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Tools - Getting Started.

Whether you are wondering how to true a wheel, how to fix that clicking sound or simply maintain your bike for the long haul, the Workshop & Maintenance forum is your one-stop online mechanic shop.

Moderator: Pricey_sky

Re: Re:

17 Sep 2015 22:03

Tricycle Rider wrote:
42x16ss wrote: Another thing I find really handy cabling frames with internal routing is fishing line.
May I ask what model/year you are working on? (I won't even pretend I know anything about the latest carbon fiber stuff.)

I just know with the vintage types you can use the old housing to feed a new cable through, and once you get the new cable through you can replace the housing.

I've found it useful for running cables on electronic groupsets, just to add length to the cable and help pull them through. Your method still works really well for mechanical groupsets.
User avatar 42x16ss
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Re: Re:

19 Sep 2015 03:06

42x16ss wrote:I've found it useful for running cables on electronic groupsets, just to add length to the cable and help pull them through. Your method still works really well for mechanical groupsets.
Yikes, a bit touchy those electronics can be, oui?

I can now (sort of, I think) understand the need for a fishing line to get around them. :cool:
User avatar Tricycle Rider
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21 Sep 2015 23:10

Can't believe I've forgotten to mention this, but...

If you are in the habit of measuring with some sort of a bizarre measuring ruler that is not metric get yourself a metric ruler and learn how to convert.

(I prefer to set my brake pads/true the wheel within 2mm [and that's being a bit generous], if you tell me how to do this in inches I will have no idea what you're talking about.)
User avatar Tricycle Rider
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22 Sep 2015 02:48

metric is the way forward......although many cycle measurements are still quoted in imperial

a set of metric gauges comes in handy
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as does a set of digital verniers
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to "toe-in" your brake pads a small thin cable tie looped around the rear of the pad works nicely
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User avatar JackRabbitSlims
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Re: Re:

22 Sep 2015 02:53

42x16ss wrote:
Tricycle Rider wrote:
42x16ss wrote: Another thing I find really handy cabling frames with internal routing is fishing line.
May I ask what model/year you are working on? (I won't even pretend I know anything about the latest carbon fiber stuff.)

I just know with the vintage types you can use the old housing to feed a new cable through, and once you get the new cable through you can replace the housing.

I've found it useful for running cables on electronic groupsets, just to add length to the cable and help pull them through. Your method still works really well for mechanical groupsets.


if you've got some spare $$ burning a hole in yah back pocket

park tool have an internal cable routing assistance kit
Image
nice little yt clip on how it all works
https://www.youtube.com/watch?t=1&v=bS_lrnnCiAw
User avatar JackRabbitSlims
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Re:

22 Sep 2015 11:14

JackRabbitSlims wrote:push the new pedals & shoes idea to the back burner

and get yourself a workshop stand and some new tools


I disobeyed direct orders :(

But I definitely made the right choice...
Vincenzo Nibali:
"I know how to ride a bike"

Reduce your carbon footprint, ride steel.
User avatar King Boonen
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Re: Re:

22 Sep 2015 20:20

King Boonen wrote:
JackRabbitSlims wrote:push the new pedals & shoes idea to the back burner

and get yourself a workshop stand and some new tools


I disobeyed direct orders :(

But I definitely made the right choice...


what did you end up with?
User avatar JackRabbitSlims
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23 Sep 2015 00:37

I am pretty proud that in 40 years of bike riding I have never taken a bike to the shop. I did used to get my wheels built by a guy with more skill than me, but everything else I have done myself. This is my basic tool kit made up of bits and pieces I have purchased, found along the way. The only additions to this are standard pliers, and scissors. I keep any little bits and pieces from wrecked bits so have a good store of these and just brought a packet of 200 cable ends about 5 years ago which should see me out. I have a cheap workstand which is fine, but I do have a really good work bench and vice which is handy. Main things for me would be a good quality chain breaker, good quality cable cutters, good quality spoke wrench, and 6nm preset torque wrench and the rest you can work out with various bits picked up when you see them, need them. The Silca track pump is worth 10 ****** modern ones and that one is many years old. I have just gotten my first press fit bottom bracket bike so will need to get the tools for that.
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User avatar fatsprintking
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23 Sep 2015 05:26

