Log in:  

Register

Race Design Thread

A place to discuss all things related to current professional road races. Here, you can also touch on the latest news relating to professional road racing. A doping discussion free forum.

Moderators: Irondan, Eshnar, Red Rick, Valv.Piti, Pricey_sky, Tonton, King Boonen

Re: Race Design Thread

04 Sep 2017 13:40

DACH RUNDFAHRT SUMMARY POST

stage 1: Nürburgring - Nürburgring (166 km)Image

stage 2: Bonn - Dortmund (163 km)Image

stage 3: Wuppertal - Schmallenberg (214 km)Image

stage 4: Marburg - Eisenach (171 km)Image

stage 5: Erfurt - Meerane (168 km)Image

stage 6: Dresden - Dresden (27 km)Image

stage 7: Dresden - Leipzig (124 km)Image

stage 8: Sangerhausen - Brocken (213 km)Image

stage 9: Hildesheim - Lüneburg (236 km)Image

Image

stage 10: Köflach - Koralpe (192 km)Image

stage 11: Klagenfurt - Turracher Höhe (190 km)Image

stage 12: Murau - St. Johann Alpendorf (112 km)Image

stage 13: Zell am See - Landeck (222 km)Image

stage 14: Telfs - Pfänder (217 km)Image

stage 15: Dornbirn - Schoppernau (133 km)Image

Image

stage 16: Lindau - St. Gallen (44 km)Image

stage 17: Rapperswil-Jona - Grindelwald (198 km)Image

stage 18: Interlaken - Sarnen (114 km)Image

stage 19: Luzern - Bern (208 km)Image

stage 20: Bern - Solothurn (191 km)Image

stage 21: Basel - Basel (96 km)Image

stage categories:
-7 high mountain stages
-5 medium mountain stages
-7 flat stages
-2 individual time trials

climbs:
4th category:
0-0-8-2-1-1-0-1-0-0-1-1-0-0-2-0-0-0-3-1-0 --> 21 cat. 4 climbs
3rd category:
8-0-3-1-0-1-0-5-0-0-0-0-1-2-1-1-0-1-1-1-0 --> 26 cat. 3 climbs
2nd category:
0-0-0-0-0-0-0-1-0-2-0-1-0-1-0-0-0-2-0-2-0 --> 9 cat. 2 climbs
1st category:
0-0-0-0-0-0-0-0-0-0-4-0-0-3-4-0-0-0-0-4-0 --> 15 cat. 1 climbs
HC:
0-0-0-0-0-0-0-0-0-3-0-0-0-0-0-0-3-1-0-0-0 --> 7 HC climbs

distance:
3.399 km total distance
3.328 km road stages
71 km ITT

-162 km average distance per stage
-175 km average road stage distance
-35.5 km average ITT distance

uphill top finishes
-Brocken - 2nd category - stage 8
-Koralpe - HC - stage 10
-Turracher Höhe - 1st category - stage 11
-St. Johann Alpendorf - 4th category - stage12
-Pfänder - 1st category - stage 14
User avatar Gigs_98
Veteran
 
Posts: 5,029
Joined: 18 Feb 2015 18:36
Location: Austria

Re: Race Design Thread

04 Sep 2017 22:00

Time for the queen stage in the Lowlands.

Stage 6: Eupen - La Roche-en-Ardenne, 176km

Image

Image

GPM:
Col du Maquisard (cat.2) 2,9km @ 5,0%
Côte de la Vecquée (cat.2) 2,4km @ 5,6%
Côte de Xhierfomont (cat.2) 2,9km @ 5,8%
Les Deux Bierleux (cat.3) 1,1km @ 10,6%
Col de Rideux (cat.3) 1,3km @ 9,3%
Côte de Beffe (cat.2) 1,6km @ 9,0%
Côte de Dochamps (cat.2) 4,7km @ 4,6%
Côte de Poteau (cat.1) 9,2km @ 3,2%
Côte de Cielle (cat.3) 1,3km @ 4.3%
Col d'Haussire (cat.1) 3,9km @ 7,0%
Côte de Cielle (cat.3) 1,3km @ 4.3%
Col d'Haussire (cat.1) 3,9km @ 7,0%
Côte de Cielle (cat.3) 1,3km @ 4.3%
Col d'Haussire (cat.1) 3,9km @ 7,0%
Côte de Cielle (cat.3) 1,3km @ 4.3%

