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Race Design Thread

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15 May 2017 12:47

Giro d'Italia stage 15: Termoli - Benevento (156 km)

After the monstrous hill stage, the riders get the third and final rest day of this Giro. This means that all three rest days will be on Mondays, but that shouldn't be a big problem. There is a short transfer (1 hour by car) to Termoli, a city at the Adriatic Sea. The route heads away from the coast directly after the start. From there, the altitude gradually rises to over 800 m with some short downhill sections within. There are three small climbs categorized, all about 4% steep.

After the climb to Taverna Cerrosecco, the terrain is still rolling but the altitude stays more or less the same, being between 600 and 800 meters. The feed zone is in Pesco Farese, in the outskirts of Campobasso. The city is the capital of the province of the same name, within Molise, the second smallest region of Italy (behind Valle d'Aosta). It also hosts the first intermediate sprint of today. The second one is not much further, in Vinchiaturo (I forgot to mark it on the profile).

The roads are mostly flat from here, with one exception, the small climb to Iadanza. The descent is longer than the climb and has some bends, but nothing hard. There seems to be a hill at 11 km to go, but in fact it's only false flat, being less than 3% steep. The finish is in Benevento. This stage can end in a bunch sprint, but there is a chance the sprinters' teams will let a breakaway go.

Climbs:
cat. 3, Larino (4,4 km @ 4,1%)
nc, SS87 #1 (3,0 km @ 4,1%) (at km 32)
nc, SS87 #2 (2,2 km @ 4,0%) (at km 35)
cat. 3, Casacalenda (4,0 km @ 4,0%)
cat. 3, Taverna Cerrosecco (5,7 km @ 4,4%)
cat. 4, Casino Barone (3,1 km @ 5,2%)
nc, Pesco Farese (1,4 km @ 5,3%) (at feed zone)
nc, Sassinoro (1,9 km @ 3,9%) (at km 114)
cat. 4, Iadanza (2,5 km @ 5,2%)
other uphill sections are false flat (<3%)

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anonymous_1
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16 May 2017 16:18

Giro d'Italia stage 16: Benevento - Montecassino (212 km)

After a transitional stage to Benevento, the riders stay there for the start of the next stage. Again, it's a hard one, and they are going back to the North. Yes, the southernmost point of this Giro is further up north than Naples.

There are many climbs today, all of them being cat. 2, but I don't have profiles. The first one comes early, after just about 10 km of racing. It's the climb to Piano di Prata, 12 km long but not steep. It will be the perfect place to form a breakaway, however. (I made a small mistake when tracking the route on this climb, so the stage length on the profile is 1 or 2 km too low.) There is a short hill that could have been cat. 4, but isn't. Right after that, there is an intermediate sprint in Piana di Monte Verna (there is a typo on the profile).

The descent and a flat section take the riders to the third climb of the day. It's a very shallow climb, being only about 4% steep, but it's 14,5 km long. It's the climb of the extinct Roccamonfina' volcano. The descent takes them to Presenzano, where the feed zone is located. The next climb is the steepest one of the day, the Colle Traverso. I used GPSVisualizer to generate a profile, which gives me that the third km (2,0-3,0) is 10% and the fourth km is even 12%, so this climb should shake things up. The final part of the climb is false flat, so the average slope of 6,6% doesn't tell the full story.

After the descent, the riders have a short flat section, including an intermediate sprint in Venafro. In that city the penultimate climb starts, and it's a very irregular one. It's 24 km long at 3,1%, but again, those numbers don't tell everything. The first part is 8,7 km at 5,4%, followed by a brief flat section and a short uphill stretch (about 700 m @ 4%). Then the steepest part follows, being about 7,7% for 2,1 km. Then it's some false flat, followed by an uphill section of 1,8 km at 5,0%. The final uphill stretch is 2,4 km at 5,0%. Note that all of these numbers are roughly estimated, based on a GPSVisualizer profile (except the 24 km @ 3,1% for the whole climb). Overall it's not a hard climb, but the length and irregularity make it quite a challenge.

