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The Women's Road Racing Thread 2017

A place to discuss all things related to current professional road races. Here, you can also touch on the latest news relating to professional road racing. A doping discussion free forum.

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05 Aug 2017 14:32

Always back Vos from the reduced group is the standing policy, especially when she has no teammates in the group to play one-two with. ELB has to go solo if she wants to win so that will be the acid test of whether the Italians believe in Giorgia. Sheyla is suffering in the cross-winds and has been dropped so she's not a factor anymore. Belgium now riding hard, but that gap is growing up to nearly a minute now with 15k to go.

Edit: 30 seconds with 8km left. Touch and go if they make it, especially as ELB and Olga Z won't want to take it to a sprint so it won't be 6 working cohesively until the last.

Edit: now it certainly won't as Pawlowska has crashed out of the break, which removes an engine that was willing to back the sprint from the group. Not too much impetus in the bunch though, the Dutch setting up an insurance policy in the form of a leadout for Wild, but soft-pedalling while others look at Denmark to do their share, since France and Belgium have spent most of their riders. The Danes have been trying to contribute, but it's still 30 seconds at 3km remaining, only now Vos is outnumbered by the two Italians, and you have two who will gladly sprint - Vos and Bronzini - and two who would prefer not to - Longo Borghini and Zabelinskaya.

Edit: Olga makes the inevitable attack at 1100m, Vos and Bronzini onto her wheel while Elisa sits up. Once more in a big event Zabelinskaya has found a way to secure a medal even when it doesn't suit her at all. It ought to be bronze again, but still, more than most would have anticipated pre-race, myself included. Vos wins the sprint from Bronzini with Olga Z rolling in for bronze, and the spent ELB is smothered by the specialist sprinters in the quest for fourth place.

It would have been disastrous had the insanely over-powered Dutch team not won that, but let's face it, it always helps having Eddy Merckx in the team.
Last edited by Libertine Seguros on 05 Aug 2017 14:54, edited 1 time in total.
User avatar Libertine Seguros
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05 Aug 2017 14:54

Marianne :)
Always a great champion
And a good 4th place for our Roxane Fournier, winner of the sprint behind ;)
Last edited by Guillaume33 on 05 Aug 2017 14:57, edited 1 time in total.
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05 Aug 2017 14:56

1 Marianne Vos (NED)
2 Giorgia Bronzini (ITA)
3 Olga Zabelinskaya (RUS)
4 Roxane Fournier (FRA)
5 Amalie Dideriksen (DEN)
6 Jolien d'Hoore (BEL)
7 Kirsten Wild (NED)
8 Lotta Lepistö (FIN)
User avatar Libertine Seguros
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05 Aug 2017 22:42

Feels like d'Hoore's horrible puncture timing played a factor. Belgium didn't lend a hand until she came back and that was too late to catch the break

Still, at least they managed to avoid a bunch sprint in a region where the lumpiest thing is Bjarne Riis' head.

In the end that sprint was only ever going to have one result, since Bronzini doesn't have the legs she used to have a couple of years ago (and even more so 5 years ago)
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Re: The Women's Road Racing Thread 2017

07 Aug 2017 16:28

I see Lizzie will be riding some of the Revolutions
this winter ... I wonder if this means that she is
contemplating giving the Madison a shot?

The more road super-stars that ride a Madison in
the next couple of years, the more likely it is that
the UCI and IOC will try to accommodate riders that
want to ride both the road and the Madison in 2020.
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11 Aug 2017 21:48

At the weekend we have the Crescent Vårgårda GP, but its regular predecessor, the Vårgårda TTT, took place today, the only such event on the WWT calendar (and unique among World Tour races now that the Eindhoven TTT on the men's side of things has been no more for the last several years). This is the finest TTT challenge, a bit like the Chrono des Nations back in the day; a relatively unchanging course, obviously weather conditions vary but it allows for a fairly reliable year on year comparison and of course doesn't mess up any stage race GC with the TTT obviously favouring over-strength teams.

