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22 Jul 2018 17:16

Trike please note that those springs.. both types are under lots of tension.. everything is different but my retention nut has 3 Allen key screws holding it in position on the shaft after the pre-load.. if you start to loosen anything you may be in for an unpleasant surprise when the retention device is loose enough to spin on the shaft.. the spring that picks up the garage door..(aluminum, wood..? anyway heavy) now the only resistance for the spring is the Allen wrench held by your hand flesh!!! Caution!!!
Unchained
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Re:

22 Jul 2018 17:25

Unchained wrote:Trike please note that those springs.. both types are under lots of tension.. everything is different but my retention nut has 3 Allen key screws holding it in position on the shaft after the pre-load.. if you start to loosen anything you may be in for an unpleasant surprise when the retention device is loose enough to spin on the shaft.. the spring that picks up the garage door..(aluminum, wood..? anyway heavy) now the only resistance for the spring is the Allen wrench held by your hand flesh!!! Caution!!!
Thank you, Unchained, you guys have sufficiently talked me out of doing it myself.

Mechanically I could probably do it, but there's just too much at stake if I **** it up.

Will hire a pro, promise. :)
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22 Jul 2018 20:52

Okay, here's the latest update on the garage door spring DIY (cause you guys just know I couldn't let it go)...

I realize I won't be able to set the new spring correctly myself, but the least I could do was take the thing apart and take the old spring off.

First thing, of course, was disconnect any power to the garage opener, and then I just went to town with a whole bunch of tools. (Some of them may have been metric, some the "other" system.) The garage door was already fully down, so there was no danger of anyone getting hurt if it suddenly came crashing down.Image

Either way I took it apart and now just need a pro to replace and install the new spring, giving him/her a head-start should hopefully save me a few bucks.
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23 Jul 2018 00:31

Good work so far!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2udM-E2kxNA&t=257s

EDIT: she has two 'pros' with her, but she's doing the work.
jmdirt
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Re:

23 Jul 2018 12:55

jmdirt wrote:Good work so far!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2udM-E2kxNA&t=257s

EDIT: she has two 'pros' with her, but she's doing the work.
Thanks, jmd, that's a cool vid!

My garage door has only one spring on the left, so far I've learned that it's a right wind, and the numbers on it say 26.75 and 275. I'm assuming the 26.75 is the length in inches, the diameter appears to be about 2". Not sure about the wire size, and what does the 275 number mean?

(I'm still not going to install a new spring myself because the old one is actually pretty heavy, but it's always interesting to learn new stuff.)

In the meantime I went back to playing with the yellow jackets early this morning...

After the Sevin dusting there was still quite a bit of activity yesterday, this morning I gave the tunnel more dusting and plugged it back up with a cap from an aerosol can. I filled the cap with more powder, can't wait to see what happens today! (If I see no progress by tomorrow I will just napalm the little **** with Raid, I have only so much patience. Or maybe I'll try the mothballs like Jay had suggested, because, why not?)

Image
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Re: Re:

23 Jul 2018 13:06

Tricycle Rider wrote:
jmdirt wrote:Good work so far!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2udM-E2kxNA&t=257s

EDIT: she has two 'pros' with her, but she's doing the work.
Thanks, jmd, that's a cool vid!

My garage door has only one spring on the left, so far I've learned that it's a right wind, and the numbers on it say 26.75 and 275. I'm assuming the 26.75 is the length in inches, the diameter appears to be about 2". Not sure about the wire size, and what does the 275 number mean?

(I'm still not going to install a new spring myself because the old one is actually pretty heavy, but it's always interesting to learn new stuff.)

In the meantime I went back to playing with the yellow jackets early this morning...

After the Sevin dusting there was still quite a bit of activity yesterday, this morning I gave the tunnel more dusting and plugged it back up with a cap from an aerosol can. I filled the cap with more powder, can't wait to see what happens today! (If I see no progress by tomorrow I will just napalm the little **** with Raid, I have only so much patience. Or maybe I'll try the mothballs like Jay had suggested, because, why not?)

Image

https://www.industrialspring.com/resources/measure-order-torsion-springs
If you have a pro do the work they will do all that for you though.
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Re: Re:

24 Jul 2018 13:41

Magnificent news!