A descent of about 18 km takes the riders to Cassino, where the final climb of the day starts. It's the only climb used today already known to the Giro: the Montecassino (the only climb today with a profile somewhere on the Internet...). It's not a hard climb (Matthews won the last time it was climbed), but it's the final one. Overall, the thing that most makes this stage hard is the number of climbs.

Climbs:
cat. 2, Piano di Prata (12,4 km @ 4,5%)
cat. 2, Rocchetta (6,9 km @ 6,0%)
cat. 2, Roccamonfina (14,5 km @ 3,8%)
cat. 2, Colle Traverso (5,5 km @ 8,9%)
cat. 2, Acquafondata/Santuario Madonna del Carmine (23,6 km @ 3,3%)
cat. 2, Montecassino (8,5 km @ 5,3%)

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anonymous_1
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17 May 2017 02:58

I would like to ask if there are regulars on this thread who have the skills to take an idea for a stage (maybe two) for the Tour of California which I have saved as a route on MapMyRide under my name and set to "public" under the name Donald Homen. I have a just under 100 mile/165km route for the T.O.C. .... Could add some length if needed.

But as I thought about it route could be extended to make a top shelf UCI World Championship Elite Mens Road race and could be altered to be used for the Women's and under 23 and other Road Races. Also there would also be possible a very scenic and challenging ITT for Elite Mens and Womens ITT and the youth races.

I am able to make the route and added some variants where just the additions are made as a route that would be added to the overall route later. In total I have about 7 or 8 routes with other ideas in my head if the feedback is good.

But the artistic side and computer skills to make a nice route map, profiles and pretty pictures that could be scraped legally from the internet are my weakness.

I have PM-ed the prolific and skilled at this L.S. but have not received any feedback.. may well be to busy and/or uninterested or whatever reason (there is no obligation from anyone to respond to me) but if someone wouldn't mind being a co-author of such an enterprise I would appreciate a PM and any feed back of my Routes.

P.S. I could copy and paste my PM for L.S. to get started.
P.S. The T.O.C route's first few letters for the name are "Pet".
Sandisfan
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17 May 2017 09:07

Vuelta a Espana: Stage 18: Vitoria-Gasteix - Soria, 204 km

Time to finish my Vuelta. It's four stages left, and the race are now leaving Basque country after three stages in that region. The riders head south from Vitoria, and almost immediately starts an uncategorized climb where a breakway is likely to be formed. After a short descent and some "bumpy" terrain, the first categorized climb to Puerto de Herrera starts after 25 km.

This is followed by an long flat section of about 60 km before the riders have reached the Burgos region and the mountain range Sierra de la Demanda. Climbs like Alto Cruz de la Demanda has been used as a MTF several times in the Vuelta, while Lagunas de Neila is used every year in the Vuelta a Burgos. However, this time the are just crossing the eastern part of the Demanda mountains, with the climbs to Hincada after 105 km and Santa Ines after 146 km. After descending from Santa Ines, there is still 50 km flat to the stage finish in Soria, which should give the spinter's teams a certain chance to catch breakaways, but the profile and time of the stage still makes it probably that this will end in a victory for a breakaway rider.

Climbs:
31 km: Puerto de Herrera: 6,7 km, 5,3 %
105 km: Pena Hincada: 9 km, 6,6 %
146 km: Puerto de Santa Ines: 9,6 km, 5,6 %

Profile:
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Map:
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OlavEH
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17 May 2017 09:26

Vuelta a Espana: Stage 19: Soria - Segovia, 198 km

It "classic" transfer stage along the Meseta Central. Quite similar to stage 6 to Albacete with no categorized climbs and endless kms along the dull and brown high plains. The biggest difference is the finish in Segovia. From about 1,5 to 0,5 km from stage finish, there is a 6 % climb. This should make this stage perfect for the sprinter types like Sagan, Matthews, etc. The GC contenders will just sit back and save energy for the next and last mountain stage in the Vuelta.

