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The Women's Road Racing Thread 2019

A place to discuss all things related to current professional road races. Here, you can also touch on the latest news relating to professional road racing. A doping discussion free forum.

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Re:

20 Sep 2018 13:48

Zinoviev Letter wrote:Van dijk to Trek

Trek are starting to look as though they mean business

Ellen Van Dijk
Elizabeth Deignan
Elisa Longo Borghini
Trixi Worrack
Audrey Cordon-Ragot
Ruth Winder
Abi Van Twisk
Tayler Wiles
Lotta Lepistö
Lauretta Hanson
Letizia Paternoster

and the new Trek Factory Racing Cyclocross team with
Ellen Noble
Evie Richards
Emma Swartz
Tim Booth
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Re: Re:

21 Sep 2018 10:35

Tim Booth wrote:
Zinoviev Letter wrote:Van dijk to Trek

Trek are starting to look as though they mean business

Ellen Van Dijk
Elizabeth Deignan
Elisa Longo Borghini
Trixi Worrack
Audrey Cordon-Ragot
Ruth Winder
Abi Van Twisk
Tayler Wiles
Lotta Lepistö
Lauretta Hanson
Letizia Paternoster

and the new Trek Factory Racing Cyclocross team with
Ellen Noble
Evie Richards
Emma Swartz


Fair play to Trek for putting an interesting lineup together, but only EvD is currently ranked inside the top 20. ELB and Lotta don't win that often.

There may be more to come. Someone's got to be in for Lorena Wiebes from Parkhotel, shirley.
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Re: The Women's Road Racing Thread 2018

26 Sep 2018 16:05

In his second season at the head of the continental team, Fundacion Ciclista Euskadi,
http://www.fundacioneuskadi.eus/
Mikel Landa has taken the first steps to put on the road a team of girls for 2019. The new team will consist of about ten runners of all categories, from cadets to sub'23.
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26 Sep 2018 16:19

What's cadets? For those of us who don't speak age-groups.
I know that 'Junior' is under 19, and U23 is - obviously - under 23.
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26 Sep 2018 18:39

Cadets is U16 or U17 depending on how you classify it. As neither Niewiadoma nor Ludwig got to defend their U23 WWT jerseys despite being 22 for the vast majority of the season they defended it, you'd define it as U17, as you become ineligible in the year you turn 17.

Massive congrats to Annemiek on her back to back rainbow jerseys; she's having a real Indian summer and has been the woman to beat in the format for a while now. It's also really nice for the Age of the Mayfly to be demonstrably over; Amber Neben still put in an impressive showing for a 43-year-old for seventh, but she was nearly two minutes adrift of van Vleuten's time despite this effectively being her sole aim for the season - a few years ago we had several riders doing very little road racing, coming in and swooping the gold at the top level at the biggest TT events and then returning to their slumber leaving those who were best all year round with nothing - Neben, Armstrong, Zabelinskaya and Villumsen during the era she was based in the US domestic scene were notable exponents of that approach, as well as Katrin Garfoot more recently too. The North American calendar has always typically been more fertile ground for ITT riders given a relative paucity of long ITTs in the European women's calendar (plenty of prologues and TTTs but not many ITTs of real length), sure, and perhaps it's just that that generation of riders is getting too old to make a decisive contribution at the top anymore, with Thomas and Wiles being the US' other representatives here, but it does look like a shift back toward the all-season riders is now complete.

Nobody profits from that more than the Dutch, of course, and their locking out the podium is pretty spectacular, though also not entirely unpredictable. Van Vleuten, van der Breggen and van Dijk are all names you'd give several stars to in a race preview to draw attention to their medal chances, and their fourth entry, Lucinda Brand, was 6th for good measure. Previously super-strong specialists like Lisa Brennauer were nowhere to be seen, and it seems that the ITT is rather a veteran's discipline - the top 10 averages an age of almost 31, although admittedly Neben skews it slightly upward - in women's cycling, with even those top performers who are the right side of 30 being long, long established names (you'd be forgiven for not realising Elisa Longo Borghini is still only 26, for example); it's only with Georgia Williams (25) and even more so Pernille Mathiesen (21) in 11th and 12th that you start to see riders that you could consider 'prospects'.

A lot of transfer upheaval to deal with too in the last few days.