The yellow jackets have abandoned fort... not sure the boiling water did anything because I don't know how deep the tunnel is (I've read that some tunnels are as deep as 4ft.!), but I can vouch for the Sevin product. It comes in various forms, I just used the powder dust because I wanted to make sure it stuck to the yellow jackets (much like pollen), so they carry it with them wherever they go. Plus Sevin is supposed to be harmless toward plants and the environment, I'm very pleased with that.

https://www.amazon.com/Garden-5-Percent-Killer-Shaker-Canister/dp/B004HVWB14/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1532438955&sr=8-1&keywords=sevin+dust+powder


jmdirt wrote:https://www.industrialspring.com/resources/measure-order-torsion-
If you have a pro do the work they will do all that for you though.
I've looked through the charts on that site, they're about as incomprehensible to me as some of Sheldon Brown's. :lol:

Thank you anyway, jmd, I just ended up getting a couple of quotes - one guy wanted $128, the other $162. After doing some research it's about what I expected, naturally I went with the less expensive guy.

I want to be able to at least watch him do it, that way I can do it myself next time.
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Re: Re:

24 Jul 2018 19:23

Tricycle Rider wrote:Magnificent news!

The yellow jackets have abandoned fort... not sure the boiling water did anything because I don't know how deep the tunnel is (I've read that some tunnels are as deep as 4ft.!), but I can vouch for the Sevin product. It comes in various forms, I just used the powder dust because I wanted to make sure it stuck to the yellow jackets (much like pollen), so they carry it with them wherever they go. Plus Sevin is supposed to be harmless toward plants and the environment, I'm very pleased with that.

https://www.amazon.com/Garden-5-Percent-Killer-Shaker-Canister/dp/B004HVWB14/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1532438955&sr=8-1&keywords=sevin+dust+powder


jmdirt wrote:https://www.industrialspring.com/resources/measure-order-torsion-
If you have a pro do the work they will do all that for you though.
I've looked through the charts on that site, they're about as incomprehensible to me as some of Sheldon Brown's. :lol:

Thank you anyway, jmd, I just ended up getting a couple of quotes - one guy wanted $128, the other $162. After doing some research it's about what I expected, naturally I went with the less expensive guy.

I want to be able to at least watch him do it, that way I can do it myself next time.

I think that you can just match numbers without having to use charts. Do those prices include the spring?
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Re: Re:

26 Jul 2018 13:19

jmdirt wrote:I think that you can just match numbers without having to use charts. Do those prices include the spring?
The grand total ended up being $150 -- $90 for labor, and the rest for the spring. There was no way around the $90 because that's his minimum rate for the first hour of labor regardless, and the new spring is longer than the old one. So I'm not sure how I would have gone about selecting a size that would work with my door if I had had to buy it myself, think the old one was some exotic size that is no longer available. (At least I couldn't find one that size on the webs.)

Btw., I called that place that you linked me to, they sell to contractors only. They referred me to another place that sells to the general public, the guy I spoke to over the phone only managed to confuse me and he wanted $72+ shipping for a custom-size spring.

Bah, it's all over and done with, springs usually last up to 10 years, so I won't have to think about this for a while. So now back to my unfinished symphony - the freaking attic ladder DIY.

I think I'll just sand it down so the legs are even, and then I'll glue some grippy stuff you normally put under a rug so it's not so slippery. It'll be an absolute masterpiece - once it's actually finished.
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Re: Re:

26 Jul 2018 14:38

Tricycle Rider wrote:
jmdirt wrote:I think that you can just match numbers without having to use charts. Do those prices include the spring?
The grand total ended up being $150 -- $90 for labor, and the rest for the spring. There was no way around the $90 because that's his minimum rate for the first hour of labor regardless, and the new spring is longer than the old one. So I'm not sure how I would have gone about selecting a size that would work with my door if I had had to buy it myself, think the old one was some exotic size that is no longer available. (At least I couldn't find one that size on the webs.)

Btw., I called that place that you linked me to, they sell to contractors only. They referred me to another place that sells to the general public, the guy I spoke to over the phone only managed to confuse me and he wanted $72+ shipping for a custom-size spring.

Bah, it's all over and done with, springs usually last up to 10 years, so I won't have to think about this for a while. So now back to my unfinished symphony - the freaking attic ladder DIY.

I think I'll just sand it down so the legs are even, and then I'll glue some grippy stuff you normally put under a rug so it's not so slippery. It'll be an absolute masterpiece - once it's actually finished.

