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The DIY thread

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Re:

20 Jul 2016 21:29

Tricycle Rider wrote:...
I at least won't use is that really toxic shite called Round-Up.)

----------------------
For a less toxic small area vegetation 'kill all' I use plain table salt for things such as weeds in driveway cracks, etc.
Dig out the existing weeds as best you can, and then pour plain cheap salt on the crack and give a slight watering to get the salt to soak in (but don't rinse it away!).
I wouldn't use salt on weeds intermixed with other plants that you want to keep, but for driveway / sidewalk cracks it works pretty well.

Jay Kosta
Endwell NY USA
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Re: Re:

22 Jul 2016 19:45

JayKosta wrote:----------------------
For a less toxic small area vegetation 'kill all' I use plain table salt for things such as weeds in driveway cracks, etc.
Dig out the existing weeds as best you can, and then pour plain cheap salt on the crack and give a slight watering to get the salt to soak in (but don't rinse it away!).
I wouldn't use salt on weeds intermixed with other plants that you want to keep, but for driveway / sidewalk cracks it works pretty well.

Jay Kosta
Endwell NY USA
Should it be iodized, non-iodized, sea, Kosher, or non-Kosher table salt? (Just kidding, I crack myself up!)

I'll give it a go on the weed in the "safe" areas, sounds like a reasonable alternative to Round-Up.

Thanks for the tip, Jay Kosta! :)
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25 Jul 2016 21:24

Right, so providing the material isn't too stretchy you can probably put your own torn clothes back together with a simple sewing machine. (I like a really simple Singer, your mileage may vary.)

Image
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27 Jul 2016 18:24

So I tried Wipe New Headlight Restore on my 10 year old, oxi-glazed headlights. My goal was to get a little more light out ahead of me at night. The nice side benefit is, as my wife put it, 'it makes the front of the truck look so much nicer'. Before: couldn't even see the bulb, after: the bulb is very clearly visible. It exceeded my expectation for appearance. I don't know if they look quite 'new', but close. I'll have to wait until the next time I drive at night to check that improvement, and obviously I won't know about durability until ?

It took about 15 minutes per lens to wet sand 10 years of oxidation off/out. Hint: use a squirt bottle to keep the lens wet and the oxi flowing away.
The sealing wipe step takes about 10 seconds per lens.

http://www.wipenew.com/wipe-new-headlights/
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Re:

27 Jul 2016 18:28

Tricycle Rider wrote:DIY beauty tips for the really, really cheap people (such as me), and this is probably more for the two or three other ladies in this joint...

I cannot justify paying a beautician a small fortune to color my hair, or to bleach my "Eastern European" mustache, so I just do it myself with some cheap hair dye and with some creme hair bleach.

As long as you read the product instructions (which nobody likes to do), I'm pretty sure your hair won't fall out, and you won't burn yourself with the cream bleach. (Though, after so many years of coloring my hair with cheap dye it may have turned slightly curly, which I actually like because now I don't have to get perms.)

Image

Don't be afraid, lads, I swear I will look so much more human after I get all these chemicals off me! :)

Hey, we've never gotten proof of this! ;)
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Re: Re:

27 Jul 2016 21:47

jmdirt wrote:Hey, we've never gotten proof of this! ;)
Sorry, jmdirt, while I was trying to look somewhat human my dad coaxed me into cleaning his kayak.

Image

Usually this is something you can do yourself with a sponge and some "Soft Scrub", but this may also be an excellent time to observe what kind of shape your hull is in. (As in, if the scratches are too deep you may be looking into getting yourself a new kayak. Which I'm sure my dad would love, not so sure my mom would be cool with it, though.)
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Re:

29 Jul 2016 22:54

jmdirt wrote:So I tried Wipe New Headlight Restore on my 10 year old, oxi-glazed headlights. My goal was to get a little more light out ahead of me at night. The nice side benefit is, as my wife put it, 'it makes the front of the truck look so much nicer'. Before: couldn't even see the bulb, after: the bulb is very clearly visible. It exceeded my expectation for appearance. I don't know if they look quite 'new', but close. I'll have to wait until the next time I drive at night to check that improvement, and obviously I won't know about durability until ?