Of course, you'll all be aware that Belgium is a pluricentric country, which has multiple linguistic and cultural identities within its borders. The traditional outside view of the country is that it is a straight dichotomy between the Flemings in the north, speaking Flemish/Nederlands and the Walloons in the south, speaking Walloon/French. There are, however, multiple other identities, as in any multi-racial, multi-ethnic 21st society, but we do often overlook the German part of Belgium, which is over to the East, close to the tri-state border with the Netherlands and Germany, and stretches in pockets down to the Luxembourg border too. Anybody who has been to this part of Belgium will have noted the easy and comfortable ties to the bigger, wider German lands to the east, but for much of Belgium the gateway to Germany is to travel eastward, through Liège to the small town of Welkenraedt, from which regular trains through to Aachen run, arranged by the Euregio that connects the whole region around this multinational border - linking Aachen, Maastricht, Hasselt (in Flanders) and Liège (in Wallonie). The de facto of this German-speaking corner of Belgium, much of which was conferred to the Belgians in the Treaty of Versailles after World War I, is the city of Eupen, a city of around 20.000 people 15km from the German border. Officially in the Verviers arrondissement, it therefore lies within Wallonia, but with 90% of the population having German as its first language, signage is duo-lingual, with both French and German noted everywhere you go.

Image

The city periodically hosts racing, with almost all of the notable stage races in the region having paid a visit in recent history. Most recently, Aleksandr Kolobnev won a punchy stage in the Tour de Wallonie in Eupen in 2013, while the Ronde van België has finished in the city twice since 2000 - firstly in 2004 with Björn Leukemans winning, and then again in 2011 where Leukemans was part of the decisive group of four that fought out the win, however was unable to seal the deal because, well, it was 2011, so Philippe Gilbert won because of course he did. For its part, the Eneco Tour, the race that I am aping even if its name has changed, rolled on into town in 2007, when despite it being stage 1, the most decisive road stage of the race took place with Nick Nuyens winning ahead of Thomas Dekker, José Iván Gutiérrez and David Millar, along with the Lotto duo of Jürgen van den Broeck and Leif Hoste just behind (yes, Lotto had two guys in the group and ended with 5th and 6th), setting up the race for the final TT where Guti was able to take the first of his back to back wins in the race.

One of the first things we do in the stage is to ride up towards the Baraque de la Gileppe, near Jalhay. Climbing from the edge of the lake up to the village of Jalhay is a climb that in the earlier stages would have been categorized, with GPM points at a premium, but is not a significant one in this queen stage. It serves as an annual finish in the Ster-Sponsor-Tour (ZLM, Elektro, whatever) and is generally the most selective of the race (previous winners include Zé Gonçalves, Philippe Gilbert (three times), Enrico Gasparotto and Jens Voigt) but often not enough to depose the sprinters from the GC lead.

Image

In fact, the rolling terrain continues with another uncategorized climb leading us into the well-known city of Spa. Named, as you might guess, because it was a town of invigorating baths in ancient times, we are deep into the territory of Liège-Bastogne-Liège, La Doyenne, the old lady of the Ardennes. Sitting between several of the most famous climbs of the region (most notably the Rosier of course), it is an annual presence in the oldest Monument, and was also elevated to Tour infamy after the 2010 stage when Fabian Cancellara neutralized the péloton after his teammates crashed due to oil on the road during one of the most interesting week 1 stages in years. Instead, we had to wait until Sheffield four years later to get an actually interesting road stage in the first three days of the Grande Boucle. It's also an odd town in that two of its most famous international symbols are not actually from Spa - firstly, the motor racing Circuit de Spa-Francorchamps, which is actually around the hamlet of Francorchamps and loops around to neighbouring villages Malmedy and Stavelot (and previously Masta on the old version of the course), and secondly, the detective Hercule Poirot, who is from Spa, but who crucially doesn't actually exist.