Profile:
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Climb:
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OlavEH
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17 May 2017 10:23

Vuelta a Espana: Stage 20: Segovia - Bola del Mundo, 176 km

The second last stage of the Vuelta, and the last chance for the GC contenders. The stage takes place in the Sierra de Guadarrama mountains just northwest of Madrid. The riders will have to climb the well-known pass to Puerto de Navacerrada two times, the latter time they will continue to the top of the mountain of Bola Del Mundo just above the Navacerranda pass.

The stage starts in Segovia, and from here it's possible to start the climb to Navacerrada almost immediately. But instead, the race heads northeast to the small town of Navafria where the climb to Puerto de Navafria starts after about 35 km. After descending there is an 15 km fairly flat section before the climbs to Canencia, Morcuera and Cotos in rapid succession. From the top of Cotos there is a few flat kms to the Navacerrada pass where they start the descent south towards the village of Navacerrada.

From there the riders continues south, almost to Collada Villaba, before looping back north towards Navacerrada and this time climbing the mountain from the south side. The climb becomes gradually steeper the entire way. The categorized part of the climb is 15 km, but there is also several kms of false flat before the categorized part starts. First only 2-3 %, then 4-5 % the first couple of kms after passing the village of Navacerrada, before the last 7 km to the pass is 7-9 %. But that's just the warm-up. The last 3,5 km to Bola del Mundo averages over 12 %.
If a rider implodes here, it's quite possible to lose a minute in just a couple of kms.

Climbs:
46 km: Puerto de Navafria: 10,1 km, 5,5 %
79 km: Puerto de Canencia: 4,5 km, 5,8 %
96 km: Puerto de la Morcuere: 9,3 km, 6,8 %
126 km: Puerto de Cotos: 12,9 km, 5,1 %
176 km: Bola del Mundo: 16 km, 7,1 %

Profile:
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Map:
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OlavEH
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17 May 2017 10:37

Vuelta a Espana: Stage 21: Avila - Madrid, 139 km

The last stage of the Vuelta, and it's a traditional sprinter's stage with several finishing laps in Madrid. The stage starts in Avila and the route heads over the uncategorized climb of Alto de Valdelavia after 18 km. The only categorized climb starts after 47 km, and after that the last two thirds of the stage is downhill and flat. The riders reach Madrid just before 120 km, and do three laps in the city centre before the final sprint.

Climbs:
53 km: Puerto de la Paradilla: 6,1 km, 5,5 %

Profile:
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Map:
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OlavEH
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17 May 2017 13:27

Giro d'Italia stage 17: Cassino - Rieti (187 km)

After a difficult multi-climb stage, the riders have an easier day. The start is in Cassino, at the foot of the Montecassino where the previous stage finished. The first climb of the day comes very early, it's the cat. 2 Capo di China. From there, it's flat for a long time, with an intermediate sprint in Sora. The road remains flat until a short hill on the slopes of the Monte Salviano. Right after the descent, there is another intermediate sprint, in Avezzano.

The road remains flat, despite going through an area surrounded by mountains. There is a short cat. 4 hill to Santa Lucia. After the descent, the riders will ride alongside the Lago del Salto. From there, the roads remain completely flat until the finish in Rieti.

This stage should end in a mass sprint, unless something really strange happens. It's the penultimate chance for the sprinters to get a stage win, so they'll probably go for it.

Climbs:
cat. 2, Capo di China (8,0 km @ 5,4%)
cat. 4, Monte Salviano (3,5 km @ 4,2%)
cat. 4, Santa Lucia (3,3 km @ 4,0%)

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anonymous_1
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17 May 2017 18:38

Interested to see what you have in store, Anonymous. Also if there is not a problem for you I may start posting my Giro even as early as today.
Forever The Best
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17 May 2017 18:57

It's no problem. My Giro is almost finished.
anonymous_1
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Re:

17 May 2017 19:15

anonymous_1 wrote:It's no problem. My Giro is almost finished.
Thanks a lot! So here is my first stage:

Giro d' Italia Stage 1 Reggio Calabria-Terme Luigiane 207.2 km Flat with uphill finish
https://www.la-flamme-rouge.eu/maps/viewtrack/hd/120568

The first climb of the day is Barriterri which is 3rd category with 13km at %4 as the climb should form the breakaway. Then after taking some uncategorized hills, with 2.5 km to go the peloton starts to go uphill. They go uphill all the way to the outskirts of Terme Luigiane and have the finish there. This is a lifetime chance for riders like Gilbert to wear the maglia rosa.

