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Tools - The Next Level.

Whether you are wondering how to true a wheel, how to fix that clicking sound or simply maintain your bike for the long haul, the Workshop & Maintenance forum is your one-stop online mechanic shop.

Moderator: Pricey_sky

Tools - The Next Level.

01 Sep 2015 02:02

For more complex repairs and maintenance you will need more specific tools, a well organised workspace and a shop bench. Not absolutely necessary, but the best way to make repairs easier.
These tools can be added to the ones already listed in the "Getting Started" thread.

1) A Portable Work Stand - make sure it's sturdy enough and stable enough to handle it when you have to wail on the wrenches from time to time.
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2) Shop Apron or Overalls - keeping you and your clothes clean and tidy. Also great for keeping your go-to tools on you whilst working.
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3) Hacksaw - with a fine toothed blade.
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4) Shop Knife - or a set of razor blades.
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5) Files - round ones and flat ones with medium to fine teeth.
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6) Cable Cutters - for cutting brake and shifter cables along with the housing. Felco C7 is an excellent tool.
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7) Metric Socket Wrenches - includes 7mm, 8mm, 9mm, 10mm, 13mm, 14mm & 15mm
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8) Crank Puller - for removing crank arms.
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9) Ball-Peen Hammer - Medium.
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10) Cone Spanners.
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11) Bench Vise - bolted to a sturdy bench top.
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12) Cassette - Cog Lockring Tool - for removing cogs / cassettes from the rear hub. Please note, these are brand and model specific.
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13) Chain Whip - for holding cogs while loosening the cassette lockring.
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14) Bottom Bracket Tools - A wide ranging area to cover here. Much has changed in the last 10 years and there are a variety of specific BB tools for each type and specification.
I'll do a separate thread on BB's. Just make sure you have the correct tools for the BB you are dealing with, or head to your local LBS and let them take care of the job if you're not 100% sure.
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15) Slip Joint Pliers
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16) A Bike Specific Torque Wrench -Applying the correct torque to your cycle components is essential for a safe and serviceable bike. An absolute must when working with carbon fibre!
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17) 3 Way Hex Wrench - Certainly not essential, but a handy tool to have. They come in different sizes with Torx options also.
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18) 4th Hand Tool - sometimes referred to as a "cable stretcher" Pulls cables tight for adjustment of derailleurs and brakes. It features one-hand operation with a thumb lock to hold the cable tight while your hand is freed up to tighten pull-up bolts and nuts. Great for cinching up cable ties as well.
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User avatar JackRabbitSlims
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22 Sep 2015 12:16

Is this the right section where we get into truing and dishing the wheel?

I own these two (they're kinda cheap), but because I'm not dealing with professional riders they suit me all right.

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All's I can say is it takes lots of practice to true a wheel (we all have our own hard-earned methods), and when you get too frustrated just walk away from it and try some other time.


(Trust me, it's better to walk away than to snap a spoke.)
User avatar Tricycle Rider
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22 Sep 2015 19:56

i think "the wheel" and all its associated practises perhaps deserves an entire thread of its own?

there is / was a wheel builders thread going for quite some time though

personally, i like to work on wheels when i'm alone
no music no phones no interruptions
User avatar JackRabbitSlims
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22 Sep 2015 22:09

Yeah, there's a wheelbuilders thread in the general section with a lot of great info from BustedKnuckle and Guiseppe Magnetico/RDV4Roubaix. It's been neglected of late though. Time for a revival?
User avatar 42x16ss
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24 Sep 2015 01:55

Apologies, fellow tinkerers, I didn't mean to start a conversation on how to properly true and dish a wheel here.

I just thought this might be the place to show off the tools we use - mine are not expensive or fancy, and I definitely appreciate when someone shows off a tool they had made/designed themselves with whatever materials were available at the time. (That is way beyond cool as far as I'm concerned.)
User avatar Tricycle Rider
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Re:

24 Sep 2015 09:29

Tricycle Rider wrote:Apologies, fellow tinkerers, I didn't mean to start a conversation on how to properly true and dish a wheel here.

I just thought this might be the place to show off the tools we use - mine are not expensive or fancy, and I definitely appreciate when someone shows off a tool they had made/designed themselves with whatever materials were available at the time. (That is way beyond cool as far as I'm concerned.)

No apologies necessary, when you start talking tools, you'll inevitably start talking about using them :D
User avatar 42x16ss
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Re:

17 Oct 2015 12:23

Tricycle Rider wrote:Apologies, fellow tinkerers, I didn't mean to start a conversation on how to properly true and dish a wheel here.

I just thought this might be the place to show off the tools we use - mine are not expensive or fancy, and I definitely appreciate when someone shows off a tool they had made/designed themselves with whatever materials were available at the time. (That is way beyond cool as far as I'm concerned.)
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User avatar Bustedknuckle
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17 Oct 2015 17:11

can i add Roger Musson's "Professional Guide to Wheelbuilding" to the mix.

http://www.wheelpro.co.uk/wheelbuilding/book.php

helps to simplify some of the aspects of wheel building that can give you a real headache when starting out.
User avatar JackRabbitSlims
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18 Oct 2015 19:07

I probably should have read those books before rebuilding this wheel. :o

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It's a cheap rim and a cheap hub on a cheap bike nobody cares about besides me (I call this bike my "Little White Porsche"), so I had nothing to lose.

I did manage to slightly bend one of the spokes while lacing (very simple lacing pattern), surprisingly it hasn't snapped yet.
User avatar Tricycle Rider
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