Log in:  

Register

The DIY thread

Grab a short black and come join in the non-cycling discussion. Favourite books, movies, holiday destinations, other sports - chat about it all in the cafe.

Moderators: Eshnar, Irondan, King Boonen, Red Rick, Pricey_sky

16 Jul 2018 12:45

Okay, now that my phone wire issue has been successfully tackled it's back to the ladder thing...

Only just now did I find out it was my brother and dad who had cut the ladder's legs to length, that may explain a few things. Not only are the legs uneven, one is already beginning to split because the weight on the legs is uneven. I just put some duct tape and some cable ties around it, hopefully it'll last a few more years. Here's a piccy...

Image

The garage floor is probably very uneven as well, not to mention it's very slippery. So I'm trying to fashion something out of door stops, bought both the regular kind as well as the "Oatmeal Jammer" jmdirt had mentioned. I kinda have an idea stewing in my brain, will naturally keep you all posted.

And to answer Unchained's earlier question about climbing up to the attic so often - the attic is where I hide the dead bodies. I mean, doesn't everybody?

Just KIDDING! :lol: :o
User avatar Tricycle Rider
Senior Member
 
Posts: 2,054
Joined: 09 Feb 2013 11:12

17 Jul 2018 12:34

For the leg that is splitting, I'd get a metal screw-drive hose clamp of suitable size - they are quite strong. And position the screw mechanism so it won't be in the way. After tightening the clamp, wrap it with duct tape to prevent snags.
For the uneven leg, I'd cut pieces from a wood paint stir paddle and staple & glue them to the bottom.

Jay
JayKosta
Member
 
Posts: 831
Joined: 25 Nov 2010 13:55

17 Jul 2018 18:02

jmdirt
Senior Member
 
Posts: 3,134
Joined: 06 Dec 2013 17:33

Re:

17 Jul 2018 23:28

Tricycle Rider wrote:
And to answer Unchained's earlier question about climbing up to the attic so often - the attic is where I hide the dead bodies. I mean, doesn't everybody?


Not a good idea to store dead bodies up above, because as they decompose, icky liquid starts oozing out, and leaking through the floor. That's what ultimately did in Ira Einhorn.

But maybe someone here has a fix for that. How do you stop leaking dead bodies from dripping to lower floors? It's gonna take more than duct tape, and don't even talk to me about clamps.

But burying dead bodies remains the way to go.Just don't do it out in the woods somewhere! So many murderers make that mistake--like that guy who killed Bibi Lee. A shallow grave is eventually discovered, if not by humans then by animals. Bury the body in your backyard, then cover the site with a cement patio. Or at least plant a tree or something to obscure the area. I mean, come on, if you're going to all the trouble of killing someone, shouldn't you spend a little time and energy on proper disposal?
Last edited by Merckx index on 17 Jul 2018 23:51, edited 2 times in total.
Merckx index
Senior Member
 
Posts: 3,758
Joined: 27 Jul 2010 19:19

Re: Re:

17 Jul 2018 23:49

Merckx index wrote:
Tricycle Rider wrote:
And to answer Unchained's earlier question about climbing up to the attic so often - the attic is where I hide the dead bodies. I mean, doesn't everybody?


Not a good idea to store dead bodies up above, because as they decompose, icky liquid starts oozing out, and leaking through the floor. That's what ultimately did in Ira Einhorn.

But maybe someone here has a fix for that. How do you stop leaking dead bodies from dripping to lower floors? It's gonna take more than duct tape, and don't even talk to me about clamps.

But burying dead bodies remains the way to go.Just don't do it out in the woods somewhere! So many murderers make that mistake--like that guy who killed Bibi Lee. A shallow grave is eventually discovered, if not by humans than by animals. Bury the body in your backyard, then cover the site with a cement patio. Or at least plant a tree or something to obscure the area. I mean, come on, if you're going to all trouble of killing someone, shouldn't you spend a little time and energy on proper disposal?

Wasn't there a guy who killed his wife, buried her in the back yard and then put a headstone on it? I mean who's going to look in a grave for a dead person?
jmdirt
Senior Member
 
Posts: 3,134
Joined: 06 Dec 2013 17:33

Re:

18 Jul 2018 14:50

JayKosta wrote:For the leg that is splitting, I'd get a metal screw-drive hose clamp of suitable size - they are quite strong. And position the screw mechanism so it won't be in the way. After tightening the clamp, wrap it with duct tape to prevent snags. Jay
That's an excellent fix, Jay, I didn't think of that. Off to Home Depot I go again...