For many years, of course, the TTT was the specialist preserve of the team which is now Canyon-SRAM; first as HTC and then as Specialized-Lululemon, they were superb at the discipline. That dominance has rather waned somewhat in recent years, with the all-conquering Boels-Dolmans team having such a battalion of strong engines that, once they got their cohesion down pat, they became an unstoppable juggernaut. And a juggernaut they remain; they may have lost two of their strongest time triallists at the end of last season, with Ellen van Dijk moving on and Evelyn Stevens retiring, but when one of the replacements is Anna van der Breggen you don't lose much, especially as the short bursts required in a TTT are well-suited to adaptable power sprinters and rouleurs, and they have a glut of riders in this category, with Christine Majerus and Amalie Dideriksen to call on (Deignan was absent).

Behind them, last year's Cervélo squad managing to force their way onto the podium was seen as a major surprise for the undersized squad crystallized around Moolman-Pasio and Lotta Lepistö. This year, they've strengthened considerably and were considered among the favourites; replicating the podium position was much more understandable with the additions of Cecilie Uttrup Ludwig and Lisa Klein, both of whom are very young but very promising against the clock. And the former monsters of the discipline, Canyon-SRAM, shorn of one of their better TTers in Alena Amialiusik, and with PFP still preferring to race on the dirt, still have more than enough strength in reserve to round out the podium thanks to reliable engines like Cecchini and Brennauer along with improving stars like Hannah Barnes.

They squeezed another pre-race tip, Sunweb, off the podium; having strengthened considerably in the TT department with the signings of van Dijk and Lucinda Brand, they looked strong but lost a lot of time in the second half of the race after being trimmed to the minimum number of riders leaving two of their most inexperienced riders (albeit neither exactly rookies) in the remaining quartet. Wiggle were also below par, mainly thanks to lacking their strongest rider, Elisa Longo Borghini, and with their bare bones lineup set up for the road race on Sunday and little pre-race training in the TTT discipline, their sprinter-heavy lineup could only manage 5th.

The big impressive result this year was probably that of Véloconcept, who beat some more established teams to reach 6th place; with Pernille Mathiesen in some incredible form after her success at the European U23 races, she formed alongside with the veteran TT specialists Amber Neben and Linda Villumsen a powerful trio of riders for the rest of the team to build around, and solid tactics put them ahead of some teams far higher in the WWT pecking order, such as WM3, although it is worth noting that the Dutch team did only start with 5 riders en route to 7th place, and finished with all 5 intact as well - notably Tenniglo and Niewiadoma have been the riders dropped in Rabo TTTs here in previous years.