The one well-known LBL climb that we are going to use in this stage is the Col du Maquisard, which is just under 3km in length and averages 5%. It isn't especially steep or threatening and usually serves as a leg-tenderizer between the longer Col du Rosier, perhaps the most sustained length of any LBL climb at difficulty, and the likes of Mont-Theux and the Côte de La Redoute. This leads almost directly into the second half of the northern (easier) side of the lengthy Côte de la Vecquée, usually used as a substitute for the Rosier when road conditions or repairs make it inaccessible for the péloton in late April. And yes, I've labelled Spa in the wrong place on the profile, that's my error as where Spa is marked should be Stoumont.

Image

By now we are deep into the classic terrain with which we associate the Ardennes; lush green forests, verdant valleys and scenery. The next climb of the day is the Côte de Xhierfomont, which ramps up the difficulty slightly, but also adds a few scenic switchbacks for good measure to add a bit of Alpine flavour to its punchy length of 3km at just under 6%, with some sustained ramps of 10-11%. A very fast descent leads us to a misleadingly lower-categorized climb, Les Deux Bierleux, which is the shortest categorized climb of the day but also has the steepest average gradient, at a punishing 10,6%. It gets up and over 14% at times and riders will surely not enjoy the grind considering we're still early in the stage here.

A short descent leads to a long but uncategorized drag at 3-4% to Werbemont, because in this stage, even the sections without climbs are far from flat; this one is really going to hurt by the end of the day. A descent on nice wide roads should give the péloton a chance to recoup a bit and manage the break's advantage for a bit, but that's why at the end of it comes another short sharp burst of a climb. After all, the Tour of the Benelux likes to have a bit of a mini-Amstel Gold Race, so why shouldn't it have a bit of a mini-Liège-Bastogne-Liège? The organizers certainly think the same, hence the La Redoute and Houffalize stages of recent years, but my stage is harder than them, mainly as I have more ITT mileage to try to balance (ignore the fact that I designed this stage before the TT, and judged the mileage based on the other stages rather than vice versa). The next climb is the punchy Col de Rideux. I am only climbing the last 1300m of that profile, but it does keep all but that first tough ramp intact in terms of the toughest parts of it. And the stats match up to the Mur de Huy - although in fairness Huy is less consistent and with a steeper maximum. So this won't be easy.

Image

After this the péloton gets the longest break they will have all day - 15km of terrain that is only rolling to undulating, with no sustained climbing and only some false flats and widish roads to deal with. This means that they can get through the feed station without trouble, before the second half of the stage ramps up the challenges.

The first such challenge is the Côte de Beffe, an unrelenting 1600m that average 9% including 400m averaging 12% in the first half. But without any false flats, although the gradient slowly eases out, it never reaches a truly manageable level until the very end; the péloton's pain will be compounded by there not being any descent at all, just a brief plateau before they're climbing again on a less steep but significantly longer grind up to the Côte de Dochamps, on a scenic plateau.

Image

The two-stepped ascent amounts to the final 5km of this profile (which climbs onto the first step of the plateau via a much less challenging route than the Côte de Beffe that we took), so you can see it's not a consistent climb, but there's very little that is an unmanageable gradient; this is more about attrition as climbs of sustained length are not always common in the Benelux, shall we say; there's a good reason they're nicknamed the Low Countries. We then pass Parc Chlorophylle, a recreational forest park and theme park, on the descent before taking on the longest climb of the entire race which ends at the highest point reached in the race too; because of that fact I've given it the highest categorization, rather than because of any specific difficulty; the meagre average gradient of just over 3% hides some tougher ramps, but none more than around 8-9%. Again, this is more about attrition than anything else, and consolidating the advantages that may or may not have been fought out on the tougher climbs like Les Deux Bierleux and the Côte de Beffe.

The riders then have a fairly long, sustained descent, which begins with some very straight false downhill flat and gradually gets steeper and tougher. They will get familiar with part of this as they will be facing the last section of this descent more often, as we now join a circuit of which there will be three and a half laps, around the finishing town of La Roche-en-Ardenne.

Image

La Roche-en-Ardenne is one of a series of beautiful towns set at bends in the rivers in this region, on this occasion the Mourthe, and is one of the most popular tourist towns in the Ardennes because of its idyllic beauty and opportunities for walking and outdoor activities in beautiful countryside and fresh air - over half the municipal area belonging to the town is forest. In 2013 the town hosted the national championships on a hilly course with several laps of a 13,8km circuit to the south and east of the town; in a race seemingly set up for Gilbert, the great mayfly Stijn Devolder popped up out of nowhere to solo to victory a minute ahead of the chasing quartet of Meersman, Leukemans and Vanmarcke, with the race favourite tailing in, along with van Avermaet and van den Broeck, a few seconds behind.

