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Re:

24 Jun 2018 13:34

Tricycle Rider wrote:... I just stuck a couple of pencils in them and secured them with duct tape, ...

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just be real careful to not bump the TV or it might tip over. Especially if there is a need to reach or even move around near the TV.

Jay
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Re: Re:

24 Jun 2018 15:01

JayKosta wrote:
Tricycle Rider wrote:... I just stuck a couple of pencils in them and secured them with duct tape, ...

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just be real careful to not bump the TV or it might tip over. Especially if there is a need to reach or even move around near the TV.

Jay
Indeed - the TV is standing on a whole pyramid of fat books, which is a precarious situation in itself. But the way the pencils are stuck in and the piece of wood (same one I used on the broken recliner :lol: ) they are propped on makes the whole creation pretty stable. It's all about weight and counterweight, and being the TV is in a corner against the wall I have minimal physical contact with it.

I would have re-used the mount from the busted big flat-screen TV, but unfortunately it wouldn't work with the smaller one. So, in the interest of reaching ultimate cheapness you just do the best you can with what's at hand.

I am still mesmerized by this HDMI cable switch I had bought, btw., it'll make my TV viewing so much more pleasant.
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Re:

24 Jun 2018 15:18

python wrote:just s side note for all diy-selfer...

i found that 'ask amazon' was an invaluable resource in many my diy projects. the knowledge base of millions of customers combined with the amazon system of notifications and keeping everyone merit-based is truly amazing. i quite frequently shop there and apart from a natural question of how a prospective item might fit or measure, i as often ask the questions of a technical nature...

for instance, i am building now an electric scooter for my nephew and to put the thing right one needs to properly fit and size several electrical and mechanical components. having zero experience, i simply asked if a particular battery will work with a particular motor. 2 answers arrived within 1h: one from a vendor and 1 from a customer.

saved myself a tonne of time researching and possibly having my sister's kid an accident.
I love Amazon, particularly the customer questions and answers section. Amazon is where I had bought my HDMI cable switcher recently, had to find out what it was and if it would work with my TV to begin with. (Can't complain about the price either, Walmart's cheapest one was $24, at Amazon a similar one was only $10.)

Your scooter project sounds awesome, you'll have to take a picture of it once it's completed.
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Re: Re:

24 Jun 2018 21:00

Tricycle Rider wrote:
python wrote:just s side note for all diy-selfer...

i found that 'ask amazon' was an invaluable resource in many my diy projects. the knowledge base of millions of customers combined with the amazon system of notifications and keeping everyone merit-based is truly amazing. i quite frequently shop there and apart from a natural question of how a prospective item might fit or measure, i as often ask the questions of a technical nature...

for instance, i am building now an electric scooter for my nephew and to put the thing right one needs to properly fit and size several electrical and mechanical components. having zero experience, i simply asked if a particular battery will work with a particular motor. 2 answers arrived within 1h: one from a vendor and 1 from a customer.

saved myself a tonne of time researching and possibly having my sister's kid an accident.
I love Amazon, particularly the customer questions and answers section. Amazon is where I had bought my HDMI cable switcher recently, had to find out what it was and if it would work with my TV to begin with. (Can't complain about the price either, Walmart's cheapest one was $24, at Amazon a similar one was only $10.)

Your scooter project sounds awesome, you'll have to take a picture of it once it's completed.
thanks, tricycle ! :) indeed, the amazon business model is amazing in more ways than just selling stuff. i was turned around from being a real skeptic.

anyways, i engaged into the project b/c the kid for his 14 is already almost 190 cm and he wants more umf and range, than a stock scooter would typically offer. also, i felt that due to his size and youth, he needed more safety features built in from the getgo. it's an interesting project, b/c unlike the multitude of readily available packages for electro bikes (that is, making almost ANY bike electric), there is little for converting scooters.

though i hate taking pictures, i will try to post something once done.
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27 Jun 2018 12:44

Update on my "big" 32" flat-screen TV non-repair...

