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Race Design Challenge

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Re: Race Design Challenge

28 Oct 2015 08:57

100th Giro stage 11: Bassano del Grappa - Treviso 56 km

Stage type: Individual Time Trial
Difficulty: *****
Original stage: Giro 1970 stage 9
Climbs: None

Image

Overview:
The last chance for the TTers, a long and flat ITT of raw power. Even though with this one the flat(tish) TTing kms reach the number of 118.4, you'll soon notice this Giro still favours the climbers ;)

Giro of the stage:
The 1970 Giro had one of the weirdest designs ever. It went from S.Pellegrino Terme to Bolzano over 20 stages, swinging west and east at first, and then south and north again. Really odd. It was not a hard route at all, the key stages being the MTFs to Brentonico and Fedaia, as well as the ITT presented here. The main favourites were two: the defending champion Felice Gimondi, and Eddy Merckx. In 1969 Merckx had been found positive while he was leading the GC and kicked out of the Giro, leaving the victory to Gimondi and starting a whirlwind of accusations and conspiracy theories, also risking his participation at the Tour, which ultimately he'll be allowed to race (=win). He didn't plan to take part in the 1970 Giro, still feeling outraged by what happened, but in the end he was convinced by his (Italian) team. He won the pink jersey in Brentonico on stage 7, and would not lose it anymore, winning his second Giro (after the 1968 edition), and laying the foundation of his first Double (he will win his second Tour later that year), third rider in history to accomplish it after Coppi and Anquetil.

Stage of the stage:
Well, it was an ITT and Merckx was in it. Not much to add. He won in 1h 10' 55", followed by Ole Ritter at +1' 46" and Gimondi at +2' 2". All in all it was a pretty uneventful stage... but I needed to include it for balance reasons :D As well as to commemorate the first Merckx's Double.

Protagonists of the stage:

Eddy Merckx:

Image

Felice Gimondi:
Image

Ole Ritter:
Image

Next stage:
It will be medium mountain, and will deal with betrayals, internal wars and other nasty stuff. This one's easy. ;)
A race that doesn't give an attacker the chance to finish it off alone is not a race anymore.


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01 Nov 2015 15:17

Eshnar... the tension is killing me :D
Brullnux
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Re:

01 Nov 2015 20:22

Brullnux wrote:Eshnar... the tension is killing me :D

sorry... I'll be back tomorrow or latest on Tuesday :o
A race that doesn't give an attacker the chance to finish it off alone is not a race anymore.


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Re: Race Design Challenge

03 Nov 2015 09:56

100th Giro stage 12: Lido di Jesolo - Sappada 224 km

Stage type: Medium Mountain
Difficulty: ***
Original stage: Giro 1987 stage 15
Climbs: Forcella di Monte Rest (GPM.3), Sella Valcalda (GPM.3), Cima Sappada (GPM.3)

Image
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Overview:
Medium mountain stage in Friuli, with a long and irregular final climb very close to the finish. It's possible to see some GC battle on the final ramps, if the breakaway doesn't make it.

Giro of the stage:
The 1987 edition started in Sanremo, with three stages in two days: a 4 km prologue on the first, a 31 km road stage on the morning of the second and a Poggio descent ITT on the afternoon. Other than that, there were other three time trials: a TTT on stage 3, an ITT to S.Marino and the final ITT on the final day, from Aosta to S.Vincent. The mountain stages: a MTF to the Terminillo, a finish in Canazei after the Fedaia, Riva del Garda after the Bondone, a MTF to Madesimo after the S.Marco and a 252 km MTF to Pila on the penultimate day. It had nice medium mountain, too: Montalcino, Roccaraso and Sappada were the most dangerous stages. The main favourite at the start was the defending champion Roberto Visentini, who was supposed to be helped by his teammate Stephen Roche (and then to return the favour at the Tour). His team, Carrera, was by far the strongest on paper. Other main protagonists were Robert Millar, Erik Breukink, Johan van der Velde and the world champion Moreno Argentin.
Things were going great for Carrera at first. Visentini won the prologue, Roche won the Poggio descent TT and wore pink when Carrera won the TTT. Roche kept the jersey for 10 days without particular problems (he even tried to attack on the Terminillo, with Visentini not particularly amused), but on the S.Marino ITT Visentini destroyed him, winning the stage with Roche at +2'47". Visentini got the pink jersey with a pretty nice 2'42" over his own teammate. After the ITT the Carrera directors offically confirmed Visentini as the sole leader of the team. Roche however was not pleased by the recent turn of events, especially since there were rumours in the team that Visentini was actually planning to skip the Tour instead of going as a domestique. This was the situation coming in Lido di Jesolo.