Its good to hear that your door is fixed.
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26 Jul 2018 15:27

Trike you forgot to add that the entire event was injury free ...and that's worth something..glad you and your door are fully operational
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Re: Re:

26 Jul 2018 16:33

jmdirt wrote:Its good to hear that your door is fixed.
Unchained wrote:Trike you forgot to add that the entire event was injury free ...and that's worth something..glad you and your door are fully operational
Thanks guys, I'm relieved about it as well. When you think about it spending $150 on something that should last 10 years is definitely worth the cost of knowing that somebody did the job right.

Did what I just wrote make sense? I've been sanding for the past hour... I really hate my rotary sander, but I'm not willing to spend hundreds of dollars on a more practical one. Gotta draw the line somewhere. :)
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29 Jul 2018 02:02

I went round and round trying to fix the brakes on my motorcycle..it's a heavy pig but when I ride off-road O can't stay the ABS!!!when you try and use the brake to slide the rest off the bike..the ABS ..doesn't really allow the wheel to lock up..if you try and use road techniques..you grab a little front brake..and the whole front end washes out and you go down..
I purchased an accessory switch that looks stock..ran a little wire to the fuse block and now have the ability to turn off the anti lock brakes on the fly..ran the wire..made two tails and basically get in front of the fuse..I prefer to call it the ABS on-off switch rather than the blown fuse on purpose switch.
The dealer told me he would not make any mods to the factory brake operations..you know the old liability thing.two off road shops gave me quotes of $560-700 bucks...switch,wire..tiny black tie wraps and coffee,beer and donuts for my labor..it took about 4-5 hours and @$25 bucks..it took so long because I wanted it to look factory..had to route mine w the other wiring..getting it under the jacket if possible..
Starting towards San Francisco Monday...doing Ensenada to Parkfield Junction the first day...doing a BLM ..$5 dollar camp site day one
Unchained
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Re:

30 Jul 2018 19:51

Unchained wrote:I went round and round trying to fix the brakes on my motorcycle..it's a heavy pig but when I ride off-road O can't stay the ABS!!!when you try and use the brake to slide the rest off the bike..the ABS ..doesn't really allow the wheel to lock up..if you try and use road techniques..you grab a little front brake..and the whole front end washes out and you go down..
I purchased an accessory switch that looks stock..ran a little wire to the fuse block and now have the ability to turn off the anti lock brakes on the fly..ran the wire..made two tails and basically get in front of the fuse..I prefer to call it the ABS on-off switch rather than the blown fuse on purpose switch.
The dealer told me he would not make any mods to the factory brake operations..you know the old liability thing.two off road shops gave me quotes of $560-700 bucks...switch,wire..tiny black tie wraps and coffee,beer and donuts for my labor..it took about 4-5 hours and @$25 bucks..it took so long because I wanted it to look factory..had to route mine w the other wiring..getting it under the jacket if possible..
Starting towards San Francisco Monday...doing Ensenada to Parkfield Junction the first day...doing a BLM ..$5 dollar camp site day one
Que? I don't understand what any of this means, but I'm glad you were able to DIY it. :cool:

Image

On this front I'm working on the attic ladder... I've already sanded the wooden legs down so they are reasonably even, now I'm trying to see if the grippy rug stuff will stick to them. I'm using my favorite slippers as a prototype - I'm using some hot glue on the grippy stuff. Don't know if this will work - we shall see!

Image
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31 Jul 2018 13:12

An option for 'grippy pad' is to find a suitable computer mouse pad, or maybe cut a piece from an old inner tube.
You DO save old inner tubes, right! Cut out the valve and they make great 'ropes' for holding things together and easy to remove.

Jay
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Re:

01 Aug 2018 13:26

JayKosta wrote:An option for 'grippy pad' is to find a suitable computer mouse pad, or maybe cut a piece from an old inner tube.
You DO save old inner tubes, right! Cut out the valve and they make great 'ropes' for holding things together and easy to remove.

Jay
I sure do. I save old tires as well... I think I have a hoarding problem.

That's a great idea about using old tubes as bungee cord sort of thingies, I hadn't thought if that.

Thanks, Jay!
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05 Aug 2018 15:13

Grrrrrrr, update on the freaking yellow jackets...

Yesterday, after I thought I had successfully fixed the problem, I noticed the tunnel to their nest was once again fully open and they were merrily flying back and forth into it. I've read that this can happen if you don't plug the tunnel up properly, which I clearly didn't do. So I had this brilliant idea to plug the tunnel with a mud mixture made of water and soil...

It was only early evening when they were still pretty active, I approached the tunnel anyway with my mud mixture. I didn't get too far when I heard a yellow jacket buzzing around my ear - I ran like a bat out of hell and in the process I managed to trip and spill the mud all over myself. It was quite the scene, but at least I didn't get stung.