1 Boels-Dolmans (Anna van der Breggen, Chantal Blaak, Karol-Ann Canuel, Amy Pieters, Christine Majerus, Amalie Dideriksen) 52'39,1
2 Cervélo-Bigla (Ashleigh Moolman-Pasio, Lotta Lepistö, Cecilie Uttrup Ludwig, Lisa Klein, Nicole Hanselmann, Clara Koppenburg) +12,7
3 Canyon-SRAM (Hannah Barnes, Lisa Brennauer, Elena Cecchini, Trixi Worrack, Alexis Ryan, Mieke Kröger) +50,8
4 Sunweb (Leah Kirchmann, Floortje Mackaij, Sabrina Stultiens, Eleonora van Dijk, Lucinda Brand, Liane Lippert) +1'23,4
5 Wiggle-High 5 (Audrey Cordon-Ragot, Jolien d'Hoore, Annette Edmondson, Emilia Fahlin, Giorgia Bronzini, Julie Leth) +2'08,2
6 Véloconcept Women (Linda Villumsen, Sara Penton, Pernille Mathiesen, Amber Neben, Christina Siggaard, Louise Norman Hansen) +2'22,3
7 WM3 Energie (Anouska Koster, Riejanne Markus, Moniek Tenniglo, Anna Plichta, Katarzyna Niewiadoma) +2'25,8
8 FDJ-Nouvelle Aquitaine-Futuroscope (Shara Gillow, Roxane Knetemann, Aude Biannic, Séverine Éraud, Eugénie Duval, Coralie Demay) +2'33,3
9 Hitec Products (Charlotte Becker, Thea Thorsen, Simona Frapporti, Susanne Andersen, Cecilie Gotaas Johnsen, Nina Kessler) +3'05,6
10 BTC City-Ljubljana (Eugenia Bujak, Hanna Nilsson, Corinna Lechner, Polona Batagelj, Urša Pintar, Maaike Boogaard) +3'08,4
11 Australia (Lucy Kennedy, Shannon Malseed, Grace Brown, Louisa Lobings, Alexandra Manly, Jessica Pratt) +3'16,6
12 BePink-Cogeas (Olga Zabelinskaya, Silvia Valsecchi, Ilaria Sanguineti, Katia Ragusa, Alison Jackson, Francesca Pattaro) +3'20,5
13 Cylance (Kirsten Wild, Rossella Ratto, Danielle King, Małgorzata Jasińska, Marta Tagliaferro, Sheyla Gutiérrez Ruíz) +3'24,6
14 Alé-Cipollini (Chloe Hosking, Romy Kasper, Janneke Ensing, Soraya Paladin, Anna Trevisi, Marta Bastianelli) +3'29,3
15 Lotto-Soudal (Élise Delzenne, Annelies Dom, Julie van de Velde, Trine Schmidt, Isabelle Beckers, Chantelle Hoffmann) +4'42,4
16 Drops (Alice Barnes, Anna Christian, Elizabeth Holden, Abby-Mae Parkinson, Hannah Payton, Abigail van Twisk) +4'57,4
17 Lensworld-Kuota (Maria Giulia Confalonieri, Annalisa Cucinotta, Tetyana Riabchenko, Nathalie Verschelden, Kim de Baat) +5'14,0
18 Servetto-Giusta (Anna Potokina, Kseniya Dobrynina, Ana Cristina Sanabria, Antri Christofourou, Alice Gasparini, Jennifer Mariana César) +5'28,5
19 Lares-Waowdeals (Bryony van Velzen, Monique van de Ree, Daniela Reis, Amélie Rivat, Saartje Vandenbroucke, Sarah Inghelbrecht) +5'30,3
20 Norway (Ingrid Mø, Stine Borgli, Malin Eriksen, Line Marie Gulliksen, Julie Solvang, Ingrid Lorvik) +5'36,7
21 Sport Vlaanderen-Guill d'Or (Jessy Druyts, Demmy Druyts, Nathalie Bex, Valérie Demey, Kelly van den Steen, Kelly Druyts) +6'36,5
User avatar Libertine Seguros
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11 Aug 2017 22:05

What does the italiced names mean?
And Sport Vlaanderen essentially broughts the Druyts, only Lenny missing (and Gerry, obviously...)
Aka The Ginger One.
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Re:

11 Aug 2017 22:11

RedheadDane wrote:What does the italiced names mean?
And Sport Vlaanderen essentially broughts the Druyts, only Lenny missing (and Gerry, obviously...)


Dropped riders I'm guessing.

Libertine, I'm confused about the Chrono des Nations reference. Did the women's version ever have a TTT?
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11 Aug 2017 23:24

No, it's just that in the days before the Worlds ITT, the Chrono des Nations gave an excellent year-on-year comparison of riders' progress because of the consistent course; the Vårgårda TTT therefore gives us a better indication of teams' improvement or regression in the format than the Worlds because the latter change each year.

The italicized riders are those that did not finish with the team.
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12 Aug 2017 08:27

Ah, I understand. Thanks
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13 Aug 2017 11:50

GP Vårgårda just finished, have been following the action on Twitter. A sizable group of 11 got away, with most of the major teams having one representative, but nobody outnumbering anybody else, so it became an intriguing game of cat and mouse over the course which is not especially tough but does include a few dirt sections and small hills (profile from Road+Mud).