KOM SPRINTS:
Barritteri (3rd Category, 540 m, 13.2 Km at 4.0%, Km 43.9)
Terme Luigiane (4th Category, 131 m, 2.4 Km at 5.1%, Arrive)
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18 May 2017 15:19

I forgot to post stage 11. That stage is now added into the post of stage 10.
anonymous_1
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18 May 2017 18:53

Giro d'Italia stage 18: Rieti - Monte Terminillo (ITT) (19 km)

After an easy stage, this is the final high mountain stage. And yes, it's an MTT. The start is in Rieti, where stage 17 finished. The climb to Monte Terminillo aka Sella di Leonessa is very isolated, there are no other hard climbs surrounding it. A climbing time trial is maybe the best way to use it, instead of a _____/ stage.

The finish is on the Monte Terminillo, but not at the highest point of the pass because there's no parking space over there. The final part of the climb won't be really missed, because it's partially false flat. This is the profile, until Campoforogna (5 km from the actual top). As you can see, there are some parts of 8-9% which makes this climb hard. There is a time check at Rosce Caffè, a restaurant located halfway up the climb.

Climbs:
cat. 1, Monte Terminillo (19,5 km @ 6,5%)

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Last edited by anonymous_1 on 20 May 2017 14:15, edited 1 time in total.
anonymous_1
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18 May 2017 21:28

IMPORTANT: The intermediate sprints of stage 1 have been added.
https://www.la-flamme-rouge.eu/maps/viewtrack/hd/120568

Stage 2 Corigliano Calabro-Taranto 188.7 km Flat
A flat stage for the pure sprinters. There are 2 intermediate sprints, in Borgata Marina and in Policoro. The stage is going very near the coast for most of the time so watch out for winds.
https://www.la-flamme-rouge.eu/maps/viewtrack/hd/120570
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Re: Race Design Thread

19 May 2017 16:16

Giro d'Italia stage 19: Terni - San Quirico d'Orcia (179 km)

The penultimate stage starts in Terni, not far from Rieti. Shortly after the start there is an easy hill to San Pellegrino, which could decide the breakaway. The stage remains easy - for now - and goes to Orvieto, a city dating back as far as the Etruscan age. However, the route doesn't go through the old part of the town (located on a volcanic hill) but only through Orvieto Scalo (below the hill). There is an intermediate sprint in Orvieto Scalo, shortly followed by the feed zone in Sferracavallo.

Not long after leaving Orvieto, things start to get interesting. The riders will have to face this. That's right, sterrato. The first section of the day is 6,5 km long and contains a climb within. The climb isn't hard, but the road becomes narrow after a while. The gravel is also rough in some places. The riders that want to win will have to be at the front very early.

After this first section, the riders head to Castel Giorgio but just before entering the town, they take a right turn and enter the second sterrato sector of the day. It's not a hard sector, but the first part is on a narrow road. On the first two sectors, there won't be team cars, just like on many cobble sections in Paris-Roubaix. The sector is 1400 m long. The third sector (1300 m) is almost immediately after it, again not too hard and this time the road is even reasonably wide. It ends on the region border between Umbria and Lazio. Again, it doesn't last long until the next sector. It's just 600 m long, but quite rough and on a narrow road.

After four sectors, the riders get some rest but things should have been shaken up. There is an intermediate sprint in Acquapendente. Then there is a short downhill followed by 10 km of easy flat roads, before they pass through Ponte a Rigo and the roads turn white again.

The longest sector of the day starts, and it's the longest one of the day at 9,5 km. It starts flat but after a few km it goes uphill, although it isn't steep. The gravel isn't rough, but at some places there are stones in the middle of the road. Some pictures: the flat section, the uphill part (2). It's also a part of the Via Francigena, a pilgrim route from Canterbury to Rome (although in the other direction). After the sterrato ends, it's just 1 km to the top of the climb, located within the village of Radicofani.