So early this morning while the yellow jackets were still having their beauty sleep I poured some more of that Sevin stuff down the tunnel, and then I pounded a tennis ball into the opening. (Plus covered it with dirt and more Sevin stuff.) I'm so tempted to just spray the **** out of them with Raid, but...

I've read that yellow jackets have a ferocious instinct to feed and protect their young, they are certainly very determined. But so am I, hopefully the tennis ball and Sevin will do the job this time!

On a more successful note - my ladder project is at last finished, hopefully it'll last a while. (I took MI's advice and am hiding the dead bodies elsewhere now, so won't be climbing up and down the ladder as much.) The legs are pretty even, and the grippy stuff seems to be sticking to them pretty well.

Image
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15 Aug 2018 13:43

Today I get to repair what every self-respecting DIYer has, I get to replace the parts in a toilet tank.

Think I only need to replace the anti-syphon, or all the parts, are these parts universal? So many questions...

Stay tuned, this should be just thrilling!
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15 Aug 2018 19:27

I don't know what you mean by the anti-siphon ...
Main toilet problems are:
1) The tank slowly leaks into the bowl, and then the input valve opens and runs for a short time. The usual fix is to replace the 'flapper stopper' or the the 'drop down stopper'.
2) The input valve doesn't close and the water in the tank fills-up too high and runs down the 'overflow' tube into the tank. The water in the tank should be at least 1/2 inch below the top of the overflow tube. The valve assembly should have some way to regulate the height of the water. Old style has adjustment screws.
If you need to replace the valve, then the plastic 'FLOW MASTER' work quite well.

If you're not familiar with how the valve / float / stopper work - take pictures and take them to Home Depot and they'll get you the proper pieces.

To change the valve -
1) turn OFF the water going into the toilet and make SURE it's OFF by flushing and that no water goes into the tank.
2) remove the remaining water from the tank, by scooping it into the bowl, and then sponge to get the last bits.
3) have a bowl under the toilet supply line to catch the little bit of water when you unscrew the line.
4) unscrew the nut that holds the top of the LINE onto the bottom of the toilet. IF the line is solid metal tubing, then replace it with a flexible line (measure the distance and tell the guy at HD - you want the line to be a little long so it is easy work with. Don't try to reuse a solid metal tube - nothing but trouble ...
5) unscrew the big nut that holds the valve onto the bottom of the toilet.
6) install the new valve per the instructions on the package.

Jay
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Re:

15 Aug 2018 20:42

JayKosta wrote:I don't know what you mean by the anti-siphon ...
Main toilet problems are:
1) The tank slowly leaks into the bowl, and then the input valve opens and runs for a short time. The usual fix is to replace the 'flapper stopper' or the the 'drop down stopper'.
2) The input valve doesn't close and the water in the tank fills-up too high and runs down the 'overflow' tube into the tank. The water in the tank should be at least 1/2 inch below the top of the overflow tube. The valve assembly should have some way to regulate the height of the water. Old style has adjustment screws.
If you need to replace the valve, then the plastic 'FLOW MASTER' work quite well.

If you're not familiar with how the valve / float / stopper work - take pictures and take them to Home Depot and they'll get you the proper pieces.

To change the valve -
1) turn OFF the water going into the toilet and make SURE it's OFF by flushing and that no water goes into the tank.
2) remove the remaining water from the tank, by scooping it into the bowl, and then sponge to get the last bits.
3) have a bowl under the toilet supply line to catch the little bit of water when you unscrew the line.
4) unscrew the nut that holds the top of the LINE onto the bottom of the toilet. IF the line is solid metal tubing, then replace it with a flexible line (measure the distance and tell the guy at HD - you want the line to be a little long so it is easy work with. Don't try to reuse a solid metal tube - nothing but trouble ...
5) unscrew the big nut that holds the valve onto the bottom of the toilet.
6) install the new valve per the instructions on the package.

Jay
To be honest Jay, I don't know what I mean by anti-siphon either. I just looked it up on the internets and that's what it told me the part is called.

I'm trying to replace the internal works of the toilet tank not because anything is leaking, but because it just doesn't seem to be working/filling with water properly. I got one of those universal toilet repair kits, so far I find the instructions to be very confusing.

I'm getting very frustrated right about now... maybe I just need to walk away from it and give it some deeper thought.

PS - I definitely did turn off/disconnected the water supply and had drained the toilet tank before I started messing around with this, this much at least I do know.
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