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***Book Club***

Grab a short black and come join in the non-cycling discussion. Favourite books, movies, holiday destinations, other sports - chat about it all in the cafe.

Moderators: Eshnar, Irondan, King Boonen, Red Rick, Pricey_sky

14 Oct 2009 13:27

others have mentioned Charles Bukowski in this thread. I think he is very good also. His book Ham On Rye is a coming of age of Henry Chinaski and is much more interesting than Catcher in the Rye.

Post Office is another good Chinaski novel.

Barfly, the movie, was about the character Heny Chinaski and played by Mickey Rourke. The screeplay incorporates various scenes from the Chinaski novels (including his love of classical music) and its a really good movie in my opinion wwith a great soundtrack. (Mike Magnussan in Heft On Wheels talks about this movie also as being one of his favorites.)

Chinaski is an anti-social, asocial, anti-hero who lives a hard drinking, brawling life. He is the emobiment of nihilism.
Sheltowee
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14 Oct 2009 14:17

Lately,

William Gibson - Neuromancer (excellent)
Orson Scott Card - Empire (average)

Half way through Cosmos, Sagan's storytelling seems quite unique.
Ferminal
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28 Oct 2009 02:30

Dan Brown - The Lost Symbol. Predictable, OK, but not in the realm of Angels and Demons and the Da Vinci Code.

Ray Bradbury - Fahrenheit 451. Excellent. Classic which can translate easily to current society.

Ernest Hemingway - A Farewell to Arms. Haven't finished yet, but am thoroughly enjoying the read!
"If you're going through hell, keep going." - Winston Churchill
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30 Oct 2009 00:01

I was just remembering this quote from Blood Meridian by Cormac McCarthy:

Moral law is an invention of mankind for the disenfranchisement of the powerful in favor of the weak. Historical law subverts it at every turn. A moral view can never be proven right or wrong by any ultimate test. A man falling dead in a duel is not thought thereby to be proven in error as to his views. His very involvement in such a trial gives evidence of a new and broader view. The willingness of the principals to forgo further argument as the triviality which it in fact is and to petition directly the chambers of the historical absolute clearly indicates of how little moment are the opinions and of what great moment the divergences thereof. For the argument is indeed trivial, but not so the seperate wills thereby made manifest. Man's vanity may well approach the infinite in capacity but his knowledge remains imperfect and howevermuch he comes to value his judgements ultimately he must submit them before a higher court. Here there can be no special pleading. Here are considerations of equity and rectitude and moral right rendered void and without warrant and here are the views of the litigants despised. Decisions of life and death, of what shall be and what shall not, beggar all question of right. In elections of these magnitudes are all lesser ones subsumed, moral, spiritual, natural.

There is more to it, and you have to read the book to have it fully in context, but still, just a great piece of writing.
Thoughtforfood
 

30 Oct 2009 00:52

So there's some new Nabokov on the horizon. Apparently some publisher finally got a hold of the rights to it and it will be published according to the note cards Nabokov composed it on. (Dude wrote everything on note cards. Craziness.)

Anywho, looking forward to that.

As for my top choices:

Joyce's Portrait, DFW's short stories, Yeats & Auden (together, of course), Kundera's Immortality, and pretty much anything Tolstoy wrote.

Am currently reading Sons & Lovers and watching a LOT of zombie movies.
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01 Nov 2009 02:21

Anyone read Into The Wild? I remember reading about that kid in the Washington Post when they found his body.

Everest, A Mountaineering History was fascinating.
I'm no mountain climber, but it's a great read.
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01 Nov 2009 12:53

knewcleardaze wrote:Anyone read Into The Wild? I remember reading about that kid in the Washington Post when they found his body.

Everest, A Mountaineering History was fascinating.
I'm no mountain climber, but it's a great read.


I have read Into The Wild. It was a very good book, but also romantacized what in essence was sheer stupidity on the part of the main character, Christopher McCandless.

I too am no mountaineer, but love reading about the exploits of mountaineers. Into Thin Air by Krakauer is also an excellent book, but the best mountaineering (and survival) book ever published has to be Touching the Void by Joe Simpson. Simply stirring stuff.
"If you're going through hell, keep going." - Winston Churchill
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01 Nov 2009 13:38

The Last American Man by Elizabeth Gilbert - non-fiction.
Eustace Conway is one of a kind.
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25 Nov 2009 11:13

I am currently re-reading The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe. Oddly enough, I had never read this until the movie came out a few years ago.