Firstly, Trek signing Letizia Paternoster is great news for them, a real coup. It also potentially helps her in getting her away from the relatively low budget Italian teams who often struggle to provide promising young riders with the advice and assistance they need, often overworking them or being unable to provide the development opportunities necessary to get the best of them. Alé-Cipollini are becoming a bit of a division-killer in that respect, as the likes of Astana and BePink struggle to compete, let alone the likes of Top Girls-Fassa Bortolo or Giusfredi-Bianchi. Speaking of Alé being a division killer, they've picked up two Italian riders for the coming season, first Nadia Quagliotto from Top Girls-Fassa Bortolo, a versatile rider who has a decent kick, and the Colombian, Diana Carolina Peñuela, from the soon-to-be-defunct United Healthcare, to back up their climbing side with the likes of Ensing. I'm also interested by Trek picking up Anna Plichta from Boels-Dolmans, as I thought BMC-CCC would be a logical place for her to end up, as a Pole who has previous experience working at Vos' team. Canyon might also have been reasonable owing to her personal and racing relationship with Niewiadoma, but slightly less likely as they've got a comparatively full roster already. It also looks like Anouska Koster is leaving Vos' side for the first time, which is unexpected, as she's not in the list of initial signees for the team - though I guess signing Ash Moolman-Pasio mightn't have been so cheap.

Now, Cervélo-Bigla have a big rebuild job to do, losing their two biggest points-scorers in Moolman-Pasio and Lotta Lepistö, and while the team is fully committing to Cille as a star in the making, the young Dane will run the risk of being in the same position - or possibly worse - as Kasia Niewiadoma was with WM3, being depended on big time for results. They are trying to give her support at least in the mountains with the signing of Nosková, but the loss of a sprinter at Lepistö's kind of level to take pressure off her will be felt. The team is looking to bolster itself though, signing Leah Thomas, who's had a very good year both in Europe and the US with UHC and just finished 5th in the ITT World Championships, and also Swiss former slalom canoeist Elise Chabbey. Also a trailrunner, the 25-year-old is an interesting cross-sport prospect as she transitions to a more endurance-based program.

When Hitec were having financial problems mid-season, team head honcho Karl Lima (anybody who has ever tried to follow women's races will know what an important source of information Karl can be) said that they'd managed to get enough to register the team for 2019 but with only the requisite minimum eight riders. As things stand though, they currently have 10 on the books, having been active in the transfer market. They may have lost a lot of their points and experience with Charlotte Becker going to FDJ, but in addition to adding another couple of Norwegian youngsters they've signed a couple of Dutchwomen - Chanella Stougje from Parkhotel Valkenburg and junior talent Lonneke Uneken - along with picking a couple of riders up from other teams going to the wall, with Lucy Garner coming from Wiggle and Marta Tagliaferro from Cylance. Not keeping Kessler may hurt the team, and losing Susanne Andersen to Sunweb definitely will, but it at least has got a decent start to a roster which is a good thing considering we thought they were going to fold.

Cylance folding has been a godsend for Movistar though, since they've been able to hoover up one of the two remaining high level Spaniards they hadn't been able to get their hands on on day one, signing Sheyla Gutiérrez as a result. With a fast finish and good rouleuse capabilities as well as a Giro stage win to her credit, she was always going to be a target, and this now leaves Ane Santesteban very lonely on the startlist of the national championships next year... the Spanish squad has also picked up another sprint contender with Roxane Fournier coming over from FDJ to keep her countrywoman Aude Biannic company. From the Cylance collapse, Rally have been able to pick up Kristabel Doebel-Hickok, one of the stronger climbers in the North American calendar.

And finally, Swapit-Agricolo, the Mexican team which is looking to build a roster to compete in the North American calendar and potentially do a few European races too, has gone on the warpath with Latin American racers, signing Ana Cristina Sanabria, the Colombian who finished top 10 of La Course a couple of years ago on the Col d'Izoard, and the Guatemalan destroyer, Jazmin Soto, as well as, more familiarly, the incredibly experienced Brazilian mercenary Flavia Oliveira, who has hopped around the levels for nearly two decades now, and is still only three years removed from the Giro QOM.
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Re:

26 Sep 2018 19:13

Libertine Seguros wrote:Cadets is U16 or U17 depending on how you classify it. As neither Niewiadoma nor Ludwig got to defend their U23 WWT jerseys despite being 22 for the vast majority of the season they defended it, you'd define it as U17, as you become ineligible in the year you turn 17.