Image

Once they got onto the smaller circuit, however, the group split in two and left us with a leading quintet of Chantal Blaak, Alexis Ryan, Giorgia Bronzini, Amanda Spratt and Sabrina Stultiens. From those, obviously Bronzini is the strongest sprinter with Blaak the only one who might fancy her chances, so cohesion wasn't great. At 30k to go the péloton caught the remainder of the break. Perhaps the most important name recollected by the group was Cervélo's 21yo prospect Lisa Klein, a very strong engine for this type of race with great TT skills and a fast kick. A high tempo in the group brought the quintet back and simultaneously exploded the bunch in to several pieces on the circuit's climb, with a lead group of 22 getting away and with Jolien d'Hoore being one that missed the selection, the pace was high as nobody fancied sprinting against the Belgian (and with pretty good reason of course). Kirsten Wild was another elite sprinter to miss out, as was defending champion and hometown favourite Emilia Fahlin. Despite the best efforts of Boels-Dolmans and WM3 to keep the pace high, however, there were just too many vested interests behind to allow the gap to snowball, and the first two groups reconvened with 20km remaining. Lots of periodic attacks - the most notable from Sarah Roy, Anna van der Breggen and Susanne Andersen - but none that could gain significant time on the field until they got back round to the climb, when it was Lizzie Deignan that launched, however she is not in the form she had in early 2016 and, though this is the best climbing Lizzie we've probably ever seen, she couldn't make any ground. This did enable Anna VDB to go again when Lizzie was brought back but, once more, she wasn't able to get the required distance. Amy Pieters was the next Boels footsoldier to try her luck, and she was less tightly marked and had more success, but it was only temporary. Guarnier was next as Boels tried to use the advantage of numbers to rid the group of some of the specialist sprinters, not being equipped for that outcome to the same extent as some.

It wasn't just Boels that were attacking though, as Janneke Ensing then pre-empted their next move by going as soon as Guarnier was to be brought back, however it's hard to sneak away when you're wearing a fluoro yellow and orange Alé-Cipollini kit and she was brought back too, as was Amanda Spratt, having been able to recharge after her earlier escape was thwarted. Majerus and Dani King were next as the race came into its last lap, and then finally the elastic snapped when Amy Pieters went again. She has had quite some success at the race, having podiumed before (even though the commentators somehow thought she was Claudia Lichtenberg at the time). However, while an incredibly versatile rider, Pieters is not an elite climber and so her small gap was reduced to nothing when they got to the small climb and an elite climber, Kasia Niewiadoma, went to the front to string the group out. D'Hoore, Wild and the other purer sprinters were suffering, so Kasia was joined at the front by another elite climber, Ash Moolman-Pasio, as the two looked to set this up for their team's sprint options, the more durable Marianne Vos and Lotta Lepistö.

But no sooner had the climbers done their bit than they were back to rouleur terrain, and Ellen van Dijk is one of the toughest of all rouleurs, so when she went nobody wanted to give her any leeway; her wheel was watched like a hawk, and Lizzie Deignan was the first to counter, and was joined by Longo Borghini, Niewiadoma, Cecchini and Sarah Roy, a really great aggressive ride from somebody who might have been expected to wait for the sprint. Cervélo were chasing hard however, so the group was caught, and when Lizzie attacked again it was Floortje Mackaij with her this time as Sunweb looked to poop the former World Champion's party. Nobody wanted to let that duo go, however, but they were powerless to prevent the counter from Anna van der Breggen, who took Amanda Spratt in her wheel with just a couple of kilometres to go and opened up a good sized gap.

But cometh the hour, cometh the woman, and the mightiest turn of the day came from Lisa Klein, the young German national champion on the Cervélo team, whose work on the front to bring back such an elite duo was herculean, succeeding where everybody had failed in the Ardennes in preventing Anna VDB getting a decisive gap in the closing kilometres, before Sunweb started to set their leadout. Cervélo may have burnt one of their best leadout riders by having Klein, who is plenty quick in her own right, take that pull, but without it they wouldn't have been able to sprint for the win. And Lotta Lepistö is versatile enough that she doesn't need too much looking after - with the constant attacking having rid the group of so many of the pure sprinters, the Finnish champion was the one that came through to take the victory ahead of Vos and an almost dead heat between Leah Kirchmann and Christine Majerus, so Boels couldn't quite salvage a podium out of all of their hard work. Lotta won the sprint pretty convincingly and has even been awarded a time gap, although I think that is a bit excessive!