Stage of the stage:
The stage starts calmly, with no major movements even on the first ascent. On the descent of Monte rest, however, the war starts: there's a breakaway forming, and Roche chases and goes with it. The breakaway starts to gain a sizeable advantage, the Carrera director starts feeling nervous and tells Roche to stop and return in the peloton. Roche does not obey but he just stays in the wheels of the breakaway, without pulling. Behind, all Carrera but one man, Roche's only friend Eddy Schepers, pull the peloton and reel the breakaway in. The atmosphere in the peloton and especially in Carrera is extremely nervous. The previous attack was apparently being planned by Roche himself, allied with a couple other teams. On the Sella Valcalda there's a much more serious attack by Millar, Bernard, Van der Velde, Lejarreta, Chioccioli... and Roche. This time he drops the act and takes pulls. Carrera chases again, but Visentini, who had been awfully nervous the whole day and was out of his mind, gets a hunger knock on the very first slopes of Cima Sappada and crumbles. At the front, Van der Velde attacks and wins the stage, while Roche, almost a minute down, gets the pink jersey with only 5" over a young Tony Rominger. Visentini arrives dead in Sappada with +6'50" from Van der Velde and 5'54" from Roche. All hell breaks loose after the stage, and Roche will be able to survive (literally) the following stages only thanks to the help of his only teammate and a few friendly teams. Visentini will try his best to take the pink back, but on the stage to Pila he will fall and DNF, while Millar and Breukink will join Roche on the final podium. This will be Roche's magical year: after the Giro he will win the Tour and the WRR, making the second and last Triple in history.

Protagonists of the stage:

Stephen Roche (being nice with Visentini's fans in Sappada :D) with Robert Millar:
Image

Roberto Visentini:
Image

Johan van der Velde:
Image

Erik Breukink:
Image

Next stage:
The race will go back to Bassano del Grappa, and will be reasonably flat.
A race that doesn't give an attacker the chance to finish it off alone is not a race anymore.


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03 Nov 2015 11:27

Great selection. I was hoping you would pick this stage or the stage to Pila. I think you went with the correct one.
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Re: Race Design Challenge

04 Nov 2015 13:55

100th Giro stage 13: Auronzo di Cadore - Bassano del Grappa 203 km

Stage type: Flat stage
Difficulty: **
Original stage: Giro 1946 stage 14
Climbs: Passo Falzarego (GPM.2)

Image

Overview:
Transitional stage, with only the Passo Falzarego to spice things up and possibly help the breakaway. With the last 120 kms flat, this should ultimately be a bunch sprint.