It took about 15 minutes per lens to wet sand 10 years of oxidation off/out. Hint: use a squirt bottle to keep the lens wet and the oxi flowing away.
The sealing wipe step takes about 10 seconds per lens.

http://www.wipenew.com/wipe-new-headlights/
Sorry if I may have ignored this at first... glad to hear this product had seemed to work for you and your headlights.

Do you think this would also work on some very old plastic rear lights? (I know I'm supposed to read the reviews of the product, but I would rather trust you and your judgment of the product.)
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Re: Re:

30 Jul 2016 03:31

The headlight refurbishing products work by removing a thin layer of the 'plastic' that has become dull or frosted by exposure to sunlight, and hitting 'grit' in the air when driving at highway speed. Removal of the thin exterior layer exposes the clear underlayer which allows more light to shine thru it.

If the rear light are old and faded, then the color change might go all the way thru the plastic, and just removing the thin exterior layer might not be of any benefit.

Jay Kosta
Endwell NY USA
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Re: Re:

30 Jul 2016 03:46

Tricycle Rider wrote:
jmdirt wrote:So I tried Wipe New Headlight Restore on my 10 year old, oxi-glazed headlights. My goal was to get a little more light out ahead of me at night. The nice side benefit is, as my wife put it, 'it makes the front of the truck look so much nicer'. Before: couldn't even see the bulb, after: the bulb is very clearly visible. It exceeded my expectation for appearance. I don't know if they look quite 'new', but close. I'll have to wait until the next time I drive at night to check that improvement, and obviously I won't know about durability until ?

It took about 15 minutes per lens to wet sand 10 years of oxidation off/out. Hint: use a squirt bottle to keep the lens wet and the oxi flowing away.
The sealing wipe step takes about 10 seconds per lens.

http://www.wipenew.com/wipe-new-headlights/
Sorry if I may have ignored this at first... glad to hear this product had seemed to work for you and your headlights.

Do you think this would also work on some very old plastic rear lights? (I know I'm supposed to read the reviews of the product, but I would rather trust you and your judgment of the product.)

I think that jay may be correct, but you could wet sand a little bit to test it. If they are just oxidized, this kit should work just fine. There was one guy on youtube who used it on his tail lights, but they looked pretty good to start with.
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Re: Re:

31 Jul 2016 14:50

[quote="jmdirt"
I think that jay may be correct, but you could wet sand a little bit to test it. If they are just oxidized, this kit should work just fine. There was one guy on youtube who used it on his tail lights, but they looked pretty good to start with.
I might try to wet sand a small spot then and see if it does anything, the tail lights belong to the '67 Bug. (Can't really make them much worse... well, if there's a way I'm sure I'll find it. Ha!) Speaking of Bug...

I have to say that ultra fine automotive sandpaper just rocks, now that I have actually used it. (Re-sanded the roof, Bondoed it, sanded some more, I'm much happier with the results now.)

Anyhoo, thanks jmdirt and Jay Kosta for the tips, I love this thread!
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31 Jul 2016 18:26

Murder, murder most foul!

Any aquarium keepers here?

I keep a small 10 gallon aquarium, most recently I had acquired a couple of baby male sword tails. (Gorgeous, aren't they?)

In addition to that I had an elderly Tetra in there, just today I had found her dead.

Now, did she die of old age, or did the sword tails just knock her out, which had led her to her unfortunate demise?

Other than that I just completely change the water twice a year, and in the meantime I use "AquaSafe Plus" to any water I add, and I try to change the filter about every three months.

So there we have it.
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06 Aug 2016 17:42

Right, so here's a "progress" report on the Bug...