1 Lotta Lepistö (Cervélo-Bigla) FIN
2 Marianne Vos (WM3 Energie) NED +1"
3 Leah Kirchmann (Sunweb) CAN +st
4 Christine Majerus (Boels-Dolmans) LUX +st
5 Eleonora van Dijk (Sunweb) NED +st
6 Chloe Hosking (Alé-Cipollini) AUS +st
7 Marta Bastianelli (Alé-Cipollini) ITA +2"
8 Emilia Fahlin (Wiggle-High5) SWE +st
9 Maria Giulia Confalonieri (Lensworld-Kuota) ITA +st
10 Kirsten Wild (Cylance) NED +st

Wild did a great job with her team to stay in contention but the efforts required to still be in the mix seemed to take the edge off her sprint, while Alé have the problem that Hosking perhaps has the better top end speed than Marta, but Marta is more durable, and here it wasn't really clear who would be the best option when it came to sprinting at the end of a long and hard-fought race. Considering she isn't really renowned for her sprinting and d'Hoore was obviously plan A for the team with Bronzini as a secondary sprinting option, Emilia Fahlin's defence of her surprise victory last season is plenty creditable, while clearly Marianne Vos - freshly shod in her new European Champions' kit - is starting to creep back towards what we know she's capable of, which could be very dangerous indeed come World Championships team because, even if as Ina-Yoko Teutenberg once said, "everything is Vos territory", some courses suit the Cannibal of 's-Hertogenbosch better than others, and Bergen looks like a very favourable course for her...
User avatar Libertine Seguros
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13 Aug 2017 14:52

Nice race. (both profile and how it was raced)
Lepistö has really become much more versatile over the years.
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Re: The Women's Road Racing Thread 2017

14 Aug 2017 15:28

Rumours (on Peter van der Veen’s site) that Jolien might not be at Wiggle in 2018. Not seen anything else about that and it would be a surprise.
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15 Aug 2017 20:33

Watched pretty much the whole race on Swedish Broadcastings on demand service - Emma Johansson was pretty solid as a expert commentator already (she did some 3d wheel commentating with Eurosport already during the TDF), apart from some Norwegianisms. The leadcommentator was a bit more unfocused and derailed som of her lines of thought with own inputs.


The race itself i haven't watched to many times before so maybe I'm not the best to make comaprisson but seemed like this year was more controlled than previous iterations. Maybe a testament to a higher average level of the peloton that nobody escaped this year even though the long breakaway was pretty stacked and the last circuits rolled with punches and counter punches from BD- But as a Finn I was pretty stoked with the end result. :D

PS. The gravelsections were prolly better than some tarmac-sections they've raced on.
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17 Aug 2017 17:00

I appreciate that the Tour of Norway has a livestream, and I do appreciate the commentator's enthusiasm....but a little more knowledge of women's cycling wouldn't go amiss. Perhaps a co-commentator who can help with that.

Never thought I'd hear the words "Marianne Vos of the Veegle-Hi5 team" :lol:
That's going up there with Carlos de Andres' "Chaba Jimenez with Gil y Gil y Gil"
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18 Aug 2017 23:31

Yes, an interesting call there. The Ladies' Tour of Norway is a nice race, well organized, and Halden clearly loves the sport as it held a shortish event prior to this race becoming an international event, let alone World Tour, although it is a bit like the GP Elsy Jacobs with a more or less set parcours, and that means one that doesn't really represent everything that Norway has to offer (how could it?) rather as the men's Tour of Norway does, in all fairness. It fits in well with the earlier tendency of the WWT towards flat to rolling races, but I think that as a comparatively young WT race there's every sense in keeping it around Halden for the time being in order to help the race establish itself before looking further afield for more varied terrain, a bit like the Women's Tour.