Giro of the stage:
With the dust of WW2 just settled, Italy desperately needed some sport to get distracted from all that mass destruction and stuff. In a year when even the Tour was not ready to restart yet, the Giro was. With 7 professional teams and other 30 riders grouped kinda randomly in 6 teams assembled only for this race, a peloton of 79 riders, all Italians, started from Milano on June 15th, that late in the year in order to start just after the Italian Constitutional Referendum which was about to change the Kingdom into a Republic. As it was common in those times, the route was a loop, starting and finishing in Milano. At the start Fausto Coppi was the main favourite, as recent winner of the MSR. His most accredited rival, the young Vito Ortelli. Gino Bartali was considered only an outsider, as he was already pretty old for the standard of the time (32 yo), and during the few races he rode during the war he never made a good impression. There were no other favourites, since Magni was not allowed to race, as he was accused of war crimes (he will be acquitted later in the trial).
It was a tormented Giro, full of controversies, ridden between ruins, with most of the spectators on the roads being workers taking a break from their reconstruction work (and many times the thing to be rebuilt was the road itself).
The race itself went on without too many highlights until the stage to Napoli (stage 7), where an attack by Bartali and Ortelli defeated Coppi, who also fell during that stage, arriving in Napoli with +6' in GC from the new pink jersey Ortelli (Bartali being at +2').
On stage 12, supposed to finish in Trieste, a group of Tito's activists ambushed the race, blocking the road with concrete blocks and forcing the organisers to call it a day and neutralize the stage. Nevertheless, a small group of riders decided to continue and arrive in Trieste, just to make a statement.
On the next stage, to Auronzo, Bartali and Coppi allied together and broke Ortelli, who was apparently sick that day. Bartali took the pink jersey. However, on the evening of the same day he received the news that the new president of the Italian Cycling Union had cancelled the permission for Italian riders to race the Tour de Suisse. The participation to that race was obviously worth quite some money for Bartali and many other riders. Bartali replied to the news by sending his pink jersey in a package to the president. He's not gonna start the next stage. Bartali then had a huge dinner apparently, sure that his Giro was over, and went to bed.

Stage of the stage:
Bartali woke up late that morning, and proceeded to have a generous breakfast. While he was still eating, his race director comes with the news that his threat worked and the president reinstated the permission for the TdS. Taken by surprised, Bartali was forced to get on his bike and start the stage. On the very first ramps of the Falzarego the race blows up, as it often happened at the time. Coppi attacks, and Bartali follows him to defend the pink. Pretty soon however Bartali realizes how big of a mistake the past dinner and breakfast were. He has to stop, starts puking and seems on the verge of retiring. Coppi sees him, and first he slows down, then he stops and comes back to assist Bartali. He felt he owed him one, when in 1940 Bartali helped him recovering a huge crisis on the Passo della Mauria and ultimately win the Giro. While riders overtake both of them, Coppi tries to help his rival, until Bartali feels a bit better and is too embarassed to keep Coppi there any longer. He tells him that he feels better, the debt is paid and he shouldn't wait for him anymore. Coppi then gets back on his bike and attacks. He goes on to chase all the riders who have overtaken him and reels them all in, getting first alone at the top. He then continues his action without waiting for anybody. Behind him, Bartali still struggles, but after the climb he starts to really feel better and leads the chase. Coppi wins solo in Bassano, but Bartali, leading a small group of chasers, loses only about a minute, keeping the jersey.
On the following stage, the final mountain stage to Trento, Coppi will attack again and almost win the whole race, but Bartali will keep the jersey by 47".
The most famous rivalry in cycling history, which is said to have even prevented a civil war in the post-war Italy, had just started. ;)

Protagonists of the stage:

Gino Bartali and Fausto Coppi (here they were on the Galibier, but this picture fits so well with this stage...):
Image

Vito Ortelli:
Image

Next stage:
Libertine won't harm any kittens...
A race that doesn't give an attacker the chance to finish it off alone is not a race anymore.


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Re: Race Design Challenge

04 Nov 2015 14:25

Eshnar wrote:Libertine won't harm any kittens...


Either Sagan can't participate.

Or....

Fedaia (FEDAIAAAAAAA!!!!!!!!)

Is it the 2011 stage?
Kwibus wrote:So much quesions they have. Answers they will never get.
So why questions? If no answers?
-Kwibus, one of the great philosophers of the 21st century
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Re: Race Design Challenge

04 Nov 2015 14:30

Red Rick wrote:Is it the 2011 stage?

Montalcino was my most recent stage, remember? :p
A race that doesn't give an attacker the chance to finish it off alone is not a race anymore.