Isn't that how it's always counted. You're too old for - say, U17 - the year you turn 17, no matter if your birthday is January 1, or December 31.
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Re: Re:

26 Sep 2018 19:15

RedheadDane wrote:
Libertine Seguros wrote:Cadets is U16 or U17 depending on how you classify it. As neither Niewiadoma nor Ludwig got to defend their U23 WWT jerseys despite being 22 for the vast majority of the season they defended it, you'd define it as U17, as you become ineligible in the year you turn 17.


Isn't that how it's always counted. You're too old for - say, U17 - the year you turn 17, no matter if your birthday is January 1, or December 31.

Depends on the sport. U21 football, for example, has at times historically had people remain eligible until the end of the season in which they've turned 21.
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Re: Re:

26 Sep 2018 19:18

Libertine Seguros wrote:
RedheadDane wrote:
Libertine Seguros wrote:Cadets is U16 or U17 depending on how you classify it. As neither Niewiadoma nor Ludwig got to defend their U23 WWT jerseys despite being 22 for the vast majority of the season they defended it, you'd define it as U17, as you become ineligible in the year you turn 17.


Isn't that how it's always counted. You're too old for - say, U17 - the year you turn 17, no matter if your birthday is January 1, or December 31.

Depends on the sport. U21 football, for example, has at times historically had people remain eligible until the end of the season in which they've turned 21.


I'm generally thinking in cycling terms here. Just the principle of the thing.
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30 Sep 2018 17:12

Good news from van Vleuten's doctor. She didn't break a kneecap at all, she just microfractured the proximal tibia which is the part that connects tibia to kneecap.

There's very few nerves there which explains why she kept riding and said after the race that she didn't feel any pain at all. The danger of this injury is that, precisely because you feel no pain, you might not realize anything is wrong. In her case it's identified and will heal properly.

No long term worries.
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30 Sep 2018 18:33

Even if she had broken her kneecap I wouldn't be too worried about long-term damage.
A broken back didn't stop her for long!
Or... maybe you were on to something in the World Championship thread, LS. Maybe they replaced her entire skeleton with titanium after her Rio injury. Maybe she's actually a cyborg now! :p
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30 Sep 2018 19:03

Gotta say that course was tailor-made for AVB - When she's in that type of mood she is 'Merckx' like.
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Re:

01 Oct 2018 06:32

GuyIncognito wrote:Good news from van Vleuten's doctor. She didn't break a kneecap at all, she just microfractured the proximal tibia which is the part that connects tibia to kneecap.

There's very few nerves there which explains why she kept riding and said after the race that she didn't feel any pain at all. The danger of this injury is that, precisely because you feel no pain, you might not realize anything is wrong. In her case it's identified and will heal properly.

No long term worries.

read her website - it's not good news
http://www.annemiekvanvleuten.nl/nieuws/rollercoaster-week-in-innsbruck/
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01 Oct 2018 16:57

While it's a somber tone - it did happen to her after all and losing the chance at a worlds course like this one is massive for her - the gist of it seems to be what the doc said: a few weeks of no training with no long term physical damage.
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Re:

01 Oct 2018 20:22

GuyIncognito wrote:While it's a somber tone - it did happen to her after all and losing the chance at a worlds course like this one is massive for her - the gist of it seems to be what the doc said: a few weeks of no training with no long term physical damage.

"According to the doctor, I can only ride my first race in six months''
http://www.ad.nl/wielrennen/van-vleuten-ligt-er-zes-maanden-uit~a42a84fd/
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01 Oct 2018 20:40

Yeah, the news today is very different
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03 Oct 2018 15:33

Jolien D'hoore confirmed for Boels next year. Watch out world... with a top rank sprinter they will fancy winning every race they start.

And OnePro for women is dead already.
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07 Oct 2018 19:33

A bit of late season racing going on in Italy to keep up to speed on; a lot of the big guns have brought their seasons to a halt after Innsbruck, but still a few decent names out there racing.

Firstly, Elena Cecchini took her first national TT jersey, effectively stepping up one from last year's result in the absence of defending champion Elisa Longo Borghini, who is resting post-Worlds. The Canyon rider and multiple former road race champion managed to triumph by a mere 11 seconds over new World Hour Record holder Vittoria Bussi, who became the first woman to top the 48km mark a few weeks ago. The podium was rounded out by Rossella Ratto, but six riders made it within 35", ranging from 19yo neopro Elena Pirrone to established veteran Tatiana Guderzo, who wasn't resting post-Worlds, despite having obviously had a very tough day in Innsbruck to come home with a medal.