My course is 14,7km long and is significantly more difficult than the 2013 nationals course though - so it's probably a good thing that they only have 3 laps of it rather than the 16 or so they did in that race. Firstly, to get to La Roche-en-Ardenne, rather than head directly into town the riders have to turn right off the La Roche road to climb up a fairly benign ascent to the village of Cielle. It's nothing special, but it will have the opportunity to play a role with the inevitably reduced groups, since it comes with just 4km remaining in the circuit (so we see it at 48,1km, 33,4km, 18,7km, and for the final time with just 4km to the line, inevitably). It's 1300m long and averages a little over 4%; the steepest ramps are only around 8% but it is just the sting in the tail on the circuit really; the main course is elsewhere. The descent is quite narrow and technical so chasing down any attacks made on this climb will be difficult. Once the riders have crossed the finish line for the first time and have 3 laps remaining, however, se armó un zapatiesto, because we're taking on what is considered to be the toughest climb in the Ardennes, the Col d'Haussire. But don't take my word for it - there's even a sign.

Image

In fairness, there are a few different ways to get to the Col d'Haussire, and obviously not all of them are the hardest climb in Belgium. The version typically referenced begins in the high street of La Roche and begins with a narrow, cobbled section called the Côte de Gohette on its two-stepped route (à la the Triple Mur de Monty, another favourite of Belgians seeking out their most brutal walls). This is the profile for that side; however, I am tackling the Sainte-Marguerite side of the climb; this has no cobbles, but still features steep and narrow roads with much less respite in the middle, and keeping the super-steep second half of the climb intact.

Image

As you can see, this is a tough, tough climb, and that it accounts for almost 4km of a sub-15km circuit means it's going to be very selective as there's not much flat. In fact, arguably the longest true flat on the circuit is that kilometre in the middle of the climb, since it consists of 1600m at just under 10%, then a brief respite, then ramping back up with 300m @ 12%, before settling in for a final 900m at between 8 and 9%. The steepest ramps are of 19%, and come at the top of the first of the climb's two steps, and at the bottom of the second step, so both of these are good times to make a move. You can watch the ascent here (part 1 of 2). It's not fun.

The Col d'Haussire is tackled three times, at 39,1km, 24,4km and 9,7km remaining respectively. This should be enough to tempt some moves especially if the punchier or climbier riders have lost time in the rouleur stages in the Netherlands, and because this is the best opportunity for any climbing-adept rider to gain time on those less adept at changing tempo on the climbs, so they'll want to not leave it too late.

After cresting the summit, there's a short and narrow section of descent on the same kind of narrow, forested roads as the climb is on once you get out of the houses, before a sharp left rejoins the earlier course onto the N89, so we follow this until the Côte de Cielle and then the twisty descent back onto the Route de Vecpré that takes us to the finish line. This will be a truly horrible stage to try to control.
User avatar Libertine Seguros
Veteran
 
Posts: 18,920
Joined: 20 Feb 2010 11:54
Location: Land of Saíz

05 Sep 2017 15:53

Add rain to that and you will see the Wellens winning by about 8 minutes and 114 riders abandoning.

edit: also thoroughly enjoyed the DACH
User avatar jsem94
Senior Member
 
Posts: 3,153
Joined: 05 Oct 2010 18:24
Location: Örebro, Sweden

06 Sep 2017 09:30

well tv has to add value to these minor races
User avatar telencefalus
Member
 
Posts: 467
Joined: 03 Sep 2017 18:39

Re: Race Design Thread

06 Sep 2017 19:00

La Vuelta a Espana Stage 15 San Vicente de la Barquera-Collado de Ason 222,7 Km Mountain
https://www.la-flamme-rouge.eu/maps/viewtrack/hd/145456

I spent almost 1 hour writing this but when I posted submit it logged me out so only the profiles of the climbs.