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Re: Race Design Challenge

05 Nov 2015 09:50

100th Giro stage 14: Asiago - Selva di Val Gardena 215 km

Stage type: High Mountain
Difficulty: *****
Original stage: Giro 1998 stage 17
Climbs: Passo Duran (GPM.1), Forcella Staulanza (GPM.2), Passo Fedaia (GPM.1), Passo Sella (GPM.2)

Image
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Overview:
The most classic Dolomite passes as the start of the brutal mountain stages triplet that will probably decide the 100th Giro. Will the riders be conservative considering what's ahead? Should they, considering how much TTing they had? Who knows.

Giro of the stage:
The 1998 Giro started in Nice (abroad but no so much) with a prologue, before entering Italy the next day. The main features of the route were the early easy MTFs of Lago Laceno and S.Marino, the penultimate weekend with a MTF to Piancavallo and a ITT in Trieste, all before a terrific final week with 3 consecutive mountain stages, to Selva, Alpe di Pampeago and Montecampione, and last but not least the final ITT in Lugano on the penultimate day. One prologue and 22 stages, over 23 days without a single rest day.
The main favourites were the defending champion Ivan Gotti, the twice-Vuelta-winner Alex Zülle, the 1996 Giro winner Pavel Tonkov and of course Marco Pantani, who came from a bittersweet 1997, DNF at the Giro and third at the Tour.
Alex Zülle started the Giro in the best possible way, winning the prologue and the stage to Lago Laceno. His rivals didn't look particularly good: Gotti had to retire due to sickness, Tonkov and Pantani tried to attack him but without success. On the stage to Piancavallo they partially succeded, with Pantani winning the stage over Tonkov, with Zülle a bit behind, but with minimal differences. On the next day Zülle crushed the opposition in the ITT. Pantani in particular lost 3'26" there, but even so he was 3rd in GC at 3'48", with Tonkov 2nd at 2'02" and the Italian climber Giuseppe Guerini (3rd at the 1997 Giro) in 4th place at 4'21". All was set to enter the Dolomites.

Stage of the stage:
The race starts getting interesting on the Duran already, with a 15 men breakaway featuring very serious riders: Javier Otxoa, Luc Leblanc, Chepe Gonzalez, Gilberto Simoni, Stefano Garzelli, Vladislav Bobrik, Hernán Buenahora, Oscar Camenzind, Michele Bartoli and Davide Rebellin are the most notables. Many of these riders are not so far in GC, so that Zülle's team, Festina, is forced to work. The situation stays stable up until the start of the mighty Fedaia. With the climb just started, Camenzind attacks the front group, followed by Gonzales and Buenahora. Behind them, Simoni, Bobrik, Sgambelluri, Tronca, and then a group with Leblanc, Forconi, Shefer and Rebellin. The peloton climbs the first part of Fedaia relatively slowly, still 40ish men in it. After Malga Ciapela, though, Tonkov attacks. Soon Pantani and Guerini follow him, while Zülle seems in difficulty, helped by only one teammate, Vladimir Belli. He stays in a small group, with the young Spaniard José Luis Rubiera between others. In front of him, Pantani accelerates and Tonkov cannot follow, but Guerini can. The two Italians go away and start overtaking part of the original breakaway. With the pink in danger already, Zülle attacks his group and reaches a 3-men group: the Spaniard Daniel Clavero and the two Italians Leonardo Piepoli and Paolo Savoldelli. At the top of Fedaia the race is completely blown up: Gonzales is first alone, followed within a minute by Buenahora and Camenzind; Pantani and Guerini are at 1'22"; Tonkov is with the Italian Nicola Miceli (4th at the 1997 Giro) at 2'12"; Zülle group at 3'10".
After the descent Pantani and Guerini reach the three riders in front, forming a 5-men group. Behind them, Tonkov and Miceli at 1', and Zülle with a now much larger group at 2'. At the start of Sella Pantani has a puncture but quickly changes bike and gets back to his group, and soon Buenahora and Camenzind (who will actually help his teammate Tonkov) are dropped. Behind, Zülle starts feeling increasingly bad, and people keep breaking away from him. Meanwhile, Pantani and Guerini manage to drop even Gonzales and go away in perfect agreement. At the top of the Passo Sella Pantani and Guerini are in front by a huge gap, with 1'30" over Gonzales and 2' over Tonkov and Miceli. Behind Zülle,Clavero,Garzelli, Conti (three Pantani's teammates!), Piepoli and Rubiera at 4'30"! On the descent nothing changes much, besides that Tonkov drops Miceli (who is overtaken also by Camenzind) and reaches Gonzales. Guerini wins uncontested, as Pantani was content with the pink jersey. Gonzales and Tonkov at 2'04", Camenzind at 2'18", Miceli at 3'. Zülle's group comes at 4'37".
In the next stage Zülle will try to attack, but will quickly fall behind and end up losing 30' on the way to Montecampione on stage 19. Meanwhile, Pantani and Tonkov will battle each other, with Pantani securing the win on Montecampione and, surprisingly, also in the final ITT. Later in the year he'll win the Tour, making the last Double in history.