I hear you on the Silca track pump, had mine since I was a teenager. Just replace the cups and the O-rings in the head every 5-6 years and you're laughing.
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Re: Re:

23 Sep 2015 14:46

JackRabbitSlims wrote:
King Boonen wrote:
JackRabbitSlims wrote:push the new pedals & shoes idea to the back burner

and get yourself a workshop stand and some new tools


I disobeyed direct orders :(

But I definitely made the right choice...


what did you end up with?


Giro Privateers, perfect for touring, road riding on the fixed and some CX and MTB riding I'm going to do. Never tried clipless on the MTB before so going to be interesting. A friend gave me some wide Time pedals for that. I also got some bottom of the range Shimano SPD pedals (M520 maybe..?) as everyone I asked said there was no point going for anything more expensive, especially as I was unsure what pedals to you.Very happy with SPD so far.
Vincenzo Nibali:
"I know how to ride a bike"

Reduce your carbon footprint, ride steel.
User avatar King Boonen
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27 Sep 2015 14:05

Is the air clear?(Of lawyers, I mean.)

Right, so another bunch of tools you may find useful will be found in your basic manicure kit. (I have a whole bunch of them, sometimes I actually use them on my nails.)

Also, there is no shame in wearing prescription (or those awful reading glasses) if you cannot see - trust me, you need to be able to see all the little delicate parts that make your bike work.

And lastly - I totally pride myself in having the world's most complete First Aid kit... **** will inevitably go wrong when you're working on a bike, so, you'll need to be able to patch yourself up without (hopefully) having to call an ambulance.

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User avatar Tricycle Rider
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08 Oct 2015 03:20

only thing I can think of that's not been mentioned before;
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User avatar Archibald
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13 Oct 2015 22:11

yes, an excellent addition!!

lately i've been stripping my drive train (mtb) once a week for a full degrease, clean up and re-install - perhaps a bit of overkill but spring weather here now has brought the full spectrum of conditions

check that chain regularly and if it's worn / stretched, swap it out - running a worn chain will ruin your cassette eventually along with your chain rings

avoid shark fins / shark teeth
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User avatar JackRabbitSlims
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22 Oct 2015 14:31

Just picked up a decent chain tool as I needed a new chain for the fixed gear:

http://www.parktool.com/product/mini-chain-brute-chain-tool-ct-5?category=Chain

This bad boy.
Vincenzo Nibali:
"I know how to ride a bike"

Reduce your carbon footprint, ride steel.
User avatar King Boonen
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Re:

22 Oct 2015 16:44

King Boonen wrote:Just picked up a decent chain tool as I needed a new chain for the fixed gear:

http://www.parktool.com/product/mini-chain-brute-chain-tool-ct-5?category=Chain

This bad boy.


what chain are you running on the SS?

a classic 1/8" ??
User avatar JackRabbitSlims
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Re:

22 Oct 2015 20:22

King Boonen wrote:Just picked up a decent chain tool as I needed a new chain for the fixed gear:

http://www.parktool.com/product/mini-chain-brute-chain-tool-ct-5?category=Chain

This bad boy.
I've got one of those, they work well and they're small enough to fit into your bicycle purse when you're on-the-go.

Think their main advantage is you can replace the pin if it breaks (I have broken the pins on other tools, but they were not replaceable), so that's kinda nice.
User avatar Tricycle Rider
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23 Oct 2015 01:05

Are we allowed to play some music around here?

Because if we are, I'd very much like to play this one:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PppUJ_JGq2U
User avatar Tricycle Rider
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Re: Re:

23 Oct 2015 07:21

JackRabbitSlims wrote:
King Boonen wrote:Just picked up a decent chain tool as I needed a new chain for the fixed gear:

http://www.parktool.com/product/mini-chain-brute-chain-tool-ct-5?category=Chain

This bad boy.


what chain are you running on the SS?

a classic 1/8" ??