Anyway, we've had two stages and two world class winners; firstly a test against the clock won by Ellen van Dijk and then a sprint stage where Jolien d'Hoore, arguably the world's pre-eminent sprinter at the moment, won and was able to use the time bonuses to nudge herself into the overall lead. Some very close times over the prologue, with Vos just 1" behind her compatriot and level on time with both Katrin Garfoot and Lisa Klein, it's a very time compressed field; indeed everybody down as far as Floortje Mackaij in 22nd was in bonus seconds' grasp of the lead. Canyon give a debut to 19-year-old stagiare Christa Riffel here as well, perhaps the highest profile team to take on a stagiare this season, which shows they have quite high hopes for the German.

The first road stage went to a sprint, which was quite inevitable; the field was reduced by around half with just over 60 contesting it, while in the bunch Floortje Mackaij underwent her annual early August crash, which had an air of inevitability about it and I am starting to fear she won't become the powerhouse she threatened to be as she seems to be waylaid by injury too often. Floortje could finish the stage without too much delay however so hopefully all is well. As mentioned, d'Hoore won the stage and took the race lead, finishing ahead of Gracie Elvin and Christine Majerus, who has really been an unsung hero for Boels this year, with Guarnier missing time due to injury and Deignan down on her 2016 monster form for much of the year, meaning they've continued to accumulate results even when the stars are misfiring or simply not firing at all. Another teenager, Elisa Balsamo of Valcar-PBM, was 4th, easily her best result to date at this level and beating a trio of extremely venerated sprinters in Marianne Vos, Chloe Hosking and Kirsten Wild.
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19 Aug 2017 16:34

Stage 2 of the Tour of Norway has just finished. It was a tough, hard-raced stage once they reached the final circuits in Fredrikstad, with some short repechos and a stretch of cobbles on the final 7,5km circuit. With two laps to go, there had been not one but two groups at the head of the field organised, with a leading quartet of Katarzyna Pawlowska (Boels-Dolmans), QOM Rossella Ratto (Cylance), Leah Kirchmann (Sunweb) and Mieke Kröger (Canyon-SRAM) having established a 30" advantage over a chasing quintet which had been formed by the aggresive moves on the uphill sections from Janneke Ensing (Alé-Cipollini), who was joined by Stine Borgli (Norway), Christina Siggaard (Véloconcept), Moniek Tenniglo (WM3) and Clara Koppenburg (Cervélo-Bigla). They in turn established around 15-20" lead over the péloton, and with several of the biggest teams having representation up in the two moves, there were few willing to help Wiggle-High 5 with the chase. Heading towards the final lap, however, it became clear that the Ensing group was not working well together, whereas the leading quartet was rotating the work well, knowing they needed to take it all the way towards the end to have a chance of making it; with Kröger the best placed on GC and both Kirchmann and Pawlowska backing their sprints, only Ratto was a wildcard to escape the group toward the end. Once it was clear that group 2 and group 1 were not going to merge, WM3 and to a lesser extent Cervélo-Bigla joined Wiggle in pacing the péloton, deciding that they had a better chance of a victory enabling Vos or Lepistö to sprint than they did from a secondary break group that wasn't catching the leaders; the quintet were re-absorbed around 6km to go with the gap having held firm at the 30" mark.

Then DISASTER struck for the breakaway, and will have caused massive embarrassment for the organisers. With just 5km remaining, a bridge had to be closed for a passing boat, completely ruining the race, with the bunch rolling up behind the leaders and the péloton having to stand there getting cold for minutes while the bridge was lifted, the boat passed through and the whole thing was just a bit of a disaster. It wasn't even a large or important boat from what I could see, just a fairly small private yacht rolling along its merry way. Emma Johansson was absolutely mortified by it on the commentary.

And with the breakaway's advantage having been reduced down to 20 seconds, having to then set off from a standing start would leave their chances limited. Owen Rogers on commentary pointed out that UCI regulations allow for the race to be neutralised if a level crossing blocks the breakaway, but only if the break has a lead of 30 seconds or over. Obviously the break had slightly less than that, and so they were not afforded that option, so when the barriers came up again, it became open season with the bunch completely together. The women attacking so aggressively at the second the barrier opened meant the motorbikes had real trouble getting through as well, creating a very uncomfortable stretch of racing before it settled down with 4km remaining.