Protagonists of the stage:

Marco Pantani and Giuseppe Guerini:
Image

Pavel Tonkov:
Image

Alex Zülle:
Image

Next Stage:

The stage will start in Merano, like stage 10, but this time it'll go to an entirely different direction :p
A race that doesn't give an attacker the chance to finish it off alone is not a race anymore.


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05 Nov 2015 16:06

1994? :D
User avatar Mayomaniac
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Re:

05 Nov 2015 22:35

Mayomaniac wrote:1994? :D

Congratulations! :cool:
A race that doesn't give an attacker the chance to finish it off alone is not a race anymore.


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Re: Race Design Challenge

09 Nov 2015 09:14

100th Giro stage 15: Merano - Aprica 195 km

Stage type: High Mountain
Difficulty: *****
Original stage: Giro 1994 stage 15
Climbs: Passo dello Stelvio (Cima Coppi), Passo del Mortirolo (GPM.1), Aprica (GPM.3), Passo di S.Cristina (GPM.2)

Image
Image

Overview:
Easily the queen stage, by modern standards. The only time in history that Stelvio (from Prato) and Mortirolo (from Mazzo) have been raced in the same stage. The next day is NOT a rest day (although it's far easier than this stage), so the riders could keep that in mind... but it would be a waste.

Giro of the stage:
The 1994 Giro route looks totally legit at a first glance. However, a second look will leave you with the feeling of something odd. Starting in Bologna with 2 fractions, a very short road stage in the morning and a prologue afternoon, the race goes south, with an early MTF to Campitello Matese on stage 4, then after reaching its southern point in Caserta it starts going north for good, with an important ITT from Grosseto to Follonica on stage 8. All sensible until stage 9. After that, a 300 km long transfer (with no rest days) would bring the peloton from Pontedera to Marostica, and from there to Austria and the central Alps of the second week. After those, the third week went west, with a mixed ITT to the Passo del Bocco and the final two mountain stages to Les Deux Alpes, in France, and Sestriere... both of them much lighter than the stages in the second week. Years later, the Giro director of the time will admit that the route was that weird only because he changed it overnight, a few days before the official presentation, since the route had been leaked (all of it, profiles included) by Tuttosport (the rival newspaper of Gazzetta) a week before and he didn't want to let them have their win. Originally the route was supposed to go first to France and then to Austria, with no ITT to the Bocco but a MTT to Monte Bondone, and ofc no silly 300km transfer overnight.
At the start of the Giro the main favourite was one only: the winner of 1992 and 1993 editions (both Doubled with the Tour), Miguel Indurain. His main opponents were the Italians Claudio Chiappucci and Gianni Bugno, and two possible Russians outsiders, Pavel Tonkov and the young, surprising LBL winner, Evgenij Berzin.
The prologue was won by the Frenchmen Armand de Las Cuevas, who lost the jersey on the following day to the Italian Moreno Argentin.
At the first GC test, in Campitello Matese, an even more surprising Berzin won, taking the jersey, with Indurain and Bugno arriving in the narrow GC group, a group without Chiappucci, who lost 5 minutes. Chiappucci was looking so bad that day, that his team (Carrera) let the young and promising domestique Marco Pantani to stay in the GC group. And the guy did it, arriving at the top with Indurain and Bugno.
Berzin kept the jersey easily all week, and in the ITT to Follonica won again, against a not-so-good Indurain. He seemed invincible. On stage 14, the first real mountain day, finishing in Merano after the Passo Monte Giovo, the main favourites stared at each other while Pantani attacked near the top, and thanks also to a great descent managed to get his first win.

