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Where do you draw the line?

Discuss your experiences road riding, share knowledge or other general road cycling topics. A doping discussion free forum.

Where do you stop the razor?

Knicks Line
9
17%
Bikini Line
18
33%
Balls and All
8
15%
Leipheimer
4
7%
Every Hair is Sacred
15
28%
 
Total votes : 54

26 Apr 2012 14:18

When I get so good that I need to worry about how quickly I recover from cut or grazed legs and getting a nice massage I'll shave my legs.
Swifty's Cakes
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26 Apr 2012 16:04

Swifty's Cakes wrote:When I get so good that I need to worry about how quickly I recover from cut or grazed legs and getting a nice massage I'll shave my legs.


Good call. Wounds are less messy and easier to clean without hair, and a massage from your soigneur is less likely to end up ripping hairs out/tangling them up if haven't got them.

Didn't know that it healed much quicker. Is that a documented thing or just personal experience?
User avatar Caruut
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26 Apr 2012 18:04

Bespoke wrote:Greetings all,

Is there another sport, other than swimming perhaps - and even then I'm not sure it trickles down to recreational swimmers, where a similar body "adjustment", is part of engaging in the sport?

In Canada, hockey players usually sacrifice their front teeth to the game but I'm pretty sure that's by circumstance, rather than by choice.


But if it's that common, and I don't doubt it is, it is kind of by choice - i.e., I love hockey, I wonder when I'm gonna get my teeth knocked out. :D Personally, I'd rather sacrifice the hair.

I say this as someone who, rather suddenly, has been seduced by cycling and am finding this whole shaving thing a bit weird.

Don't get me wrong, as a dedicated aesthete, I certainly appreciate the appearance of a hairless body but, that's part of the problem for me: it seems fetishistic, narcissistic and, some might say homoerotic. Not that there's anything wrong with any of these attributes! I'm really trying to understand it from the periphery, realizing that the vortex of passion for the sport is likely going to lead to an inevitable question:

"To shave or not to shave?" :D
That's precisely the point. It is all those things, in a sport widely acknowledged as having those characteristics underlying. But what they underlie - the overt reasons - are respect for traditional practices, of which shaving is one, and practical concerns - see below.

Caruut wrote:Good call. Wounds are less messy and easier to clean without hair, and a massage from your soigneur is less likely to end up ripping hairs out/tangling them up if haven't got them.

Didn't know that it healed much quicker. Is that a documented thing or just personal experience?


The main reason for it all along, in my view, is that some men look like apes when they're unshaven. Especially in Southern Europe where much of pro cycling has its roots. Who'd want to see a hairy ape on a bike? Nobody, that's who.

I'm lucky in that the hair on my legs is blond and sparse, so it looks like I shave even though I don't. If I were racing, or had time to train for hours a day, then I would shave, for the reasons Caruut stated. And if I had noticeable hair, I'd be shaving anyway. Hairy, burly legs in cycling kit just isn't right.
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User avatar Maxiton
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26 Apr 2012 19:00

badboyberty wrote:How high is too high?


Wow. I think I remember that conversation from my freshman year in college. Far out, man.
User avatar MarkvW
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26 Apr 2012 19:46

Maxiton wrote:But if it's that common, and I don't doubt it is, it is kind of by choice - i.e., I love hockey, I wonder when I'm gonna get my teeth knocked out. :D Personally, I'd rather sacrifice the hair.

That's precisely the point. It is all those things, in a sport widely acknowledged as having those characteristics underlying. But what they underlie - the overt reasons - are respect for traditional practices, of which shaving is one, and practical concerns - see below.



The main reason for it all along, in my view, is that some men look like apes when they're unshaven. Especially in Southern Europe where much of pro cycling has its roots. Who'd want to see a hairy ape on a bike? Nobody, that's who.

I'm lucky in that the hair on my legs is blond and sparse, so it looks like I shave even though I don't. If I were racing, or had time to train for hours a day, then I would shave, for the reasons Caruut stated. And if I had noticeable hair, I'd be shaving anyway. Hairy, burly legs in cycling kit just isn't right.


Thank you for the considered response Maxiton. Respect for traditional practices is a noble pursuit.