KOM SPRINTS:
Collada de Bielva (3rd Category, 337 m, 3.9 Km at 5.8%, Km 11.9)
Cueva el Soplao (2nd Category, 519 m, 7.0 Km at 6.2%, Km 24.9)
Collada de Carmona (2nd Category, 594 m, 10.1 Km at 4.3%, Km 43.3)
Puerto de Palombera (1st Category, 1254 m, 16.3 Km at 5.0%, Km 76.0)
Alto del Portillon (2nd Category, 563 m, 5.1 Km at 6.2%, Km 126.4)
Puerto de la Braguia (2nd Category, 723 m, 5.7 Km at 6.6%, Km 156.1)
Alto del Caracol (2nd Category, 832 m, 10.7 Km at 5.5%, Km 175.6)
Portillo de la Lunada (1st Category, 1346 m, 13.8 Km at 6.3%, Km 194.4)
Portillo de la Sia (2nd Category, 1221 m, 7.2 Km at 5.8%, Km 213.0).

Collada de Bielva:
Image

Cueva el Soplao:
Image

Carmona:
Image

Palombera (all of it ridden, only the last 16,3 km categorized) :
Image

Alto del Portillon:
Image

Braguia:
Image

Caracol:
Image

Lunada (only the last 13,8 km are ridden) :
Image

La Sia:
Image

After the last climb there are 9,7 kms to the finish most of which (8-9 km) are downhill.
The great thing about that stage is that it is very long, has many climbs, the hardest climb isn't the last climb and the last 4 climbs are perfectly connected to each other and the stage is a descent finish.

San Vicente de la Barquera:
Image

Collado de Ason:
Image
Last edited by Forever The Best on 07 Sep 2017 19:22, edited 1 time in total.
Forever The Best
Member
 
Posts: 1,744
Joined: 15 Apr 2016 16:10

06 Sep 2017 19:08

Fantasy Vuelta a Espana, version 2

I've had this ready for several weeks, but haven't found time to post until now. The version is a mix of well-known climbs and locations for stage finishes and some less-known climbs and MTFs.

First a link to the library post of my first version of the Vuelta

Vuelta version 1

Stage 1: Valencia - Valencia: 21 km ITT

The first stage is one of two ITT in this Vuelta. Both start and finish in Valencia and more or less flat. No obvious obstacles or difficulties. A stage mainly suited the more pure time trialists.

Image
OlavEH
Member
 
Posts: 484
Joined: 19 Oct 2011 06:52

06 Sep 2017 19:40

Vuelta a Espana: Stage 2: Valencia - Cumbre del Sol, 185 km

First murito of this Vuelta. From the start in Valencia, the stage finish at Cumbre del Sol was just to obvious to be ignored. A high MTF like Aitana could also have been a possibility, but I felt that the higher MTFs could wait until later in the Vuelta, and a murito was more suitable already on stage two.

From Valencia the route heads south along the Mediterranean coast. There are a couple of categorized climbs along the way, but nothing especially difficult until the hilltop finish to the resort of Cumbre del Sol. Used in the Vuelta first time in 2015, the climb is a typical example of the trend of using "muritos" in the Vuelta. This version won't have nearly as many as the last few years of the Vuelta, but this stage was a good chance to create an early challenge for the GC contenders. The last climb to Cumbre del Sol have sections of nearly 20 % gradient and should create opportunities for the lightweight and more pure climbers after the time trial on stage 1.

Climbs:

100 km: Alto de la Drova: 4,2 km, 5,2 %
169 km: Alto de les Planes: 3,1 km, 4,3 %
185 km: Cumbre del Sol: 4,1 km, 7,7 %

Profile:
Image

Map:
Image
Last edited by OlavEH on 06 Sep 2017 19:52, edited 1 time in total.
OlavEH
Member
 
Posts: 484
Joined: 19 Oct 2011 06:52

06 Sep 2017 19:52

Vuelta a Espana: Stage 3: Benidorm - Murcia, 205 km

Stage 3 continues partially along the coast with a another stage suited for other than the typical sprinters. From the start in Benidorm, the route takes the riders inland in a southwestern direction into more hilly terrain. There is not much flat sections the first 50 km, but not so difficult that there are any categorized climbs until Alto di Tibi which starts after about 60 km.

After Tibi there is a new uncategorized climb, before the riders descend back to the coast through Alicante after about halfway on the stage. From Alicante the route continues along the coast, before they turn southwest towards Murcia. But instead of heading straight to Murcia they loop around doing the climb to Cresto del Gallo, before descending to the stage finish. There is only 12 kms from the top of the climb to the finish, which makes it unlikely that a typical sprinter will win the stage. Some attacks on the descent could also be expected.


