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Bike repair dispute and advice

Whether you are wondering how to true a wheel, how to fix that clicking sound or simply maintain your bike for the long haul, the Workshop & Maintenance forum is your one-stop online mechanic shop.

Moderator: Pricey_sky

18 May 2017 09:14

£32 is a pretty fair price for a cheap back wheel that'll be fine for commuting. Ask them what size cone spanners you need (it's almost certainly a cup and cone wheel they have ordered), get some good ones from Park Tool and get yourself this grease gun kit:

http://www.chainreactioncycles.com/weldtite-tf2-grease-gun-with-teflon-bike-grease/rp-prod5958 - *other retailers are available*

You don't need to service them often, but if the bike is being ridden in all UK weather every day, flushing out the old grease and replacing it in both hubs every 2-3 months will make them last forever.

If it's a sealed bearing wheel then you can carefully pick off the seals and clean and re-grease if you want to. I don't think it will be though.
Vincenzo Nibali:
"I know how to ride a bike"

Reduce your carbon footprint, ride steel.
User avatar King Boonen
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Posts: 5,791
Joined: 25 Jul 2012 14:38

19 May 2017 14:18

Agreed, KB, £32 is a perfectly reasonable price for a new, not-so-fancy wheel. (Providing it is actually new and is properly lubed.)

Amusing anecdote - I thought there was too much wiggle room in my rear wheel, so got a bit overly enthusiastic with tightening the hub locknut. Well, I tightened it so much the bearings put a hole in the hub, so then there was a question of getting a whole new wheel, or just replacing the hub. (I went with the latter option, wanted the thrills of lacing and rebuilding the wheel.) The wheel has held up fine, but these days I prefer a little wiggle to shredding the hub by over-tightening.

You can learn to do pretty much everything yourself, leeboy, while my bikes were new and came with a 2yr. warranty I just learned to do stuff myself because taking it to a mechanic for each and every little thing was a pain in the ****. The repair is not that difficult, it's learning the bike vocabulary that can be frustrating. But if you have the time and inclination doing your own bike repair can be very rewarding.

PS - Youtube is a great source for DIY bike service/repair tips, and Sheldon Brown is the bike mechanic's bible. http://www.sheldonbrown.com/ :)
User avatar Tricycle Rider
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Posts: 1,471
Joined: 09 Feb 2013 11:12

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