Okay, I couldn't just let it go and part with the TV, had to take it apart and see if there was anything simple I could fix myself. It was not to be, after consulting some DIY vids I realized the problem is probably the LED strip lights themselves (had sound but no picture), which are a complete bitch to get to. Not only that but I'd have to buy some tools and the strips themselves, ultimately it would have just been more cost-effective to buy a whole new TV. (I certainly wasn't about to have a pro fix it for something like $150 + parts, the TV is just too obsolete for that.)

Still, it was kinda interesting to open it up and see what's inside an LED TV, apparently the screen itself is the most expensive part. That's at least one thing that's still in perfect condition.

Anyhoo, naturally I won't just toss the TV into the garbage (think that's even illegal nowadays in my area), I'll just donate it to the Goodwill electronics recycling place where they can hopefully salvage a few parts.

Image

It's amazing how quickly electronics become obsolete these days, this TV was only 4 or 5 years old.
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27 Jun 2018 15:10

I love this thread!
A couple of gardening thoughts: coffee grounds can be useful for adjusting soil pH. I had a red worm compost for many year when my wife grew heirloom tomatoes for the Boise City Market, and it was great. For small scale though, oh sh*t looks like a great way to go.

I thought that I was the only one with a TV smaller than 90" (mine is 36")! :lol:
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Re:

29 Jun 2018 14:02

jmdirt wrote:I love this thread!
A couple of gardening thoughts: coffee grounds can be useful for adjusting soil pH. I had a red worm compost for many year when my wife grew heirloom tomatoes for the Boise City Market, and it was great. For small scale though, oh sh*t looks like a great way to go.

I thought that I was the only one with a TV smaller than 90" (mine is 36")! :lol:
Ha! Remember when big flat-screens cost thousands of dollars years ago that only the rich could afford? Times have changed...

I've downgraded to a glorious 22" that I had laying around, took a couple of days to adjust to the smaller size. But it's still a good TV, so I won't be buying a new one just yet.

Good tip about the coffee grounds to raise soil acidity, btw., your wife's tomatoes sound delicious!
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03 Jul 2018 20:32

So here's my latest DIY, replacing a light bulb socket. I've never made any secret of it, electrical stuff just scares the holy crap out me! Still, and here's the exciting part of the story...

My ceiling light's bulb was going on and off, finally decided to dismember the light (after the turning the electricity off, naturally!) and take a closer looky at it. Upon doing that I realized not only was the bulb itself flickering, there were also some sparks flying around. What I found was this. Image

Of course I went to Home Depot with the old part and found a new matching one, it was time to replace it. Never knew sockets could be fried like that.

The ceiling light is working just fine now, but like anything electrical please just hire a pro instead of DIY-ing it if you don't know what you're doing.
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03 Jul 2018 22:28

The damage to the insulation on the old socket might have been caused by using a too high wattage bulb. Usually the fixture has a tag that says what is the maximum wattage - more than that and the fixture gets too hot. If an incandescent (old style) is replaced with compact flouerescent or an LED bulb, then the important number is how many ACTUAL watts the bulb uses, NOT how it compares to an incandescent. A bright CFL or LED would usually be fine in a fixture designed for incandescent or halogen - because incandescent and halogen use a lot of watts and burn HOT.

With a bulb socket, the important concern about 'what wire goes where' is that the BLACK wire should go to the little button on the bottom of the socket (so it is not easy to accidentally touch) and the other wire (red or some other non-white / non-green color) should go to the outer part of the socket. The use of polarized plugs makes this more dependable when done correctly, because they can only be put in the receptable one way - the narrow blade is 'hot' and should go to the black wire. I think the neutral blade is made wider so it cannot be accidentally pushed into the narrow 'hot' side of a receptacle - even if the narrow blade of the plug has been bent or removed.