Stage of the stage:
Even if this is now regarded as one of the best stages ever ridden, today's forum(s) would spend the first 3 hours of the stage complaining about the shameful lack of action. The Stelvio was ridden at an amateurish pace. The slow pace however allowed interesting movements. The Italian Franco Vona broke away alone, and behind him a small group was chasing, including Chiappucci, the Colombian Nelson "Cacaito" Rodriguez and the Italian Wladimir Belli. Such was the situation in Mazzo di Valtellina, the nowadays mythical town where the Mortirolo starts.
Only a few minutes after entering the climb, Pantani attacks. Berzin immediately follows him, as the Italian was starting to be a threat in GC. Also De Las Cuevas follows, while Bugno and Indurain try to react but seem in difficulty. Shortly after, De Las Cuevas blows up, and while Indurain drops Bugno riding tempo, Pantani and Berzin start reeling in the group of Chiappucci. After a few kms, though, Berzin blows up as well, while Pantani reaches a completely crushed Vona to get first to the top. Behind him, Indurain's tempo increases to the point that he reaches and drops Berzin, getting third to the top at 50" (after Rodriguez), with the pink jersey at around 1'30". On the descent Indurain and Rodriguez catch Pantani, and the trio goes well together towards Aprica, arriving at the top with over 2' to Berzin's group (featuring Chiappucci and Belli between others) and 3' to Bugno's group (with Tonkov). Starting the climb to S.Cristina Pantani raises the tempo again, and again he drops quickly Indurain and Rodriguez. Indurain here bonks horribly. Behind him, Chiappucci and Belli attack Berzin, who appears in difficulty as well. The two manage to reach Indurain and Rodriguez, and Chiappucci even manages to break away and go for the second place alone. Berzin suffers but luckily for him Indurain suffers even more.
Pantani arrives in Aprica with 6h 55′ 58", with his former leader Chiappucci 2nd at 2'57"! Belli, Rodriguez and Indurain at 3'30". Berzin arrives at 4'06", keepin the jersey with little more than 1' over Pantani, who was now clear 2nd in GC, with Indurain at 3'. The legend of Il Pirata was born.
Despite Pantani's and Indurain's efforts, Berzin will manage to defend the jersey easily in the third week, even winning the Bocco ITT, and will win the Giro with almost 3' on Pantani and 3'30" on Indurain.
Ironically, even if Pantani's name is tied to the Mortirolo, this was the only time he ever raced it. What's even more ironic is that, the day after Madonna di Campiglio, there was a stage with Mortirolo and S.Cristina (but no Stelvio, with Tonale and Gavia instead) waiting for him.

Protagonists of the stage:

Marco Pantani:
Image

Miguel Indurain and Evgenij Berzin:
Image

Claudio Chiappucci:
Image

Nelson Rodriguez:
Image

Gianni Bugno:

Image

Next stage:
There's still one very very famous stage that I really have to celebrate here in the surroundings. Shouldn't be too hard to guess.
A race that doesn't give an attacker the chance to finish it off alone is not a race anymore.


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09 Nov 2015 11:28

the Bormio blizzard stage?
rghysens
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Re:

09 Nov 2015 11:54

rghysens wrote:the Bormio blizzard stage?