Ha-ha! I just knew it was going to be something from Christmas Vacation, though I was thinking of the scene where Griswold falls off the ladder while hanging xmas lights on his house. (I think of that each time I'm hanging xmas lights, it brings a smile to my face and takes the nervous edge off.)


As to the DIY body disposal... he's brought up some excellent points, like with everything MI thinks things carefully through. I wouldn't expect any less from him.
User avatar Tricycle Rider
Senior Member
 
Posts: 2,054
Joined: 09 Feb 2013 11:12

18 Jul 2018 23:35

Last edited by jmdirt on 19 Jul 2018 20:37, edited 1 time in total.
jmdirt
Senior Member
 
Posts: 3,134
Joined: 06 Dec 2013 17:33

19 Jul 2018 10:05

:) not sure, but this post may be the 1st one about a cycling diy project on a cycling forum :)

will be as brief as possible...as many cyclists with more than 1 bike, i have an odd number of various length and gauge spokes lying around. they are unused spares for the various size wheels we used over the years -from a standard 14G 310mm to the kids 14 inch wheels when they were little.

long story short. w/o going into the specifics, and i am sure i was NOT the 1st attempting it, a thought attended me that I could re-use some of those LONG spares on SMALLER wheels (saving on buying the right size spokes) IF i could extend the threads on the LONG 14G spares and then trimming the excess length.

as most diy-selfers i have a good collection of taps and dies, including the minis like M2, M2.5 etc. I knew the 14G spoke= 2mm diameter and therefore an M2 should work. It took seconds to discover that it WONT.

Puzzled, I resorted to my Google friend to discover that the spoke threads are rolled, not tapped and that i need a special machine to do it.

Not only I learned about the differences btwn the rolled and tapped threads, but due to the fact that i enjoy fiddling with the wheels I decided to buy the machine. luckily it was affordable imo. thus a learning experience may now convert into savings on wheels for me, my folks and my friends...

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B001PT6R4I/?coliid=I39JPJJLAON6MN&colid=9C3HZYD81QOL&psc=0&ref_=lv_ov_lig_dp_it
DJPbaltimore:'John Kerry is an honorable person and would not call out the Russians if there was not evidence', 'the 2 of you are russia stooges'
in foreign policy there are no eternal friendships or eternal enemies, only eternal interests
User avatar python
Veteran
 
Posts: 6,854
Joined: 25 Sep 2009 01:01

19 Jul 2018 13:02

Was the trouble with the spoke threads the 'threads per mm' or something special about them being rolled versus cut?
Most small sized threads are rolled because it is much less expensive, but their size and thread count is typically the same as used in threading dies. Is there a 'correct size' threading die available for spoke threads?

Jay
JayKosta
Member
 
Posts: 831
Joined: 25 Nov 2010 13:55

20 Jul 2018 10:21

the regular spoke of 14G is 2 mm in diameter. when i attempted to see if the M2 die would naturally thread into the the nipple spoke side, it simply would not fit w/o destroying the thread. i then took my caliper and measured the spoke thread (outside) diameter and the spoke shaft diameter. it turns out the outside thread diameter was 2.2 mm.
which was the direct reason an M2 die does not fit. Besides, as i found out from reading further, the pitch of the 14g spoke thread is different from a standard M2 pitch.

a standard 14G bike spoke thread is designated as 2.2 mm x 56 TPI. yep, it's a weird nomenclature mixing metric and english systems, but that's the way it is. the reason the thread outside diameter is bigger than the spoke shaft is b/c during rolling some material is 'squeezed' out. there is no die as far as i could find out...

if you take a look at a link in my previous post, you will see the rolling head, not a die.
DJPbaltimore:'John Kerry is an honorable person and would not call out the Russians if there was not evidence', 'the 2 of you are russia stooges'
in foreign policy there are no eternal friendships or eternal enemies, only eternal interests
User avatar python
Veteran
 
Posts: 6,854
Joined: 25 Sep 2009 01:01

Re:

20 Jul 2018 23:53

python wrote::) not sure, but this post may be the 1st one about a cycling diy project on a cycling forum :)

Don't think any of us mind whatever your latest DIY may be, however, the description of the Cafe goes as, and I will quote:

Grab a short black and come join in the non-cycling discussion. Favourite books, movies, holiday destinations, other sports - chat about it all in the cafe.