A good illustration is here - https://www.familyhandyman.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/06/FH00NOV_WRARIG_01-2.jpg
It shows how the electrical POLARITY is identified and used in plugs, sockets, and wires. Note the ribbing on one side of the wire insulation that indicates that it is for the neutral connection.

Jay
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Re:

03 Jul 2018 23:25

JayKosta wrote:POLARITY

Jay
I just had to larf at this part, and here's why...

While installing the new socket I says to myself - old girl, if you reverse the polarities on this there will be some serious fireworks going on. And just in time for the 4th of July!

But seriously, I think the prior bulb I may have installed into that old and fried socket may have been too hot. So the new socket and new bulb will be running much cooler.

As usual, chapeau for your tips, Jay. :cool:
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04 Jul 2018 14:03

Aaaand, here's another DIY just in time for the 4th of July holiday - washer wouldn't turn into the spin cycle.

I was watching all kinds of youtube vids on how to fix it, turning the washer upside down or taking it apart was not an option. It turned out to be something really simple - the door latch thingy was broken and wouldn't depress correctly, so the washer wouldn't drain and go into the spin cycle.

I'm sure there are all kinds of fixes for this pending on the washer model, dude whose vid I watched used a cable tie. That fix would not have worked on my door thingy, so I just ended up using a wine cork. (The rubbery kind, not like a real cork cork.)

The washer once again works, so, yay!
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04 Jul 2018 16:43

Trike there is a section..a bank of metal drawers at Home Depot and Lowes in the hardware section that has a few rubber plugs.. also at many appliance repair part places they can help you with the model number of the broken appliance or you show them the old part...I got a door latch lock for @$6.75 instead of a new microwave
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Re:

05 Jul 2018 13:09

Unchained wrote:Trike there is a section..a bank of metal drawers at Home Depot and Lowes in the hardware section that has a few rubber plugs.. also at many appliance repair part places they can help you with the model number of the broken appliance or you show them the old part...I got a door latch lock for @$6.75 instead of a new microwave
Ach soooooo, I didn't know they had replacement parts at the local appliance repair stores, thought I'd have to order them specifically from the manufacturer. (My washer happens to be a Sears Kenmore, Sears is going under, so not sure Kenmores will even be around anymore. Eeeeek!)

A neighbor of mine I used to house-sit for had the same problem with his ancient washer, he just used a coin to depress the door thingy. I suppose the lock is meant to be a child safety feature, do kids really climb into washers in the middle of a wash cycle?

Anyhoo, thanks for the tip, and good job fixing your microwave!
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05 Jul 2018 13:58

The 'part bins' at HD / Lowes / good hardware stores don't usually have specific parts for appliances, but do have a good selection of small parts 'that I did not know existed'. And especially the small connectors used to assemble/repair knockdown furniture, small lamp parts, nylon screws, spacers, etc.

My latest DIY was replacing the light switch from our range hood - the hood (Broan) was old and the tag with model number gone, and the online pictures of parts were not detailed enough to verify they would work. So I just used a simple toggle switch from electronics store - it's not as pretty, but Louise is happy that it now turns on/off dependably.

Also installed a Racor Ladder lift in the garage to get my extension ladder out of the way. Tho not a DIY gizmo rigging of pulleys, the Racor was reasonably priced and 'built for the task' - I bought it online from HD.

Also installed a set of big wheels on the rear of a small rotary lawnmower so it would roll easier over a rough inclined section of a drainage swale that needs to be cut to 'beat back the jungle'.

And parts for Kenmore / Sears appliances will continue to be available - the appliances are made by major mfg such as Whirlpool, etc.

Jay
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Re:

05 Jul 2018 14:34

JayKosta wrote:The 'part bins' at HD / Lowes / good hardware stores don't usually have specific parts for appliances, but do have a good selection of small parts 'that I did not know existed'. And especially the small connectors used to assemble/repair knockdown furniture, small lamp parts, nylon screws, spacers, etc.

