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Race Design Thread

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Re: Race Design Thread

20 May 2015 19:42

Tour Complet de France n°2, stage 2: Marseille - Orange: 161km, flat (Provence - Alpes - Côte d'Azur)

Like almost al GT's the first stage in line is a flat stage. The official start is at the outskirts of the city that hosted Le Grand Départ a day earlier, after a neutralised start of about 13km.

The organizing committee will seize the opportunity to show some of the touristic sights in the Provence and more precisely in the two départements that host today's stage: Bouches-du-Rhône and Vaucluse.

After some 20km the peloton crosses the center of Aix-en-Provence, the biggest inland city of the Provence. When leaving town, the roads immediately goes upward to the first categorised climb of the day and of this Tour. Being of a wide road a not even 5% average, this rise will pose no problem at all on anyone in the bunch. The course follows the D7n for 30 more kilometers, going through Saint-Cannat and Lambesc before it bridges the Durance river. Next is Cavaillon, a small town at the foot of the Montagne de Lubéron, which on itself will be carefully avoided.
Instead the peloton will head for some of the best known Tour hosting cities: Carpentras. Stages going to or starting from Carpentras often involve the climb to the mythical Géant de Provence, le Mont Ventoux. Not so this time. En route to Malaucène, the beginning of the never used western side of the Ventoux, the course crests the second climb of the day. The Côte du Barroux is rather a long stretch of false flat than a proper climb, however. But it still is the highest point of today's stage. The summit will be followed by almost 40km of false flat descending roads.

Next on the road is almost postcard-perfect Vaison-la-Romaine, a town with a rich Roman and medieval heritage, although a lot of it is in ruins.

When leaving Vaison-la-Romaine the peloton will race along the Ouvèze river for some 25km, until it reaches the D950, the wide road that connects Carpentras with today's finish town: Orange.

Orange is one of those southern French towns with a rich historical past: it was founded by the Romans, as testified by its most famous edifices: the triumphal arch and Roman theater. During the middle ages it was the seat of a small pricipality, among the descendants of the princes are the current Dutch royal family (and that's why the Dutch are clad in anything orange when there's something to celebrate).

The finishline, on the Avenue Maréchal Foch, comes after a last straight line of 2.5km. No doubt the fastest men of the peloton will try to clutch the stage victory, as they won't have that many opportunities the next few days.


Map & Profile:
Image

Climbs:
Côte de Celony: km23.5; 2.8km @ 4.4%; 4th cat
Côte du Barroux: km115; 6km @ 3.3%; 4th cat

Intermediate sprint:
Carpentras, km100
Last edited by rghysens on 21 May 2015 19:16, edited 2 times in total.
rghysens
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Re: Race Design Thread

20 May 2015 20:15

Bilbao - Durango (88km)
This is a very short road stage that is up and down almost all the way, so we should hopefully see an active race. The first few km until the early intermediate sprint in Amorebieta-Etxano is bumpy, but without any longer climbs. It is followed by an unclassified climb of about 2.4km@4.8% and some more varied terrain until a series of 3 classified climbs in the second half of the stage. The first climb to Arieta is rather consistent and steep, but rather short (3km@6.7%, cat4), with the second one to Malats being similar, but a bit longer (3.8km@6.9%,cat3). The final one to Goita is a lot more inconsistent starting at about 4-6% ramping up to a maximum of 11% with the final section having only 4% gradients again (4.2km@5.8%, cat4). After the descent there are about 4km of flats before the finish line.
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User avatar Progsprach
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20 May 2015 20:36

What a bait to go all the way to the foot of Ventoux on a sprint stage :D
Cancellara is like The Black Album. Really good but way overrated.
User avatar Netserk
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20 May 2015 22:15

Progsprach, your unidentified uncategorized climb is Autzagane (3,2km @ 5,0%), often used from the other side in the Klasika Primavera Amorebieta:

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The second categorized climb is Lekoitz-Gane (Gane is the Basque word for a col), 4,4km @ 5,8% but that's not really accurate as from the profile the first 350m or so are downhill:

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The final climb is Trabakua, which is officially about 7,2km @ 4,3% but includes a lot of false flat in that:

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If you wanted to add some bonus pain, instead of Trabakua you could take the narrow Muniozguren, which starts in the same place as Trabakua and is connected to it by 4km of false flat.