I'm trying to stick to that, so my latest non-cycling related DIY may be how to grow some radishes. (My latest try was a complete disaster... crikes, even 5-year olds know how to grow radishes. I'm just not ready to talk about this latest fail of mine yet.)
User avatar Tricycle Rider
Senior Member
 
Posts: 2,054
Joined: 09 Feb 2013 11:12

Re: Re:

21 Jul 2018 06:42

Tricycle Rider wrote:
python wrote::) not sure, but this post may be the 1st one about a cycling diy project on a cycling forum :)

Don't think any of us mind whatever your latest DIY may be, however, the description of the Cafe goes as, and I will quote:

Grab a short black and come join in the non-cycling discussion. Favourite books, movies, holiday destinations, other sports - chat about it all in the cafe.

I'm trying to stick to that, so my latest non-cycling related DIY may be how to grow some radishes. (My latest try was a complete disaster... crikes, even 5-year olds know how to grow radishes. I'm just not ready to talk about this latest fail of mine yet.)
tricycle, with so many smileys, you knew i was NOT serious , didn' you :)
DJPbaltimore:'John Kerry is an honorable person and would not call out the Russians if there was not evidence', 'the 2 of you are russia stooges'
in foreign policy there are no eternal friendships or eternal enemies, only eternal interests
User avatar python
Veteran
 
Posts: 6,854
Joined: 25 Sep 2009 01:01

21 Jul 2018 11:48

Okay, now that python and I have established that we absolutely do not understand each other's sense of humor I need some help with this DIY...

Found a yellow jacket nest (it actually appears to be underground), how do I get rid of it in the most non-toxic way? Reason I'm asking about non-toxic is because I don't want to kill the surrounding plants...

Image

So far I've poured about a gallon of boiling water down the yellow jacket tunnel, but I've also read you can add mint oil to the boiling water. Being I don't have any mint oil on hand - would a breath mint do? Like an Altoid or something? Some minty herbal tea?

Inquiring minds want to know!

Btw., I feel like a bit of an ******* running around with a boiling kettle of water in the dark, but this is apparently the only time the yellow jackets seem to be inactive.
User avatar Tricycle Rider
Senior Member
 
Posts: 2,054
Joined: 09 Feb 2013 11:12

21 Jul 2018 14:05

mothballs - drop them in the tunnel when there aren't any flying around.

Jay
JayKosta
Member
 
Posts: 831
Joined: 25 Nov 2010 13:55

21 Jul 2018 14:06

Just fill the entrance to the hole with dirt now. I think that putting dish soap in the hole just before the boiling water also helps.
jmdirt
Senior Member
 
Posts: 3,134
Joined: 06 Dec 2013 17:33

Re:

22 Jul 2018 13:08

JayKosta wrote:mothballs - drop them in the tunnel when there aren't any flying around.

Jay
That's an interesting fix, haven't heard of that before. Of course, I've never tried to non-toxically get rid of yellow jackets, I've always loved to just zapp them with Raid spray.

Have you ever tried that Sevin bug powder dust I'm reading about on the interwebs? I'm thinking of giving that a try...

jmdirt wrote:Just fill the entrance to the hole with dirt now. I think that putting dish soap in the hole just before the boiling water also helps.
I plugged the hole up with a plastic cap, had a whole bunch of pissed off yellow jackets buzzing around yesterday trying to get back into the nest. Will they eventually get the idea that their nest is (hopefully) no longer there and go somewhere else? The suspense is just killing me!



On a completely different note - the torsion spring from the garage door snapped yesterday, I know replacing it is something some people can do themselves. But being this is a 150-pound door that could come crashing down on a car, person, or dog if I screw it up I will just have to bite the bullet and hire a pro. It's killing me not being able to do this DIY myself, but things could go horribly wrong if I don't do it right.
User avatar Tricycle Rider
Senior Member
 
Posts: 2,054
Joined: 09 Feb 2013 11:12

Re: Re:

22 Jul 2018 15:27

Tricycle Rider wrote:
JayKosta wrote:mothballs - drop them in the tunnel when there aren't any flying around.

Jay
That's an interesting fix, haven't heard of that before. Of course, I've never tried to non-toxically get rid of yellow jackets, I've always loved to just zapp them with Raid spray.