3/32". That's what came on the bike and due to the 130BCD it's the rings that are easier to get in a variety of sizes. It also means that spare chains can be used across all my bikes and as I'm planning something next year that will involve changing gear a fair bit there is an added benefit to 3/32" in that I can use reusable power links. Seemed the best option and has worked ok so far. I'm fitting a new chain so will keep an eye on chain stretch as I believe 3/32" chains are more susceptible to it. Is that right?
Vincenzo Nibali:
"I know how to ride a bike"

Reduce your carbon footprint, ride steel.
User avatar King Boonen
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Posts: 6,471
Joined: 25 Jul 2012 14:38

Re: Re:

23 Oct 2015 10:08

Tricycle Rider wrote:
King Boonen wrote:Just picked up a decent chain tool as I needed a new chain for the fixed gear:

http://www.parktool.com/product/mini-chain-brute-chain-tool-ct-5?category=Chain

This bad boy.
I've got one of those, they work well and they're small enough to fit into your bicycle purse when you're on-the-go.

Think their main advantage is you can replace the pin if it breaks (I have broken the pins on other tools, but they were not replaceable), so that's kinda nice.


I didn't know you could get replacement pins, thanks for letting me know, I'm not surprised with Park Tools. I bought it for the size too, being able to carry it does help when touring, but mainly I bought it because it's a Park Tool so I knew it would be much better quality than the other one the guy had in. Fitted a new chain to the fixed wheel this morning as the old one was so stretched it wouldn't mesh with the new chainring and it performed brilliantly.

Also, after buying new shoes and pedals I didn't want JackRabbitSlims to shout at me for buying inferior tools! ;)
Vincenzo Nibali:
"I know how to ride a bike"

Reduce your carbon footprint, ride steel.
User avatar King Boonen
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Posts: 6,471
Joined: 25 Jul 2012 14:38

Re: Re:

23 Oct 2015 16:52

King Boonen wrote:
JackRabbitSlims wrote:
King Boonen wrote:Just picked up a decent chain tool as I needed a new chain for the fixed gear:

http://www.parktool.com/product/mini-chain-brute-chain-tool-ct-5?category=Chain

This bad boy.


what chain are you running on the SS?

a classic 1/8" ??


3/32". That's what came on the bike and due to the 130BCD it's the rings that are easier to get in a variety of sizes. It also means that spare chains can be used across all my bikes and as I'm planning something next year that will involve changing gear a fair bit there is an added benefit to 3/32" in that I can use reusable power links. Seemed the best option and has worked ok so far. I'm fitting a new chain so will keep an eye on chain stretch as I believe 3/32" chains are more susceptible to it. Is that right?


I know you know this KB, but just to be clear for others reading: - chains do not stretch.

Chain Wear is attributed to many things such as riding conditions, quality of the chain and materials used, maintenance by the user. In particular to the SS you need to be aware of chain line and chain tension with can both affect the premature wearing of the chain used.

Taken from the Surly site: -

1/2x1/8" chains vs. 1/2x3/32" chains. 1/2x1/8" chains suck. Run whatever you want, but bigger isn't better here. Yeah, they're wider, but according to manufacturer-supplied data, they're not stronger and they are definitely not of better quality. Multi-speed drivetrains is where the bucks are at, and chains that work on such drivetrains are where the manufacturers of chains showcase their innovations and developments in quality. The rollers are better, the plates are better, the pins are stronger, and the construction method (riveting procedure) is better on all multi-speed 3/32" chains.

right now SRAM chains are my least favourite and KMC is on my Bianchi Pista SS Commuter....

generally speaking - your SS chain should get much more "life" than a geared chain. Assuming a good quality product on correct chain line and correct tension that is cleaned often and lubed for the riding conditions.
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