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So if Ti frames have a such a magical ride quality, why use carbon forks?

Which tyres for Paris-Roubaix? Whose time trial bike is fastest? Suspension mountain bikes or singlespeeders? Talk equipment here.

So if Ti frames have a such a magical ride quality, why use carbon forks?

28 Oct 2011 20:14

Was directed over to Moots from cyclingnews for their RSL frameset.

Frame looks great (artisan like welds) and all that but I couldn't help but notice a carbon fork.

So if Ti provides the ultimate ride quality (like all Ti mfgs claim), why not use it for the fork too?

Or DOES carbon do something Ti can't?
richwagmn
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28 Oct 2011 21:22

Easier to shape carbon into whatever aeroshapes you want would be one thing.
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28 Oct 2011 21:31

Ti forks are very expensive to make and heavier than carbon fiber. It's the same reason why you don't see titanium drop handlebars. I'm sure there are some ti forks out there, but it is a purely economic reason why they are a rarity. Why pay more for something heavier which ultimately MIGHT provide marginal performance benefits? Just a thought.

edit: Titanium is not renowned for its stiffness, something paramount in a good fork design.
Parera
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29 Oct 2011 02:42

richwagmn wrote:Was directed over to Moots from cyclingnews for their RSL frameset.

Frame looks great (artisan like welds) and all that but I couldn't help but notice a carbon fork.

So if Ti provides the ultimate ride quality (like all Ti mfgs claim), why not use it for the fork too?

Or DOES carbon do something Ti can't?


It's light. Lighter than alloys. Consumers like carbon stuff.
Consumers at the Moots level take on the gram counting behavior for no reason I could ever comprehend.
Carbon forks makes their product fit better in the market.
User avatar DirtyWorks
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29 Oct 2011 02:58

DirtyWorks wrote:It's light. Lighter than alloys. Consumers like carbon stuff.
Consumers at the Moots level take on the gram counting behavior for no reason I could ever comprehend.
Carbon forks makes their product fit better in the market.


Nope. People who buy ti are not looking for the world's lightest bike.

Titanium is not very suitable for road forks because large diameter fork blades would be required to reduce flex.

Black Sheep makes a titanium rigid fork for MTBs. They also make a ti fork for CX. The flex gives a little cush.

EDIT: Found a pic of a Black Sheep road fork. It's beefalicious.

Image
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29 Oct 2011 03:12

BroDeal wrote:Image


Ewww. Gross.
Parera
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29 Oct 2011 03:20

Parera wrote:Ewww. Gross.


Yeah. That's one of the issues. While a ti fork looks fine on a rigid MTB, it does not look very elegant on a road bike.

Also consider that a Moots seatpost costs $250 - $300. If they made a fork it would cost several times that.
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User avatar BroDeal
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29 Oct 2011 04:43

I'm glad I stuck around this forum long enough and rummaged through enough historical posts to decide that I didn't want to bother with a carbon bike. I think my original post here was regarding the quality of no name carbon on ebay. Since then I've done a complete 180. Zero interest in carbon frames (although there are a few beautiful ones out there, but not at bargain prices). I'm sure if I was racer or whatever it would (rightly) matter, but I ain't and it doesn't.

That ti fork is pretty fugly. like mentioned above, it looks too burly for the frame.
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29 Oct 2011 13:21

richwagmn wrote:Was directed over to Moots from cyclingnews for their RSL frameset.

Frame looks great (artisan like welds) and all that but I couldn't help but notice a carbon fork.

So if Ti provides the ultimate ride quality (like all Ti mfgs claim), why not use it for the fork too?

Or DOES carbon do something Ti can't?


To make a ti fork, the legs would have to be huge to be stiff enough to make it work. There are ti forks out there, fairly soft tho-

As for 'ride quality', subjective. I like my Moots and waterford(steel), didn't like my Calfee.

http://www.alibaba.com/showroom/titanium-bike-fork.html
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29 Oct 2011 22:53

BroDeal wrote:Nope. People who buy ti are not looking for the world's lightest bike.

Titanium is not very suitable for road forks because large diameter fork blades would be required to reduce flex.

Black Sheep makes a titanium rigid fork for MTBs. They also make a ti fork for CX. The flex gives a little cush.

EDIT: Found a pic of a Black Sheep road fork. It's beefalicious.

Image


Road bike? More like Touring bike. Definitely not what the Q was about.
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30 Oct 2011 05:17

ElChingon wrote:Road bike? More like Touring bike. Definitely not what the Q was about.


A road fork would look the same. Titanium is flexy if the tubing isn't large. Increasing the required material would make for an absurdly expensive fork. As I said, the reason you don't see titanium drop handlebars is the same reason you don't see titanium forks, simple economics. Other materials perform better at a fraction of the cost.
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30 Oct 2011 07:21

Parera wrote:A road fork would look the same. Titanium is flexy if the tubing isn't large. Increasing the required material would make for an absurdly expensive fork. As I said, the reason you don't see titanium drop handlebars is the same reason you don't see titanium forks, simple economics. Other materials perform better at a fraction of the cost.


So might as well go with a carbon frame, I get ya!
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User avatar ElChingon
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30 Oct 2011 07:46

ElChingon wrote:So might as well go with a carbon frame, I get ya!


You don't have to have thick titanium tubes to make a proper frame. You do for a fork. Why is this hard to understand? :confused:
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30 Oct 2011 08:01

ElChingon wrote:So might as well go with a carbon frame, I get ya!


Steel is a great choice.
Parera
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01 Nov 2011 13:29

So do people always get custom Ti frames?

I'd love to build a Ti bike one day.
richwagmn
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01 Nov 2011 20:09

richwagmn wrote:So do people always get custom Ti frames?

I'd love to build a Ti bike one day.


http://www.habcycles.com

Mine is a stock size. It's heavier than carbon and aluminum bikes I have owned but I don't care, it will always be there for me.
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