The riders take a descent to the Formone river, where another climb starts. This time it's on normal asphalted roads. It is on the slopes of the Monte Amiata, but the riders won't go to the top. The first few km are steep, with a 10% section of 2,5 km in length. After passing through Campiglia d'Orcia, the climb gets easier with also a short flat section. The top is located just outside the village of Vivo d'Orcia. One could make the climb a bit harder by taking the road through Belvedere, but it's not a big difference as the hardest part is still before Campiglia d'Orcia.

The downhill doesn't start immediately, but there is 7 km of false flat (with a short actual downhill section in it) first. It's not a difficult descent, but there are some turns. However, what comes next will cause some havoc. The riders take a narrow road onto a short but very steep climb. And after a few hundred meters, it becomes sterrato too. Overall, the climb to Poggioferro is 1,3 km at over 12% average.

The descent is on an asphalted road and not steep, so the sterrato climb to Poggioferro is perfectly usable. The next sterrato section starts with a very short downhill part, but it becomes uphill after a while. It's also steep, the average slope is 9,4%. On the descent the riders pass through Castiglione d'Orcia, but there are also some hairpin bends.

Right after the descent, the final climb and sterrato section starts. It's named after the village of Bagno Vignoni, at the foot of the hill. It's another steep one, being 10% average. The sterrato isn't hard, but it will have an influence. The descent of the Bagno Vignoni climb is also mostly on sterrato, but it doesn't contain any sharp corners so it should be doable. The finish is in San Quirico d'Orcia, just 1 km after the final sterrato section ends.

This stage should create quite some gaps and make the winner of this Giro a very all-around rider. The disadvantage of this stage is that the Giro may be decided by bad luck. However, the riders can adapt to it by choosing the right equipment.

Climbs:
cat. 3, San Pellegrino (3,7 km @ 5,8%)
cat. 3, Citerno (3,6 km @ 7,3%)
cat. 2, Radicofani (8,9 km @ 5,2%)
cat. 2, Vivo d'Orcia (10,9 km @ 4,8%)
cat. 4, Poggioferro (1,3 km @ 12,4%)
cat. 3, Poggio Rosa (2,6 km @ 9,4%)
cat. 3, Bagno Vignoni (2,5 km @ 10,2%)

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Last edited by anonymous_1 on 20 May 2017 14:15, edited 1 time in total.
anonymous_1
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Re: Race Design Thread

19 May 2017 20:05

Nice sterrato stage.
User avatar fauniera
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20 May 2017 10:08

Great stage. Should be awesome to watch. And Vivo d'Orcia is also featured in my Giro :)
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20 May 2017 10:22

Giro d'Italia Stage 3 Monopoli-Potenza 190.2 km Flat
https://www.la-flamme-rouge.eu/maps/viewtrack/hd/120573
KOM SPRINTS:
Miglionico (4th Category, 424 m, 8.3 Km at 3.8%, Km 101.3)
Potenza-Via dei Molinari (4th Category, 796 m, 2.4 Km at 4.6%, Km 184.3).

The 3rd stage of my Il Giro starts from on the coastal city of Monopoli, which has close to 50,000 inhabitants.
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After 20 km, the first intermediate sprint of the day is on Putignano.
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After 75 kms the 2nd intermediate sprint of the day is in Matera, which was the finish of 5th stage of the Giro 2013, where John Degenkolb won.
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The first categorized climb of the day is Miglionico, around 8 kms in a bit less than %4. After the descent of Miglionico, the road starts to go uphill, with very low percentages. With around 8 kms to go we start climbing to Potenza. With 5.9 km to go the 2nd and last categorized climb of the day is crested in the outskirts of Potenza. It is 2.4 kms with 4.6 average gradient. Then after some short descending and climbing parts we finish the stage in Corso Garibaldi after a short descent. This should be a stage for Sagans and Gavirias of this world, and they need to use it properly, because the next 3 days won't be for them.

Potenza:
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