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Race Design Thread

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Re: Race Design Thread

20 Aug 2015 16:26

Londres Paris Stage 5a: 93km Compiègne - Paris

Image

Image

Climbs:
None

Primes:
Saint Witz
Paris Stade France

Feed Zone:
None

For the first part of stage 5 we a have a 93km romp into Paris, with no climbs or feed zones (no feed zones as its so short). This is a stage to get us into the capital of France from where the real racing will take place in the early evening. We have a prime in Saint Witz and another outside the Stade France on the outskirts of Paris. We then have a short ride south to the finish on the Boulevard Barbès below the Montmartre hill.

Compiègne:
Image

Boulavard Barbes:
Image

Londres Paris Stage 5b: 3.2km Paris - Paris

Image

Image

Climbs:
Montmartre

Primes:
None (TT)

Time Split:
Rue Martyrs @ 1.7km

We start on the finish of stage 5b and head north before looping round and heading onto the Boulevard de la Chapelle. They will shortly urn off onto the narrower Rue Martyrs and cross the time split. They will then head up the hill and onto the Rue des abbesses. The road narro narrows again as they head onto the Rue Lepic before they hit the Rue Norvins. They will then head onto the Rue Saint-Eleuthere to finish infront of the Sacré-Cœur.

Sacre Coeur:
Image


The Overall route:


Image

Figures:
TT's: 2
Road Stages: 5
Stages in France: Four
Stages in England: Three
Longest stage: Stage 4 (214.8km)
Shortest Stage: Stage 5b (3.2km)
Shortest Road Stage: Stage 5a (93km)
Stage with most elevation gain: Stage 3 (1523m)
Stage with least amount of elevation gain: Prologue (0m)
User avatar lemon cheese cake
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Re: Race Design Thread

20 Aug 2015 17:24

Climbing Montmartre is a great idea. I like it this way... ;)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Dwjy0qED2Lo

Maybe this is interesting for the race design mafia...

Libros de Ruta Vuelta Ciclista a España 1960 - 2014
Max Rockatansky
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20 Aug 2015 17:38

Is there one of those for the Giro?

By the way, when drawing a Giro route, it is nearly impossible to resist the many hills that pepper Italy.

How the organisers managed to draw a course that allowed Ale-Jet to win 9 stages is unbelievable.
barmaher
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Re: Race Design Thread

20 Aug 2015 17:51

Max Rockatansky wrote:Climbing Montmartre is a great idea. I like it this way... ;)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Dwjy0qED2Lo

Maybe this is interesting for the race design mafia...

Libros de Ruta Vuelta Ciclista a España 1960 - 2014

That is basically what I put for climbing it.
User avatar lemon cheese cake
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Re: Race Design Thread

20 Aug 2015 18:28

lemon cheese cake wrote:
Max Rockatansky wrote:Climbing Montmartre is a great idea. I like it this way... ;)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Dwjy0qED2Lo

Maybe this is interesting for the race design mafia...

Libros de Ruta Vuelta Ciclista a España 1960 - 2014

That is basically what I put for climbing it.

That would be an awesome TT. I really like the whole area from Rue Legendre to Montmartre.
User avatar Mayomaniac
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Re:

21 Aug 2015 07:35

barmaher wrote:Is there one of those for the Giro?

By the way, when drawing a Giro route, it is nearly impossible to resist the many hills that pepper Italy.

How the organisers managed to draw a course that allowed Ale-Jet to win 9 stages is unbelievable.

If you want to see the profiles of the Giro 2004 (when Petacchi won 9 stages) there is the official site still online http://www.gazzetta.it/Speciali/Giroditalia/2004/ita/le_tappe/
Nirvana
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22 Aug 2015 12:24

Stage 7: Hanau - Schlesingen, 226km

Image

Image

GPM:
Hutten (cat.3) 5,6km @ 4,3%
Wasserkuppe (cat.2) 7,9km @ 5,6%
Birxsteig (cat.3) 3,8km @ 6,3%
Hohe Geba (cat.3) 3,9km @ 7,1%
Rohrer Berg (cat.4) 2,6km @ 5,8%
Ruppberg (cat.3) 4,2km @ 5,6%
Grenzadler (cat.3) 4,1km @ 4,5%
Großer Beerberg (Schmücke)(cat.2) 5,8km @ 5,9%

It's the Friday of week 1 in Germany, and it's been a long week, as though without any real serious mountains and under 20km against the clock the riders will have had to be attentive and fight throughout. Clausthal-Zellerfeld has been the only real stage for sprinters, though of course more durable ones could contest the Lüneburger Heide stage. There have been two cobbled stages, plus two different hilly stages which use their weapons in different ways. Now we move back east with another difficult intermediate stage which is tailor-made for a breakaway and will be a struggle for teams to control.