Climbs:
67 km: Alto de Tibi: 6,2 km, 6,2 %
193 km: Cresto del Gallo: 4,3 km, 7,1 %


Profile:
Image

Map:
Image
OlavEH
Member
 
Posts: 484
Joined: 19 Oct 2011 06:52

06 Sep 2017 20:06

Vuelta a Espana: Stage 4: Murcia-Lorca: 223 km

One of the longest stages of this Vuelta, this is probably one of the best possible stages for a breakaway win. From the start in Murcia the riders heads southeast back to the coast and pass through Cartegna after about 100 km. The route continues along the coast with a couple of categorized climbs. After almost 180 kms, the route turns in a northeastern direction towards the stage finish in Lorca. On the way to Lorca, there is a long and gentle climb to Puerto de Morata before a 10 km descent and an equally long flat section to the stage finish.

Climbs:
16 km: Alto de Carrascoy: 8,5 km, 3,7 %
79 km: Alto de Portman: 2,6 km, 5,6 %
156 km: Alto de el Cantal: 4,5 km, 5,5 %
199 km: Puerto de Morata: 22,3 km, 3,3 %


Profile:
Image

Map:
Image
OlavEH
Member
 
Posts: 484
Joined: 19 Oct 2011 06:52

06 Sep 2017 20:12

Vuelta a Espana: Stage 5: Lorca - Almeria: 171 km

Finally a stage for the sprinters. From the start in Lorca, the route heads southwest most of the day, along or close to the Mediterranean coast. There are none categorized climbs and very few difficulties on the stage, and this is probably one of the most obvious chances for a mass sprint in this version of the Vuelta.

Profile:
Image

Map:
Image
OlavEH
Member
 
Posts: 484
Joined: 19 Oct 2011 06:52

06 Sep 2017 20:31

Stage 6: Almeria - Haza del Lino, 190 km

The last stage before the first rest day, and it's a tough one! The first high MTF of this Vuelta, and the climb to Haza del Lino is used for the first time since the 1970s. The first 80 kms of the stage is flat before the riders turn away from the coast and northwards into the mountains. The top of the first climb at Venta del Tarugo is reached just after passing 100 kms.

After descending they start the climb to the first passage of Haza del Lino by doing the eastern approach. The nice thing about Haza del Lino is that it has several approaches, making it ideally suited for a double ascent of the climb. After passing the top for the first time, they descend the southwestern side, before climbing it for the second time from the south, possibly the toughest ascent averaging over 7 % for 15 km.

This is probably one of the toughest possible MTFs in Spain and with a very even gradient between 6 and 9 % and none more gentle sections, this will certainly be a real test for the GC contenders and a good opportunity to attack and gain time.

Climbs:
102 km: Alto de Venta del Tarugo: 20,7 km, 4,6 %
148 km: Haza del Lino: 19,2 km, 5,1 %
190 km: Haza del Lino: 16,3 km, 7,4 %

Profile:
Image

Map:
Image

Second ascent of Haza del Lino:

Image
OlavEH
Member
 
Posts: 484
Joined: 19 Oct 2011 06:52

07 Sep 2017 19:08

La Vuelta a Espana Stage 16 Ponferrada-Puebla de Sanabria 186,2 Km Mountain
https://www.la-flamme-rouge.eu/maps/viewtrack/hd/128642

KOM SPRINTS:
Alto de Feinoval/Alto Pedregueira (2nd Category, 914 m, 5.3 Km at 8.7%, Km 37.3)
Biobra (3rd Category, 648 m, 3.6 Km at 5.5%, Km 52.7)
Puerto de Piedrafita (1st Category, 1306 m, 10.1 Km at 8.3%, Km 94.3)
Puerto de las Gobernadas (2nd Category, 1404 m, 8.4 Km at 6.2%, Km 110.4)
Puerto del Carbajal (2nd Category, 1339 m, 7.4 Km at 6.4%, Km 133.7)
El Penon (1st Category, 1834 m, 10.4 Km at 6.3%, Km 156.2).