Congratz to you too! :) I have to start dropping harder hints. :p
A race that doesn't give an attacker the chance to finish it off alone is not a race anymore.


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Re: Re:

09 Nov 2015 17:20

Eshnar wrote:
rghysens wrote:the Bormio blizzard stage?

Congratz to you too! :) I have to start dropping harder hints. :p

In this case its really not the hint which made it clear that it will be the bormio blizzard stage. That stage was actually obvious since we knew that stage 15 will be the mortirolo stage from 1994 :D
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Re: Race Design Challenge

10 Nov 2015 09:34

100th Giro stage 16: Chiesa in Valmalenco - Bormio 120 km

Stage type: High Mountain
Difficulty: ****
Original stage: Giro 1988 stage 14
Climbs: Aprica (GPM.2), Passo di Gavia (GPM.1)

Image
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Overview:
The mountain triplet ends with the easiest stage of the lot. Still, a Gavia descent finish isn't a piece of cake.

Giro of the stage:
The 1988 Giro started in Urbino, and ended in Vittorio Veneto after 21 stages (2 of which divided in 2 sectors, and with no rest days), following a clockwise loop. After the prologue in Urbino, the main features were a 40 km TTT to Vieste, the hilly/mountain stages to Campitello Matese, Selvino, Chiesa in Valmalenco, Bormio, Merano 2000, Innsbruck and Borgo Valsugana, before a MTT to the Valico del Vetriolo and a rather underwhelming finale, with a couple of flat stages before the final ITT in Vittorio Veneto.
With the defending champion Stephen Roche not competing due to an injury, the race was considered very open, with lots of possible candidates: Roberto Visentini and Franco Chioccioli were the only two Italian hopes, while the list of strangers was far more impressive: Erik Breukink, Andrew Hampsten, Urs Zimmermann, Pedro Delgado, Jean-François Bernard, Tony Rominger... even Greg Lemond was there, although just coming back from an injury and allegedly not in full shape. As for the stage hunters, Johan Van Der Velde and Moreno Argentin were there, as always.
Bernard won the prologue and wore pink until stage 4, were Massimo Podenzana took it thanks to a breakaway. He kept it for quite a long time, even surviving the first MTF to Campitello Matese, won by Chioccioli. He lost it on the stage to Selvino, won by Hampsten, when Chioccioli himself got the jersey. The following stage, to Chiesa in Valmalenco, was won by Rominger, with Chioccioli keeping the jersey.