Ellen van Dijk drilled it on the cobbled city sector to try to put a bit of time into a few of the sprinters. A bit of perhaps unnecessary corner cutting and bumping and barging from Kopecky and even more so Majerus as the teams jostled for position in the final kilometre, though Majerus was eventually squeezed out of position by getting caught between Lepistö and Gutiérrez. Van Dijk pulled a bit away from the field as she tried to go for a long one; she didn't quite manage to pull it off, being passed by a very tight duel between Chloe Hosking and Marianne Vos, shoo were split by half a wheel. D'Hoore recovered from the pressure put on by van Dijk to win the sprint just behind the leading trio ahead of Lepistö, but with bonus seconds from the intermediate sprints also to take into account, Vos now assumes the overall race lead.

1 Chloe Hosking (Alé Cipollini) AUS
2 Marianne Vos (WM3 Energie) NED +st
3 Ellen van Dijk (Sunweb) NED +st
4 Jolien d'Hoore (Wiggle-High 5) BEL +st
5 Lotta Lepistö (Cervélo-Bigla) FIN +st
6 Roxane Fournier (FDJ-Nouvelle Aquitaine-Futuroscope '86) FRA +st
7 Tiffany Cromwell (Canyon-SRAM) AUS +st
8 Floortje Mackaij (Sunweb) NED +st
9 Claudia Koster (Team Véloconcept Women) NED +st
10 Alexis Ryan (Canyon-SRAM) USA +st

Rogers still very upset about the boat bridge, and with it being so close to the finish as well. Johansson a bit more philosophical about it now than she was at the time of the actual incident. Chloe Hosking in her interview points out it happens in Paris-Roubaix all the time and is just another factor that has to be taken into account, and it was only right to make it open season when the gate was reopened. Hard to argue - protocol was followed as the gap was only 20 seconds and coming down, and of course Hosking would be in favour as, as a sprinter, it did favour the bunch in that, while WM3 and Wiggle seemed to have the break under control, it did make it certain, but at the same time, it is a problem that a bridge of that kind so close to the finish and in the position that a small single person type yacht requires it to be raised (it wasn't like it was a cruise ship!) can be a part of the circuit as surely they would have been aware of expected timings given that it was on a circuit so the péloton had to take it on several times.

I don't want to bag on the organizers of the race because the Tour of Norway, for all my gripes about the flat to rolling parcours not really being representative and adding another race of similar altimetry to the WWT, has established itself well and organically and though the parcours has been repetitive the towns have embraced the race well and it is quite well supported, and I'm enjoying the stream being available too. However, they will need to learn from this incident as we were robbed of a potentially interesting chase and I wouldn't be surprised if some of the breakaway quartet lost time at the end, having expended a lot of energy on staying away and then having to get back to pace from a cold open amid the péloton with a lot of their impetus having been lost.
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Location: Land of Saíz

20 Aug 2017 20:16

The final stage was the hilliest and saw the race break up with a number of selections being made and giving us a variety of groups on the road. In the front group, several major contenders had been able to make the group, but these did include race leader Marianne Vos, who had her right hand woman Kasia Niewiadoma on hand to help chase down attacks on the hills and return the favour for the work Marianne did for her until her injury in the Women's Tour. Most major teams also had good representation in the group - Boels had Majerus, Blaak and Guarnier, Orica had Elvin, Garfoot and Neylan, Sunweb had van Dijk, Mackaij and the very promising Juliette Labous, Canyon had Ryan and Cromwell, and Cervélo had Klein and Lepistö. Wiggle were slightly underrepresented with only Bronzini making the move, and Alé only had Hosking. A few other in-form riders were foraging alone in the group, such as Lotte Kopecky and Linda Villumsen, so there was a good gap able to be made by the selection.