A dangerous stage rest-day. Not a very hard stage since the hardest climbis more than 90 km from the line but if someone wants to do something it can bring big gaps.

The first climb of the day is Alto Pedregueira. 5,02 km at %8,9 and max of %16 it is a 2nd category.
Image

The 2nd climb of the day is Biobra. 3,6 km at %5,5 it is only a 3rd category.

With a bit more than 100 km to go, the 3rd and hardest climb of the day, Collado de Piedrafita starts. 9,8 km at %8,3 with max of %20 it is a very hard 1st category climb.
Image

After a short descent, we have our next climb of the day. Puerto de las Gobernadas. With 8,4 km at %6,2 it is a 2C climb. But the stats don't tell the whole truth since there is a 500m descent part and a 500m flat part.
Piedrafita and Gobernadas in one piece:
Image

After the painful Piedrafita+Gobernadas combo, there are descent and false flat parts (around 16 km in total).

The 5th climb of the day is Puerto del Carbajal. A 2nd category climb with 7,4 km at %6,4 and with the top being crested a bit more than 50 km to go the climb may see some GC action or at least a hard pace.
Image

After a pretty irregular descent we have our final climb of the day, El Penon. 10,4 km at %6,3 it is a 1C climb with the last 4,4 km at %9,9 (and 2 km of %11,65). The maximum gradient is %16 and we should see some attacks on this climb.
El Penon (All of it ridden, only the last 10,4 km categorized) :
Image

After the top of the climb (which is with 30 km to go) we have a little more than 10 km of descent and almost 20 km on lumpy/false-flat terrain.
With the stage being after a rest-day and the following stage being flat this stage can be a crucial day for GC if some GC contender(s) decide(s) to attack.

Ponferrada:
Image

Puebla de Sanabria:
Image
Last edited by Forever The Best on 07 Sep 2017 19:19, edited 1 time in total.
Forever The Best
Member
 
Posts: 1,744
Joined: 15 Apr 2016 16:10

07 Sep 2017 19:15

Vuelta a Espana: Stage 7: Porto - Braga (Mone Sameiro), 133 km

The first rest day is over and the riders have transfered to Portugal where stage 7 starts in Porto. One of the shortest stages in this Vuelta with only 133 km. From the start in Porto, the riders heads northeast towards Braga through a partially hilly terrain. There are two categorized climbs on the way in addition to a couple of uncategorized climbs. Instead of finishing in the city centre of Braga, the riders will have to tackle a final climb to the stage finish at the sanctuary at Monte Sameiro, just east of Braga.


Climbs:
67 km: Puerto Sao Bento: 2,7 km, 6,7 %
113 km: Alto de Feiteiras: 3,6 km, 6,4 %
133 km: Monte Sameiro: 5,1 km, 5,4 %


Profile:
Image

Map:
Image
OlavEH
Member
 
Posts: 484
Joined: 19 Oct 2011 06:52

07 Sep 2017 19:38

Vuelta a Espana: Stage 8: Braga - Vigo, 236 km

None of my stage race designs are complete without at least one long medium mountain stage, and this Vuelta is no exception. This is the longest stage of this Vuelta, and 236 kms in hilly terrain at the portugese and spanish west coast will surely be a real challenge.

From Braga the route zig-zags northeast the first 100 kms with 3 categorized climbs along the way. After passing Venade after 105 km, the longest flat section of the stage follows while the riders heads west passing the spanish border and approaching the Atlantic coast. Just before reaching the coast the climb to Alto de Groba starts. After descending from Groba, the riders are only 15 kms from Vigo, but there is still 65 kms left of the stage. So the route doubles back over Alto de Muros to reach the main difficulty of the stage, the very tough climb to Monte Aloia.

The climb starts just after passing 200 km, and is about 6 kms long at 8 % gradient. The toughest two km stretch is about 9,5 %. This will be a real test after at least 5 hours on the bike. After descending from Aloia, there is still one climb left on the way to Vigo, a 3 km long, 5,5 % climb which peaks after about 225 km. From this point there is a 7 km descent and 4 km flat to the stage finish in Vigo.