My latest DIY was replacing the light switch from our range hood - the hood (Broan) was old and the tag with model number gone, and the online pictures of parts were not detailed enough to verify they would work. So I just used a simple toggle switch from electronics store - it's not as pretty, but Louise is happy that it now turns on/off dependably.

Also installed a Racor Ladder lift in the garage to get my extension ladder out of the way. Tho not a DIY gizmo rigging of pulleys, the Racor was reasonably priced and 'built for the task' - I bought it online from HD.

Also installed a set of big wheels on the rear of a small rotary lawnmower so it would roll easier over a rough inclined section of a drainage swale that needs to be cut to 'beat back the jungle'.

And parts for Kenmore / Sears appliances will continue to be available - the appliances are made by major mfg such as Whirlpool, etc.

Jay
Great job with all of your DIYs, I'm sure Louise is happy to have a handy man like you around! And as usual you're a fountain of knowledge, I didn't know Kenmores were part of a bigger manufacturing company and that parts would still be available. On that note...

Now that I'm not panicking I checked, the name of my busted part is "washer lid switch actuator". The replacement part would cost something like $13 and would be a pain to install, do I really want to spend that much on a part when a wine cork works just fine? Naaaaaah, I'm too cheap for that and there's no danger I'd have a kid or pet climbing into the washer during the spin cycle. So wine cork it is.
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05 Jul 2018 14:49

Those ladder lifts are also sometimes marketed as bike lifts. Does it work well?

EDIT:
If you got his one:

https://www.homedepot.com/p/Racor-150-lb-Ladder-Lift-LDL-1B/203414655

it is different than the ones marketed as ladder/bike lifts:

https://www.homedepot.com/p/Racor-1-Bike-Ceiling-Mount-Bike-Lift-PBH-1R/100464777?MERCH=REC-_-PIPHorizontal2_rr-_-203414655-_-100464777-_-N

A neighbor of mine told me the best way to store a ladder is to not own one...storage solved, risk gone. :D
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05 Jul 2018 15:18

The Home Depot and Lowes bins only have rubber plugs!!!my bad.

I have had exceptional luck at the parts stores including getting a new handle knob for the self cleaning oven latch for my super old stove.. these places often sell BBQ parts also...I got a replacement element for my Ducane grill same day from the local guy..got the satisfaction of fixing it and.. cheaper than Amazon and Ducane themselves (?)
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Re:

05 Jul 2018 16:17

jmdirt wrote:... A neighbor of mine told me the best way to store a ladder is to not own one...storage solved, risk gone. :D

-----------------------------------
'When a man needs a ladder, he needs it badly'.

I also have an adjustable leg for the extension ladder that makes it work on uneven surfaces.

The Racor unit I have is the one for a ladder, not suitable for bikes. The quality of the Racor product is good, and I'm pleased with it. With any similar bike / ladder lift device, you must consider how it will be firmly attached to the structural wooden wall studs or ceiling joists - and with strong screws probably going through wallboard / plaster / etc. A 'free standing' bike rack would be easier, but would probably use more floor space.

Jay
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Re:

05 Jul 2018 20:14

Unchained wrote:The Home Depot and Lowes bins only have rubber plugs!!!my bad.
No worries, UC, the rubber wine corks I use (I'm partial to the Barefoot wines myself) could potentially work as a plug just as well in case of a dire emergency!

The many DIY stories I could tell using these corks...
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05 Jul 2018 20:29

And the plastic champagne bottle 'mushroom' corks make excellent 'bumpers' to put on the end of rods to cover the sharp edge.
I also seem to have a "can't throw away" problem with large plastic coffee cans - they are just the right size to store stuff - their only drawback is that they aren't transparent. E.g, 2 quart bottles of motor oil fit snugly in a Folgers can, along with a few paper towels, and it doesn't tip over riding on the floor of the rear seat.

Jay
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