quite right - may I demonstrate...

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But that's a'ight, dog, we'll fix it. Once the hair grows back we'll fix it. (Tried them on my own hair today, think I've almost got the hang of them now.)
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02 May 2017 13:24

Get a 'comb' that snaps over the clippers - the largest I've found is 1 inch (25mm).
You'll probably need to go to a specialty 'beauty supply' shop, and take the clippers with you, or at least the make and model number.

Jay
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Re:

03 May 2017 14:54

JayKosta wrote:Get a 'comb' that snaps over the clippers - the largest I've found is 1 inch (25mm).
You'll probably need to go to a specialty 'beauty supply' shop, and take the clippers with you, or at least the make and model number.

Jay
Hi ya, Jay, the clippers did come with several guide combs of various lengths, but I've just always had this moronic inability of operating the clippers correctly.

Ah well, the dog is still a jolly fat little fella, he's completely unaware of how badly his hair looks right now. Thankfully his hair will grow back, but in the meantime...

I have a lawnmower to fix, evidently the self-propeller belt is broken. Have never had to replace it before, so have to do a lot of research on how to do it.
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03 May 2017 19:39

Ta-daa!

Okay, as I mentioned in my prior post I had a lawnmower drive belt to fix, turns out it wasn't broken, it was merely off its tracks. (And thank goodness for that, if I had had to replace it it would have been a much more daunting task seeing as I've never done this before.) Anyhoo, I just had to remove the belt guide and put the belt back in its place - as usual, thank goodness for youtube DIY vids!

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Kinda feel like I should have lubed something while I was in there, just for shits and giggles, but that can wait till next time.

So anyhoo, there's my completed DIY project for today. :)
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03 May 2017 20:07

We had a bad thunderstorm around here on Monday night, and a lot of trees got blown down - luckily we didn't have any trouble.
Anyway, while mowing today there was noise of many chainsaws and I got to thinking of the 2 most important rules when doing serious 'tree work' -
1) Never 'sneek-up' on anyone running a chainsaw, or any other heavy tools. Always approach them from a position and distance where they will see you.
2) Never wrap a rope or chain around any part of your body - wear heavy gloves and hold it tightly, but NEVER wrap.

Jay Kosta
Endwell NY USA
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Re:

03 May 2017 22:53

JayKosta wrote:We had a bad thunderstorm around here on Monday night, and a lot of trees got blown down - luckily we didn't have any trouble.
Anyway, while mowing today there was noise of many chainsaws and I got to thinking of the 2 most important rules when doing serious 'tree work' -
1) Never 'sneek-up' on anyone running a chainsaw, or any other heavy tools. Always approach them from a position and distance where they will see you.
2) Never wrap a rope or chain around any part of your body - wear heavy gloves and hold it tightly, but NEVER wrap.

Jay Kosta
Endwell NY USA
Nope, you most definitely won't want to mess with Ash! (Sorry, first thing that came to mind when you mentioned chainsaws.)

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But seriously, both are very prudent pieces of advice that I hadn't thought of... I have a very restless, busybody neighbor who likes to work with all kinds of heavy machinery on his lawn and backyard, so I'll have to keep your advice in mind the next time he breaks out the chainsaw.

PS - Glad you and yours are okay after that thunderstorm!
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04 May 2017 15:32

You know it's time to replace those cheap lawn sprinkler heads when something like this happens...

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(I like a nice mud beauty mask thingy as much as any gal, but this is most definitely NOT what I had in mind! So off to Home Depot then...)
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17 May 2017 20:45

Don't know how much demand there is for this DIY seeing as I don't know if we have any kayakers amongst us, but here's some freestanding kayak racks you can fashion yourself in case you don't want to pay $70 for those "specialized" racks I found on the interwebs.

Just buy a couple of camping chairs ($10 each), get a hold of some scissors for the fabric you don't need, and a hacksaw (which you hopefully already have in your artillery of tools) for some tubes you won't need.

Ta-daa! (The basic principle and purpose is the same, but I saved $50 on this DIY project.)

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EDIT: Just took another looky, whoa - they actually want almost $130 for a couple of these! https://www.storeyourboard.com/free-standing-kayak-storage-portable-kayak-rack/
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