Quite a few names with potentially significant GC impact were missing from the group too, most notably Jolien d'Hoore, sitting 2nd overall, who was distanced on the climbs and with only Emilia Fahlin for company, plus a lot of hangers-on in the group who had teammates in the front group, such as Dideriksen, Kirchmann, Pawlowska and Ensing, so cohesion in the second group, numbering around 30, was not sufficient to bring back the front group of 20. With WM3 happy to help push the group on to protect Vos' lead, and nobody able to escape the Dutch destroyer's grasp, it came to the reduced sprint of the group across a lumpy closing stretch. As a result the finish didn't favour the pure sprinters and, as yesterday, Ellen van Dijk was up at the business end, but just as yesterday was unable to make it stick, finishing 3rd behind Vos. However, though she made the selection it was not Hosking who was sprinting against Vos at the end but Megan Guarnier, who took the stage win and with the inherent bonuses vaulted up to 2nd place on the GC behind Vos. Again behind Ellen van Dijk came the most elite sprinters of the group, with Lepistö in 4th.

1 Megan Guarnier (Boels-Dolmans) USA
2 Marianne Vos (WM3 Energie) NED +st
3 Eleonora van Dijk (Team Sunweb) NED +st
4 Lotta Lepistö (Cervélo-Bigla) FIN +st
5 Floortje Mackaij (Team Sunweb) NED +st
6 Gracie Elvin (Orica-AIS) AUS +st
7 Giorgia Bronzini (Wiggle-High 5) ITA +st
8 Christine Majerus (Boels-Dolmans) LUX +st
9 Tiffany Cromwell (Canyon-SRAM) AUS +st
10 Demi de Jong (Parkhotel Valkenburg Continental) NED +st

Final GC Tour of Norway:
1 Marianne Vos (WM3 Energie) NED
2 Megan Guarnier (Boels-Dolmans) USA +13"
3 Eleonora van Dijk (Team Sunweb) NED +st
4 Katrin Garfoot (Orica-AIS) AUS +26"
5 Lisa Klein (Cervélo-Bigla) GER +st
6 Chloe Hosking (Alé-Cipollini) AUS +27"
7 Christine Majerus (Boels-Dolmans) LUX +28"
8 Lotta Lepistö (Cervélo-Bigla) FIN +st
9 Juliette Labous (Team Sunweb) FRA +29"
10 Alexis Ryan (Canyon-SRAM) USA +30"

Alice Barnes not racing here in Norway and not scoring in Vårgårda now means that Cecilie Uttrup Ludwig is now unbeatable in the WWT U23 jersey; her lead is now 30 points with only 18 remaining to play for. Klein also wins the maximum U23 points for the race just to underscore Cervélo's excellent ability to pick out the young talents at present.
User avatar Libertine Seguros
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Location: Land of Saíz

23 Aug 2017 17:57

Transfer news now, and Sabrina Stultiens is going to jump back across the Netherlands to WM3 to fill part of the void left by the loss of Niewiadoma. Sabrina's both a strong cyclocross rider and a useful climber who has still plenty of potential; she moved across to Liv-Plantur (now Sunweb) after being lost in the shuffle at Rabobank with so many strong potential leaders in that 2014 team, but has lost over a season due to injuries, and now just as she's finding her feet again she finds herself lost in the shuffle at Sunweb, with the team strengthening with riders like Rivera emerging and last year's Rabobank auction and Boels' top-heaviness meaning strong and established riders like Brand and van Dijk were available in the market; the nature of the team's direction with those leaders is also a bit at odds with her skillset, whereas with WM3 she'll likely get a bit more freedom, especially if Vos starts to get back to her old level, where Sabrina will have the chance to score some victories in the way that Annemiek used to.
User avatar Libertine Seguros
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Location: Land of Saíz

Re: The Women's Road Racing Thread 2017

24 Aug 2017 02:16

Very quick turn around for Letizia Paternoster
who just won silver in the TT and bronze in the
RR at the recent Euro Juniors to help Italy place
first in the qualifying round of the team pursuit at
the World Junior Track Champs by six+ seconds(!)
over NZL. Martina Fidanza who placed fourth in the
RR at the Euro Juniors is also part of the Italian team
pursuit squad at the Championships in Montichiari, Italy
and has already won the Gold in the 7.5 km. scratch race.
User avatar oldcrank
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