After much sanding, building up, and sanding some more I sprayed the roof with two coats of Flex Seal... unless the whole damn roof peels off it's looking rather promising. Image

Have to wait for the Flex Seal to cure, and then I'll finally be able to spray paint again, this time with only a semi-gloss. (And while I will not be able to be happy with it because it's not perfect I'll be, at least, able to sleep again. I have to remind myself of the prime directive - it was so the roof doesn't leak once it starts raining!)
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11 Aug 2016 19:47

There are quite a few things I hate more than prepping a place for painting (taping, covering things up you don't want painted), but it's just something you gotta do and get over with. So here's more progress on the Bug (ended up having to repaint it with a satin finish because I wasn't happy with the semi-gloss)...Image

Much like the Bianchi "Celeste green" the manufacturer's color changes from year to year (sometimes it's more blue, sometimes more green), so now I have to paint the whole car because the color I had painted it with a few years back in no way matches the color now.

Ah well, I'd like to think it's a labor of love, but actually it kinda sucks. But if you love your old car enough you'll just do it.
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13 Aug 2016 14:53

Dear god, I just hate the satin finish "hunter green"... thankfully I only did the roof, if I had done the whole car with it the Bug would look like a goddamn Nazi war tank! (Just slap a swastika on it and it's ready for WWII.)

So here I go again re-doing it with a gloss finish - I will hate it because the surface is uneven, but I just really don't want for my Buggie to look like some kind of a relic from wars past.
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13 Aug 2016 17:15

For those of you who are following my "Bug project"... this is what the car looked like initially before I ever got my hands on it. (Second pic is after I got done with it.)
Image

Sanding, priming, resurfacing, all of that I've already done several years ago. So now I just have to repaint it (besides having to fix all the chips and nooks)...

Mostly I just have to remind myself that it can never be perfect, unless I somehow scrounge up the money to get it done professionally. (I'm afraid that kind of money I don't have at the moment, so I just have to DIY. :))
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13 Aug 2016 18:15

You must love your car, TR. All shiny and and ready to go again.
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Re:

13 Aug 2016 18:53

Dazed and Confused wrote:You must love your car, TR. All shiny and and ready to go again.
Oh man, a couple of decades ago my bro and dad took the whole engine apart, and they had cleaned each and every part. What I've been doing is merely cosmetic, and while this may suck...

Once you get ahold of a classic VW (be it Van or Bug), you never let 'em go!

Peace, bro! :cool:
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13 Aug 2016 19:11

Better stay clear of the bug then....

Anyway installing a new tumble dryer over the weekend as the old one generated more heat than the local power station. But the sales guy forgot about some tube part.... going back to the store..... Must remain calm......
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Re:

13 Aug 2016 19:26

Dazed and Confused wrote:Better stay clear of the bug then....

Anyway installing a new tumble dryer over the weekend as the old one generated more heat than the local power station. But the sales guy forgot about some tube part.... going back to the store..... Must remain calm......
Dude, just stay calm...

You know that weekends are the worst time to go to a hardware shop, right? (From my experience from working at a hardware shop - going first thing in the morning is the best time to go. The only people you'll encounter then is contractors [who already know what they're doing], and you'll probably get some knowledgeable sales people all to yourself.)

I just think your timing was bad, nothing wrong with your DIY project.
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Re: Re:

13 Aug 2016 20:42

Tricycle Rider wrote:
Dazed and Confused wrote:Better stay clear of the bug then....

Anyway installing a new tumble dryer over the weekend as the old one generated more heat than the local power station. But the sales guy forgot about some tube part.... going back to the store..... Must remain calm......
Dude, just stay calm...

You know that weekends are the worst time to go to a hardware shop, right? (From my experience from working at a hardware shop - going first thing in the morning is the best time to go. The only people you'll encounter then is contractors [who already know what they're doing], and you'll probably get some knowledgeable sales people all to yourself.)

I just think your timing was bad, nothing wrong with your DIY project.


Thx for the advice. Got the tube, worry its not long enough for existing hole in wall. Might have to drill another higher up the wall something I don't want to do.
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