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User avatar Libertine Seguros
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Re:

21 May 2015 15:34

I should really start to post some races outside of the well-known regions, so Libertine doesn't already know every single climb. :D
@Libertine Thanks, I didn't actually expect such rather small hills to have a name and cycling history.
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Re: Race Design Thread

21 May 2015 17:22

Deutschland Tour stage 12: Telfs-Speckalm (153 km)
First of all, I am absolutely unsatisfied with this stage. I don't like the long flat section between the Buchener Sattel and the Sudlefeldpass and I don't even know if it is possible to finish a stage at the Speckalm (There is a parking place but I am not sure if it is big enough). However there are two reasons why I created this stage that way.
1. I really like stage 11 and I had an idea for another stage. The problem was that I needed a stage between these two because the distance between the Kühtai and the finish of stage 13 is quite big.
2. I wanted to make another mountain stage because otherwise there would only be 3 real mountain stages in two weeks and that would be really few. Now I had the problem that there aren't so many great passes in the area where this stage had to finish (I could have made a stage in the Allgäu but that wouldn't bring the race closer to the finish of stage 13)
Whatever, I think this stage still has potential and also the most difficult mtf of the race. The route starts in Austria in Telfs. Right after the start the riders climb up the Buchner Sattel. Probably the break of the day will form up on this pass. As I mentioned before, the profile becomes extremely flat now. Only the last about 15 km will be interesting again. First the riders have to climb the Sudelfeldpass, a 3rd category pass, and directly after the descent the final climb to the Speckalm starts. This mtf is only 6 km long but about 10% steep. There would be massive gaps between the gc riders although this climb is only so short. But there would definitely be attacks because although the queen stage comes tomorrow this is the last mtf.
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Telfs:
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Speckalm climb:
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Speckalm (finish)
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climbs:
Buchner Sattel (1st cat.)
Sudelfeldpass (3rd cat.)
Speckalm (1st cat.)
User avatar Gigs_98
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21 May 2015 19:26

I've decided to post my version of the USA Pro Challenge, it's not the best stage race that I've ever designed, but at least it should be a better race than the real one.
I wouldn't like to have too many WT-teams, only Tek, Garmin, BMC and maybe another wt-team, the typical US-teams and Airgas safeway, Funvic and the Colombian Movistar team, so it should be a great show :)
Stage 1 Craig - Kremmling; 242km
The 2nd part of the race:
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I wont post the profile of the first 63,5km from Craig to Steamboat Springs, it's nothing but false flat and you just go from 1800 to 2000m and the rest of the stage never goes under 2000m, so the altitude could be a factor.
Like i said, the first 63,5km are flase flat but from Steambot Springs owards whe have rolling terrain an about 7 short uncategorised climbs, most of them are about 3km long and between 4 and 5% steep, nothing to brag about.
The uncategorised climbs:
km 74,1: 2,35km at 4,9%
km 93,3: 1,5km at 6,7%
km 96,6: 2,8km at 4,5%
km 101,1: 3km at 4,7%
km 142,1: 3.3km at 3,9%
km 185,9: 3km at 4,7%
The first categorised climb is Trough Road, 5,9km at 5,4% after 192,5km and the typical american descent on wide roads followed by 9km of false flat will bring the riders to kremmling for the first time.
7 Km later the next climb starts, 4,2km ar 5,2% and after 4km of false flat we have a short steep climb, 1,5km at 9,2% that ends with 13km to go.
Only the first part of the following descent is steep, the final 9km are more of a false flat and will bring the riders to Kremmling for the 2nd time.
This stage doesn't look that hard on paper, but the long distance and the altitude could do some damage, it should be too hard for most of the sprinters and maybe a strong punchy classics rider with a big engine could attack on the final climb and win the stage.
Kremmling:
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User avatar Mayomaniac
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Re: Race Design Thread

21 May 2015 20:24

Tour Complet de France n°2, stage 3: Carpentras - Alès: 169.5km, hilly (Provence-Alpes-Côte d'Azur - Languedoc-Roussillon)

If anything, the first stages in line of this tour are not exactly prehistoric mammoth stages. For the second consecutive day the stage length barely exceeds that of an average espoir race.

The start will be in Carpentras, the city that hosted yesterday's intermediate sprint. The part of yesterday's course between Cavaillon and Carpentras will be raced again, but in opposite direction and right from the start instead of somewhere midstage.

The peloton will make a large loop south of Avignon and cross the Rhône between Tarascon with its famous castle, and Beaucaire.

Then the course will head north, passing nearby the famous Roman aqueduct Pont du Gard. At that point the peloton will follow the big road to Uzès, where the intermediate sprint will be contested after 103km. From here, it's only 33flat kilometers to the finishline, if you take the shortest way. The peloton, however, won't. Instead of taking the direct, northwestern approach to Alès, it will venture north. First it will climb the rather easy Côte de Larnac after 109km, then from km117 to km142 it will carefully circumvent the Mont Bouquet, one of the highest hills of the region.

The pure sprinters may let a sigh of relief, but that would be quite untimely, because the detour was nothing more than a way to tackle the climb to Le Guidon du Bouquet from its most difficult, western side. The summit is followed by a fast, not too technical, descent on a rather narrow road. A bit after the 20km to go sign the bunch (or more likely: the several groups of the exploded peloton) will join the wide D6 that will lead them to the finish, where a small group with the heads of state, or even a daring and strong attacker will contest the stage victory.