Susan
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25 Nov 2009 13:12

Thoughtforfood wrote:I was just remembering this quote from Blood Meridian by Cormac McCarthy:

Moral law is an invention of mankind for the disenfranchisement of the powerful in favor of the weak. Historical law subverts it at every turn. A moral view can never be proven right or wrong by any ultimate test. A man falling dead in a duel is not thought thereby to be proven in error as to his views. His very involvement in such a trial gives evidence of a new and broader view. The willingness of the principals to forgo further argument as the triviality which it in fact is and to petition directly the chambers of the historical absolute clearly indicates of how little moment are the opinions and of what great moment the divergences thereof. For the argument is indeed trivial, but not so the seperate wills thereby made manifest. Man's vanity may well approach the infinite in capacity but his knowledge remains imperfect and howevermuch he comes to value his judgements ultimately he must submit them before a higher court. Here there can be no special pleading. Here are considerations of equity and rectitude and moral right rendered void and without warrant and here are the views of the litigants despised. Decisions of life and death, of what shall be and what shall not, beggar all question of right. In elections of these magnitudes are all lesser ones subsumed, moral, spiritual, natural.

There is more to it, and you have to read the book to have it fully in context, but still, just a great piece of writing.


That first sentence could be a quote from Nietzsche's "On the Genealogy of Morality"!
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25 Nov 2009 16:32

I'm currently reading Max Manus. An autobiography combining two books by a member of the Norwegian resistance during WWII. He wrote the first book in seclusion (sort of) immediately after the war ended and the second book the following year.

It is compelling reading albeit a little slow for me as it's only written in 1940's era bokmål Norwegian. Don' think it is available in English.

There's a relatively informative page on him in Wikipedia in English.
[SIZE="1"][/SIZE]"If the wings are traveling faster than the fuselage, it's probably a helicopter -- and therefore, unsafe."
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26 Nov 2009 03:41

Canada and other matters of opinion by Rex Murphy.

A compilation of columns and talking points from Murphy's work at The Globe and Mail (print) and The National (television). An extremely well spoken man whose humorous observations of the absurdities in life and politics (left and right) make for a very interesting read.
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26 Nov 2009 03:56

Here's one that could be misconstrued as cycling-specific: Albert Camus' The myth of Sisyphus. Always climbing the hill/mountain and knowing it will lead to an inevitable descent.
Aside from that another one that sticks with me is Milan Kundera's The Unbearable Lightness of Being (damn, that could be cycling-specific too:))
Michael Crichton's The Andromeda Strain and Timeline.
Clarke's 2001 and 2010 (as if you didn't already know{see icon}).
Everyone else has given me some great ideas as I have become way too selective to the point of not reading for fear of boredom and the anti-climatic.
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26 Nov 2009 15:06

Nabokov's Lolita. Tragicomedy at it's finest.
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26 Nov 2009 22:49

Last book i read: On The Road, by Jack Kerouac.
Up next: Into the wild (Jon Krakauer)

I'm in travelling mode:D
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27 Nov 2009 04:22

Buffalo Soldier wrote:Last book i read: On The Road, by Jack Kerouac.
Up next: Into the wild (Jon Krakauer)

I'm in travelling mode:D


That's funny, I was going to write about how much I disliked Into the Wild. Read it last week. Not sure if I just cannot sympathize with the protagonist or if it's Krakauer's writing style that annoys me. I hope you like it better than I did.
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27 Nov 2009 10:28

I saw the movie first, and i did like that!
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27 Nov 2009 21:02

I saw the movie Into the Wild as well and would like to read the book. Pretty sure the book would add more depth. Movie portrayed some realism in terms of nutritional debt-- too hungry to hunt and search for food. Takes less effort to whither and die. Sad. Krakauer also has written another, new controversial book. Has anyone read that one yet? I have that one on order.
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29 Nov 2009 12:52

Susan Westemeyer wrote:I am currently re-reading The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe. Oddly enough, I had never read this until the movie came out a few years ago.Susan


A sign of an English education in the early 70's....being read the Lion, the Witch and The Wardrobe by your teachers every year until you were old enough to read it yourself, then being made to read it.

Just finished City of Thieves by david Benioff - that was a good read.
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30 Nov 2009 15:02

started 'Once an Eagle' by Anton Myrer
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