Climbs:
50 km: Alto de Armada: 6,7 km, 5,8 %
81 km: Alto de Rendufe: 9,4 km, 5,7 %
106 km: Alto de Venade: 4,3 km, 6,9 %
158 km: Alto de Groba: 10,5 km, 4,8 %
180 km: Alto de os Muros: 5,7 km, 5,3 %
208 km: Monte Aloia: 6 km, 8,1 %


Profile:
Image


Map:
Image
OlavEH
Member
 
Posts: 484
Joined: 19 Oct 2011 06:52

07 Sep 2017 19:39

Legbreaking stage that. Long, difficult. Love it.
User avatar jsem94
Senior Member
 
Posts: 3,153
Joined: 05 Oct 2010 18:24
Location: Örebro, Sweden

07 Sep 2017 19:47

Vuelta a Espana: Stage 9: Pontevedra - La Coruna, 190 km

Finally another stage suited for the sprinters as the route moves north along the Atlantic coast of Spain, to La Coruna. There are no categorized climbs on the stage, but that doesn't mean that this is a flat and easy stage. There are small bumps the entire stage, with the last one being a 2,5 km, 6 % climb which peaks just 13 km before the stage finish. The combination of this and possible side winds from the Atlantic, could make this a more exciting stage than expected after a first glance at the stage profile. Both the sprinters, breakaway specialists and typical puncheurs will be waiting for this stage.

Profile:
Image

Map:
Image
OlavEH
Member
 
Posts: 484
Joined: 19 Oct 2011 06:52

07 Sep 2017 19:49

Very nice stage to Vigo. Monte Aloia <3
Forever The Best
Member
 
Posts: 1,744
Joined: 15 Apr 2016 16:10

07 Sep 2017 19:55

Vuelta a Espana: Stage 10: La Coruna-Lugo, 129 km

If last day's stage to La Coruna suited several types of riders, both breakaway riders and sprinters, this stage will surely favorize the latter. A short and mostly flat stage from La Coruna at the coast and inland to Lugo in the central part of Galicia. This will very likely end in a mass sprint and will probably be a easy and uneventful day for the GC contenders.


Profile:
Image

Map:
Image
OlavEH
Member
 
Posts: 484
Joined: 19 Oct 2011 06:52

07 Sep 2017 20:03

Well, that's the Alto de San Fins rather than all the way to the Monte Aloia summit, but San Fins is where all the best ramps are in the climb anyway.

Frustratingly, I have a Vuelta on the cards in the near future, but have held it off because of the real one taking place, but now we've got quite a high level of traffic on Spanish races...
User avatar Libertine Seguros
Veteran
 
Posts: 18,920
Joined: 20 Feb 2010 11:54
Location: Land of Saíz

07 Sep 2017 20:13

Vuelta a Espana: Stage 11: Lugo - Oviedo, 219 km

Another long and tough medium mountain stage as riders the heads into the hilly terrain around Oviedo. There are 8 categorized climbs and close to 4000 meters of climbing. The climbing starts almost immediately after the start and continues more or less through the entire stage. The longest and toughest climb to Pozo Mujers Muertas peaks after about 85 kms, and is followed by the easiest section of the stage, about 40-45 km of desent and flat.

The last 90 km of the stage are, however, pretty free of longer flat sections. There are four categorized and a couple of uncategorized climbs in this part, the toughest of these peaking with about 55 and 40 kms left of the stage, respectively. The distance from these climbs and the somewhat easier last part of the stage, makes it unlikely that some of the big GC contenders will try any serious attacks, but this should still be an entertaining and action-packed stage.

Climbs:
6 km: Vitalle: 4,8 km, 5,3 %
26 km: Montouto: 4,6 km, 5 %
49 km: Minide: 2,1 km, 8,3 %
85 km: Pozo de las Mujeres Muertas: 10,3 km, 7,3 %
136 km: Llamas del Mouru: 6,9 km, 7,2 %
161 km: Alto del Carricedo: 4,8 km, 7,8 %
175 km: Las Cruces: 4,8 km, 8,8 %
199 km: La Tejera: 4,6 km, 4,4 %

Profile:
Image

Map:
Image
OlavEH
Member
 
Posts: 484
Joined: 19 Oct 2011 06:52

PreviousNext

Return to Professional road racing

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Axel Hangleck, Bing [Bot], Dr. Watson, Google [Bot], Google Adsense [Bot], PunchingRouleur, Richeypen, shalgo, wansteadimp and 48 guests

Back to top