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Alès

Map & profile:
Image

Climbs:
Côte de Larnac: km109; 2.2km @ 5.5%; 4th cat
Mont Bouquet: km145.5; 3.8km @ 9.6%; 560m; 2nd cat (only first 3.8km of the profile, the last few 100meters are a dead end road to a view point)

Intermediate sprint:
Uzès: km 103
Last edited by rghysens on 22 May 2015 06:04, edited 1 time in total.
rghysens
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21 May 2015 20:48

Stage 2 Kremmling - Bear Lake; 160km
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After a unusually long first stage we have short 2nd one that should go to the breakaway.
The first 95km are pretty easy mostly false flat, even if the whole stage takes place at high altitude.
Then the first serious climb of the day starts, Fall River Pass on the Trail Ridge Road, 19km at 19% and the climb finishes 3700m above the sea level, so you really can call this one a cat. 1 climb, even if it's not that steep.
After the 25km long descent the last 11,4km the riders will ride on the Bear Lake Road up to the Bear Lake parking lot. The first 4km are at at 4,3%, the you have a few hundred meters of false flat followed by the final 6,6km at 3,8km, you can't call this one a real uphill finish, it just a slightly uphill and something for the guys with a big engine.
This one really should go to the breakaway, the teams of the gc-riders won't bother to chase the breakaway, they'll try to save their firepower for the next stage, and the stage should be too hard for the sprinters.
We could see a big fight to get in the breakaway and a few attacks form the riders in the breakaway on Fall River Pass to get rid of the faster sprinters in the breakaway, it should be fun to watch.
The finish of the stage:
Image
User avatar Mayomaniac
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Re: Race Design Thread

21 May 2015 22:27

Progsprach - in the Basque Country, nearly every small climb will have SOME cycling history ;)

Il Giro!

Stage 4: Innsbruck - Rifugio Monti Pallidi-Val di Fassa, 194km

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Climbs:
Passo del Brennero (cat.3) 38,6km @ 1,8%
Passo di Valparola (cat.2) 14,3km @ 5,8%
Passo di Fedaia (cat.1) 14,1km @ 7,5%
Rifugio Monti Pallidi (cat.3) 6,2km @ 6,4%

Traguardo Volanti:
Rocca Pietore

The Giro returns to Italy via the Dolomites, which means we more or less have to have a mountain stage, although with this being stage 4, we are not going for the total Zomegnan porn that the region can offer if we really went for it. There's a long-standing tradition in the Giro of having a medium-difficulty first early mountain stage to establish gaps, which at times has led to some more severe climbs early in the race when the stage has been delayed to the second weekend (e.g. 2010 with Monte Terminillo or 2006 with Passo Lanciano). Montevergine di Mercogliano is of course the most famous of these "week one mountains". It's rare to see a week one mountain stage up in the kind of region the queen stages often take place, but it has happened in the past, most recently in the unusual 2009 route, where San Martino di Castrozza and Alpe di Siusi served to open up the GC gaps and sort the contenders from the pretenders.

I'm trying to do so with a much better stage. The final climb is less difficult but is preceded by a classic; however the stage is relatively straightforward for a big Dolomiti stage before that. The stage begins in Innsbruck, another of the Four Hills from the Ski Jumping and the host of the 1964 and 1976 Winter Olympics. As the biggest city in this part of the Tirol, it serves as a good base for a stage heading into Italy via the still mostly Germanophone Südtirol. Our first port of call is to establish a strong break of the day by opening up the stage with the 7km @ 7% that is Patscher Höhe, a narrowish ascent to a popular XC skiing spot and close to the legendary Igls luge/bobsleigh run. Nevertheless, there are no points to be paid here, for it has simply been subsumed into the full 40km length of the busiest pass between Austria and Italy, the legendary Brenner Pass. We are using the old road, so no highway traffic for the Giro péloton, but it will still be a pretty busy sight, this time of riders trying to make good on their escape. Much of the route is flat or false flat, but it slowly ramps up to include some pretty hefty gradients in the last couple of kilometres.

After this, there is a long descent into the beautiful town of Vipiteno-Sterzing, but as with the ascent, not much of this is really what you'd call steep, and it isn't technical either. After this there is a lengthy period of false flat, first downhill then uphill, in the attractive setting of the Val Pusteria.

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The main body of this stage, however, is the final 70km or so. After the riders turn southward once more after the feedzone in Chienes, the wick is slowly turned up on the false flat until it eventually becomes a proper climb - and quite a famous one too, at the highest altitude we will go for some time in the race. The Passo Valparola, at 2192m, is one of the higher climbs in the vicinity, and though it's not that imposing in terms of gradient hence being rated cat.2, the second half of the ascent averages 7,3% so the riders will feel this one, especially early in the race.