In the Giro dell'Emilia, Rasa Leleivyte broke from her tradition of low top 10 types of placements on punchy finales to take the victory; the Lithuanian champion came to the sport as a versatile sprinter, but since returning from her suspension in 2014 has been more suited to punchy terrain, with a number of high profile top 10s, including the GP Plouay, a Giro stage in San Fior, the European Championships in Plumelec, and the Ronde van Vlaanderen. She has been edging forward in the Giro dell'Emilia year by year, 4th in 2015, 2nd in 2017 and now winning in 2018, ahead of two of the sensations of 2017 who have had difficult second years at the top. Arlenis Sierra started the season well but has rather tailed off in the middle of the year, while Cecilie Uttrup Ludwig had health problems in the early season which were thankfully resolved in time for her playgrounds in the mountains in July where she returned to strong performance levels both on the bike and in interviews. The evergreen Guderzo has had a fairly low-key season ending strongly, and finished 4th, the last of their group before a time gap back to Ane Santesteban and a group dominated by the BTC team, with Ursa Pintar, Hanna Nilson and Polona Batagelj all present and correct.

Finally, the GP Bruno Beghelli Donne Elite was an incredibly short, rolling route that took barely 2 hours to complete, and ended with a reduced sprint, which was won impressively by bespectacled 20-year-old sprinter Elisa Balsamo ahead of her highly decorated compatriot Marta Bastianelli and the teenage sensation for Parkhotel, Lorena Wiebes. Finishing 11th in Emilia, Balsamo is clearly more than 'just' a sprinter, but she's very quietly had a very strong season in .1 and .2 races and could well be one for the future.

Although there's a Women's World Tour event in the Tour of GuangXi as a one-day race, it's also true that the season is basically wrapped up for most of the riders now, seeing as for the most part the péloton is based out of Europe. There is the Chrono des Nations next Sunday, but that's all for European road racing this season; the rest of the remaining road calendar for the year is distant races in South America and Asia, and the elites are either resting up now, or setting up their seasons for track or 'cross...
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13 Oct 2018 21:02

Swedish newspaper Dagens Nyheter doing articles on cyclists and eating disorders -

Two important articles on the pressure on cyclists to lose weight and resulting eating disorders & anxiety/angst - Sara Penton's story - her palmares at https://www.procyclingstats.com/rider/sara-penton

https://www.dn.se/sport/jag-kunde-inte-tanka-pa-nagot-annat-an-maten/

Sara Penton's blogg on weight and the rush to super skinny and higher W/kg
https://sarapenton.com/2018/10/04/tva-storlekar-mindre-men-radd-for-en-banan-ett-ganska-viktigt-inlagg/
She went down 7 kg in 6 weeks (!) then the team dietest said she should lose 3 kg more - then common sense said stop.

Olympic MTB champ Jenny Rissveds writes also on the same topic
https://www.dn.se/sport/rissveds-berattar-om-tidigare-atstorningar/

Jenny Rissveds Instagram - in English!
https://www.instagram.com/p/Bowjffmncsx/

If people need help with reading articles/translation, PM me.
Anything about Fran Millar goes in The Clinic.
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13 Oct 2018 21:17

It is a long standing issue that periodically raises its head. It was a large part of Marta Bastianelli's problems, the pressure to diet down and make herself into more of a climber, as a teenage world champion and with Luperini outgoing, the Italians wanted a new Giro contender to get behind and her team and agents pushed Marta to be that person. Mara Abbott is the most famous instance of eating disorders in women's cycling, but it's also worth noting that after many months of radio silence from her side Kseniya Tuhai re-surfaced on instagram last month with a new status line, "ex-pro cyclist, cured of anorexia". I do confess that after her excellent 2016 with her Giro top 10 and strong showings in the mountains in the Ardêche, then not riding until the Emakumeen Bira the following year, being way off the pace and DNFing early on and having a bad case of the 2010 Cobos, I did fear that all was not as it seemed for Kseniya and, given that she was pretty scarily thin even at her peak, I can't say that her admitting to having had problems with anorexia is a revelation that is totally surprising, even if it is somewhat saddening to see her go from the sport so young (she's still just 23), as after her strong 2016 climbing performances I thought she was a strong prospect with a skillset that is often not rewarded enough in women's cycling. However, health must take precedence, and I'd rather see her out of cycling and healthy than still cycling at the expense of her health.
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14 Oct 2018 06:58

The mental effects of eating disorders is part of the problem that does not go away when pro-cyclists stop. It's taken Rissveds two years to come back to the MTB world.
Anything about Fran Millar goes in The Clinic.
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