Stage of the stage:
Nowadays the Gavia is considered a classic climb, but actually it was previously used only once in the Giro, in 1960. It was a terrible climb for the time standards, not just because of the length, gradient and altitude, but especially because of the fact that it was partially unsurfaced. This was considered a key stage at the start of the Giro, and GC riders were looking forward to it. On the night before the stage it snowed on the Gavia, but the road had been cleared in the morning and after extensive discussions between organizers and team directors it was decided to proceed with the stage as planned.
On the climb to Aprica there is already a good selection in the peloton, but everything comes together pretty quickly, as the weather starts to get worse. It rains now, and the wind is already very cold. Most of the riders wear standard jerseys, a totally insufficient gear for that day. The peloton however reaches Ponte di Legno without big problems and starts climbing the Gavia. Almost immediately Van Der Velde attacks and breaks away alone. The tarmac ends, and the mud replace it. Soon the rain becomes snow, and the snow becomes a full blizzard. At the top there are -5 °C, the wind blows terribly and visibility is almost nil. There are today many reports of this famous stage, but not many of them have any clue of what happened to the race itself from the final 5 kms to the Gavia on. Of course there's no TV signal, the spectators, mechanics and team directors soon become too busy helping the riders to care about the race situation at all. Van Der Velde reaches the top first, that much is known, but he is already risking hypothermia, and the worst is yet to come: the descent. Soon he has to stop and step inside the camper of a spectator to get warm and disappears from the race. Behind him, Hampsten gets the lead. On the descent the spectators he meets are not even sure the race is still on. They are walking in the middle of the road as if they're lost. Hampsten even finds a mechanic lost in the blizzard, wandering with two wheels on his shoulder, swearing at his team director who left him there, apparently. Most of the riders abandon, or step into cars to get warm and continue their descent again. Some of them stop descending a climb a little on the opposite way to feel warm. Hampsten only has one gear available, as his gearbox is frozen, and its a very short gear, so he can keep pedalling during all the descent. The pink jersey, Chioccioli, is totally left on his own, since his admiral is assisting his teammates behind him. At 6 kms to go, somebody unexpectedly overtakes Hampsten: it is Breukink, who goes on and wins the stage, with only 7" over Hampsten. Both of them are in horrible conditions. Hampsten will realize to have won the pink jersey only later, after being in the warm team car for some time. Behind the first two there's the void. the third coming is the Italian Stefano Tomasini, at 4'40". Zimmermann and Chioccioli arrive 6th and 7th, at over 5', with the pink jersey almost unconscious. The attenders have trouble to even get him off the bike, his hands frozen firmly to the handlers. Delgado arrives at 7', Bernard at over 9', Visentini and Rominger at around 30'. Van Der Velde reappears at over 45', he will win the points classification of the Giro, and it will be his last major accomplishment.
Hampsten will defend his jersey from Breukink in the following days, and even win the MTT to Vetriolo. He will become the first non-European winner in the Giro history. Breukink and Zimmermann will complete the podium.

Protagonists of the stage:

Erik Breukink:
Image

Andrew Hampsten:
Image

Johan Van der Velde:
Image

Franco Chioccioli:
Image

Next stage:

The greatest show on earth will move to the west coast! :cool:
...this is too easy... :o
A race that doesn't give an attacker the chance to finish it off alone is not a race anymore.


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User avatar Eshnar
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Re: Race Design Challenge

10 Nov 2015 17:00

Okay, you once wrote that there are 5-6 stages of my life span and if I'm right there have only been 4 so far: 1998 aprica (although I wasnt really alive back then, but I think thats the reason why you wrote 5-6 stages), 2000 abetone, 2009 roma, 2010 montalcino. I hope I didnt forget one.
That would mean that there are probably still 2 stages between 1999 and 2008 to come. I don't know what the stage on the west coast could be, although its probably obvious, so I don't think it is from my life span. The most obvious choices for me would be sestriere (2005) and oropa (1999) but its not the case because Eshnar wrote that I was false with my original prediction which included these years. So I go for Chianale (2003) and one of the other two (sestriere would be better IMO, but I'd expect the famous pinerolo stage too, so I have basically no idea :D )

edit: or is maybe the stage from 1999 the one to rapallo? I don't know how it was but it would explain why I was almost correct with my first prediction, and then just have chianale and pinerolo as the two final mountain stages. Oh and the reason why I think Chianale is because I think Eshnar once wrote that the profile of the stage is one his absolute favorites.
User avatar Gigs_98
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10 Nov 2015 19:17

Very good reasoning. But you're still far off regarding the next stage :p
A race that doesn't give an attacker the chance to finish it off alone is not a race anymore.


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User avatar Eshnar
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10 Nov 2015 21:07

Does the "greatest show" refers by any means to the music festival of San Remo?
Or maybe to the festival of San Remo in the 1974 (?) Giro when Merckx spanked Fuente during a medium mountain stage raced in horrible weather?
rghysens
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Re:

10 Nov 2015 22:01

rghysens wrote:Does the "greatest show" refers by any means to the music festival of San Remo?
Or maybe to the festival of San Remo in the 1974 (?) Giro when Merckx spanked Fuente during a medium mountain stage raced in horrible weather?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=abyW9cpY1b8
I guess that's another point for you :D
A race that doesn't give an attacker the chance to finish it off alone is not a race anymore.


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WARNING: Location says Germany, but I'm Italian...
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