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Valparola crests 52km from the finish. After the descent from this, we have the intermediate sprint in Rocca Pietore, and then the first major climb of the Giro arrives where the GC is likely to be impacted. And it is FEDAIA.

FEDAIA!!!!!!!!!

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It is a well known fact that the Serrai di Sottoguda is the best thing to ever happen to cycling and that all races that do not include the Passo di Fedaia could be instantly improved by including the Passo di Fedaia. Since 2011 this piece of epic wonder has not been used and that is too long. It is the greatest climb in world cycling, split equally between jaw-dropping scenery and absurdly tough gradients, and hits the perfect mix of being difficult enough to guarantee action but not being steep enough to become a carnival of pain like Monte Zoncolan or Angliru, allowing genuine tactical racing to break out. Everything is better with Fedaia. And even more so when, after dealing with its cruel collection of hairpins it crests only 19km from the finish, meaning that attacks on the beast, both from the top names looking to put a marker down early in the Giro and secondary or tertiary contenders perhaps looking for a stint in the maglia rosa while the favourites are reluctant to try to take it coast to coast, are very tempting indeed.

After the descent into Canazei, the riders turn to the north for the finale. It is common to see stages with Marmolada finishing on the Passo Pordoi, while 2011's insanely epic queen stage returned to the long forgotten Rifugio Gardeccia climb. Here, we have something slightly different, in that, in order to encourage more action on Fedaia, I've looked for an easier finish, and I've found one. A few kilometres above Canazei, the road to the fabled Passo Pordoi and the road to the slightly less fabled but still highly important in the history of the Giro Passo Sella split. We will be taking the road to the Passo Sella, but only for a kilometre or so before we arrive at the Rifugio Monti Pallidi. From the profile of the Passo Sella you can see the Rifugio - which has ample space to host a bike race - noted just after the 6km marker. You will notice therefore that the climb is shortish, easy at first but ramping up, with the final kilometre at 8,5%. Steep enough to open some small gaps for whatever sized small group comes to the final climb together, but not so steep that it will discourage earlier moves.

This could be a really interesting stage - nay, SHOULD be a really interesting stage, what with the stages before and that this is the biggest GC marker point stage in the first week. And even if it isn't, it has FEDAIA, queen of the Dolomites and most majestic ascent in World cycling. As has been mentioned before, if I have a female child I would consider naming her Fedaia then reject it out of hand as setting impossibly unattainable beauty standards that would lead to crippling self-esteem issues. Because FEDAIA!

Innsbruck:
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Rifugio Monti Pallidi-Val di Fassa:
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User avatar Libertine Seguros
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21 May 2015 22:31

Let's hope the weather is with you :)
Cancellara is like The Black Album. Really good but way overrated.
User avatar Netserk
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21 May 2015 22:38

Ey, it's only a week and a half earlier than they're usually there, and Valparola at 2192m isn't super high. Granted it's a bit higher than they went in 2009 but there wasn't really any issue then. Valparola is also a road that is more likely to get cleared for access than many owing to its comparatively nodal status. Fedaia is less likely to be cleared owing to other, easier passes nearby for the same route, but is also lower (and as far as Malga Ciapela is likely to be cleared anyway).
User avatar Libertine Seguros
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21 May 2015 22:42

I'd like to see them climb Fedaia in the snow already on stage 4 :D (of course we would like to see them climb Fedaia under any circumstances ;) )

But it's all fantasy, so I guess we can imagine the weather to be whatever we please.
Cancellara is like The Black Album. Really good but way overrated.
User avatar Netserk
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Yesterday 06:25

The sprinters are going to love you, heading through the Dolomites pretty early on!
User avatar lemon cheese cake
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Re: Race Design Thread

Yesterday 18:53

Giro della Campania Stage 2 Agropoli - Salerno (106km)

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Climbs:
Arpignano

Primes:
Ponte Barizzo
Battipaglia
Salerno

Feed Zone:
Montecorvino Rovella

With no change of start location from Stage 1, the riders should enjoy another night in the same hotel. Anyway with the first few kms exactly the same, the riders will be familiar with the start. After 22kms the first prime is at Ponte Barizzo. The second is at Battipaglia. Shortly after, there is the climb up to Arpignano. The feed zone is then at [url]Montecorvino Rovella[/url] After a steady descent, they will get to the prime on the circuit in Salerno. At the first crossing of the finish, there is a prime with points and bonuses on offer. Then a lap around the city to finish off.

With it being the only pure sprinters stage, teams that have one will want to control the race. It means a breakaway win is very unlikely.

Start:
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Finish:
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User avatar lemon cheese cake
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