After the connection to the Brothers Grimm in the Winterberg stage, starting in Göttingen and going through Kassel, stage 7 continues the link to the legendary scholars, writers and archivists, who were born in Hanau, a town just to the east of the Frankfurt am Main conurbation. Like yesterday's stage finish the city is on the Rhein-Main-Verkehr local network so access will be easy for fans throughout the region. The first part of the stage, traversing eastern Hesse, is fairly straightforward, with only one fairly inconsequential climb in the first third of the stage. The first real test is Wasserkuppe, the highest peak in the Rhön mountains, popular with gliders and light aircraft and also with a small skiing area. The climb is a solid cat.2 with the last 4km averaging just under 8%; the record for many years was held by local rider Patrik Sinkewitz. Shortly after this we cross over into Thüringen via the climb into the village of Birx; I have erroneously labelled it "Birxsteig" by dint of association with the infamous climb at the Oberhof biathlon venue.

After this, you know what you're getting with the Thüringer Wald - lots of scenic forestry but lots of frustrating up and down. No gradients likely to create a Murito speciality zone, no climbs long enough for the endurance climbers to be favoured, but no respite. After the intermediate sprint in Zella-Mehlis with 55km to go, there are three climbs back to back, first the scenic Ruppberg, which is short-to-mid length and inconsistent, but backs absolutely directly into a climb which goes by the official name of Grenzadler, but crests at the legendary aforementioned DKB-Ski-Arena, the Oberhof biathlon arena which is arguably the most famous of all the venues for the sport. This climb is hardly steep (averaging 4,5%) though the last two kilometres are around 6%; straight off the back of the Ruppberg with no respite however we could see the break start to splinter here. The descent goes through the actual town of Oberhof with a fairly gradual but in its second half quite technical descent before the final climb, which crests with 25km remaining.

The Großer Beerberg is the highest peak in the Thüringer Wald, although the road that we are climbing does not go all the way to the top. The road actually passes slightly higher than we're going, passing between the Großer Beerberg and its neighbour, Schneekopf, however this road would only lead us back into Zella-Mehlis or Oberhof. Instead we're heading south by including all the steeper lower slopes of the climb but at the Waldgasthof of Schmücke we continue on to the south towards our finish.
Image

After this summit, the riders have a brief descent, about 5km flat, then around 8km of shallow descent before the rest of the stage is simply downhill false flat to the line in the town of Schleusingen, close to the border between Thüringen and Bayern. This is in some ways along the lines of the stage of the 2014 Tour that Tony Martin won on his long-range breakaway; here the climbs are easier, but they are also placed nearer the finish to make a sort of micro-version. Controlling this will be the key because a break could easily get out of sight and out of mind here, and groups could splinter. We could see anything from a complete GC shakedown to, if a team is strong enough and backs their guy enough to strangle those breakaways, the likes of Gerrans being interjected as a possibility.

Hanau:
Image

Schleusingen:
Image
User avatar Libertine Seguros
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23 Aug 2015 09:05

How many riders would you have per team?
User avatar lemon cheese cake
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23 Aug 2015 21:50

Libertine, I really like stage 7, that sstage could have many different possible outcomes and should be fun to watch.
I have designed a Vuelta Ciclista a Venezuela because the real one is too easy and has, at least for my taste, too many flat stages for the sprinters.
Right now don't have time to post the race, I'll start posting it in one or 2 weeks.
The race will have 10 stages like the real Vuelta a Venezuela, but it wil be a way harder race, hard climbs, am ITT of decent length, stages at high altitude and even a few hilly/medium mountain stages.
We won't visit Tachira, but we'll have more than enough climbing.
User avatar Mayomaniac
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