Have you ever tried that Sevin bug powder dust I'm reading about on the interwebs? I'm thinking of giving that a try...

jmdirt wrote:Just fill the entrance to the hole with dirt now. I think that putting dish soap in the hole just before the boiling water also helps.
I plugged the hole up with a plastic cap, had a whole bunch of pissed off yellow jackets buzzing around yesterday trying to get back into the nest. Will they eventually get the idea that their nest is (hopefully) no longer there and go somewhere else? The suspense is just killing me!



On a completely different note - the torsion spring from the garage door snapped yesterday, I know replacing it is something some people can do themselves. But being this is a 150-pound door that could come crashing down on a car, person, or dog if I screw it up I will just have to bite the bullet and hire a pro. It's killing me not being able to do this DIY myself, but things could go horribly wrong if I don't do it right.

They will move on pretty quickly. I had a jacket hive under the eve of my garage so I knocked it down with a long pole. About half of the workers hung around (literally) for a few days and now they're gone. You could remove the cap, let them go in, and then put the cap back again. That seems like a recipe for stinging though if you aren't really careful.

I think that you can do the garage door yourself. I helped a guy do his and it wasn't bad at all. He was able to just replace the broken side with a spring that he got at the used building store (it had the same ratings). You can get the winding bars for ~$15.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5k9qrgZ9rPs
jmdirt
Senior Member
 
Posts: 3,134
Joined: 06 Dec 2013 17:33

Re: Re:

22 Jul 2018 16:09

jmdirt wrote:They will move on pretty quickly. I had a jacket hive under the eve of my garage so I knocked it down with a long pole. About half of the workers hung around (literally) for a few days and now they're gone. You could remove the cap, let them go in, and then put the cap back again. That seems like a recipe for stinging though if you aren't really careful.

I think that you can do the garage door yourself. I helped a guy do his and it wasn't bad at all. He was able to just replace the broken side with a spring that he got at the used building store (it had the same ratings). You can get the winding bars for ~$15.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5k9qrgZ9rPs
Few things make me smile as much as killing a bunch of yellow jackets, their stings are just so painful. At least I have enough sense to stay away from them, not sure the dog does, though.

I opened the tunnel back up and gave it a good dusting of that Sevin bug killing dust this morning, hopefully this will do the job. Will keep you posted.

Thank you for the vid about the garage door spring, you guys make it sound so easy. I'm just so nervous about doing this DIY though... I'll get a free quote from a pro tomorrow, if it's just too ridiculous (something like $300-$500) I may just try to do it myself.
Last edited by Tricycle Rider on 22 Jul 2018 16:13, edited 1 time in total.
User avatar Tricycle Rider
Senior Member
 
Posts: 2,054
Joined: 09 Feb 2013 11:12

22 Jul 2018 16:11

If the spring is at the front of the garage and goes across from side to side, those can be dangerous because you have to 'wind the spring' to apply the initial tension. Hiring a pro would be wise unless you feel that you are very mechanically inclined and have the needed tools and physical atrength.
The extension springs that are on the rear of the rails are not difficult to replace, but you do need to lift the door into the UP position and lock it there with a sturdy prop.

BTW - I had a friend who was almost KILLED replacing a spring - it broke loose under tension and hit him in the head. They need to be treated with respect and caution.

Jay
JayKosta
Member
 
Posts: 831
Joined: 25 Nov 2010 13:55

Re:

22 Jul 2018 16:28

JayKosta wrote:If the spring is at the front of the garage and goes across from side to side, those can be dangerous because you have to 'wind the spring' to apply the initial tension. Hiring a pro would be wise unless you feel that you are very mechanically inclined and have the needed tools and physical atrength.
The extension springs that are on the rear of the rails are not difficult to replace, but you do need to lift the door into the UP position and lock it there with a sturdy prop.

BTW - I had a friend who was almost KILLED replacing a spring - it broke loose under tension and hit him in the head. They need to be treated with respect and caution.

Jay
It is a side to side spring, and I am so tempted, and I thank you for the words of wisdom. I don't mind messing around with some yellow jackets, but a DIY that could potentially severely hurt (or even kill) a person or dog is just a DIY I'm not willing to do.

Given that I'll naturally be looking for the most price-efficient pro, will let you know how that goes.
User avatar Tricycle Rider
Senior Member
 
Posts: 2,054
Joined: 09 Feb 2013 11:12

PreviousNext

Return to General

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 5 guests

Back to top