As a fascinated newcomer, I did not know of the underlying characteristics of the sport.
User avatar Bespoke
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27 Apr 2012 01:13

Caruut wrote:Good call. Wounds are less messy and easier to clean without hair, and a massage from your soigneur is less likely to end up ripping hairs out/tangling them up if haven't got them.

Didn't know that it healed much quicker. Is that a documented thing or just personal experience?


From my own experience and NOT referring to any scientific claims or anything: generally speaking, the hair/ no hair option affects several parts of the overall wound experience.

Accident: A smooth leg will often get almost burn style large surface injury where in the same accident, a hairy skin surface can seem to dig in more. Some hairs are ripped out, others remain and the surface to surface friction is higher resulting in a "deeper" and more irregular wound.

Healing: THe healing time of these two types of wounds are different. Then there is the second impact of hair. If the wound is serious enough to need something like "Op-site" then the hair will need to be removed first or it won't work properly (and be a b!tch to remove). Even without opsite, hair makes wound treatment unpleasant because you are trying to add or remove adhesive dressings on an irregular and painful surface.

Often a smooth leg can get away with some topical cream where in the same circumstances a hairy leg will have a messier injury that requires wound dressings and can leave scarring.

In this photo of Jens' leg, you can see in the image below that the larger patch of "burn" is healing in a flat and regular manner, mainly because there is no hair cluttering up the scab.
Image
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User avatar Martin318is
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28 Apr 2012 08:24

Bespoke wrote:In Canada, hockey players usually sacrifice their front teeth to the game but I'm pretty sure that's by circumstance, rather than by choice.


[SIZE="5"]What?[/SIZE] I thought they gathered in a circle and took turns knocking each other's teeth out!
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User avatar RedheadDane
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28 Apr 2012 09:43

Martin318is wrote:From my own experience and NOT referring to any scientific claims or anything: generally speaking, the hair/ no hair option affects several parts of the overall wound experience.

Accident: A smooth leg will often get almost burn style large surface injury where in the same accident, a hairy skin surface can seem to dig in more. Some hairs are ripped out, others remain and the surface to surface friction is higher resulting in a "deeper" and more irregular wound.

Healing: THe healing time of these two types of wounds are different. Then there is the second impact of hair. If the wound is serious enough to need something like "Op-site" then the hair will need to be removed first or it won't work properly (and be a b!tch to remove). Even without opsite, hair makes wound treatment unpleasant because you are trying to add or remove adhesive dressings on an irregular and painful surface.

Often a smooth leg can get away with some topical cream where in the same circumstances a hairy leg will have a messier injury that requires wound dressings and can leave scarring.

In this photo of Jens' leg, you can see in the image below that the larger patch of "burn" is healing in a flat and regular manner, mainly because there is no hair cluttering up the scab.
Image

finally, someone that knows what they are talking about
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User avatar CobbleStoner
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28 Apr 2012 11:37

MarkvW wrote:How much of a difference in speed does shaving make, anyway?


5 seconds in a 40km time trial. Chester Kyle 1987
[color="DarkGreen"][SIZE="2"]"I thought of that while riding my bicycle." ~ Albert Einstein on the Theory of Relativity[/SIZE][/color]
User avatar Polyarmour
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28 Apr 2012 12:32

Bespoke wrote:Greetings all,

Is there another sport, other than swimming perhaps - and even then I'm not sure it trickles down to recreational swimmers, where a similar body "adjustment", is part of engaging in the sport?



Body building (if you can call that a sport)
User avatar LongSprint
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28 Apr 2012 12:37

When I have hairy legs I always end up pinching the hairs in a painful way when I try to put on/adjust knee warmers and shorts. Also tights feel weird.

It's just an option, of course when I shave my legs I don't imagine I suddenly become a pro rider.
User avatar Cancellator
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28 Apr 2012 17:17

CobbleStoner wrote:finally, someone that knows what they are talking about


He just elaborated (well) on a point the rest of us made. What are you talking about?
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User avatar Maxiton
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28 Apr 2012 17:29

LongSprint wrote:Body building (if you can call that a sport)


Of course - I didn't think of that one. ;)

Interesting though, with bodybuilding, the sport is judged on aesthetic criteria whereas with cycling, it's clearly not - yet the "clean" body is "preferred".

It is (for me anyway) an interesting cultural trope of cycling. :cool:
User avatar Bespoke
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30 Apr 2012 15:45

I would only shave if I was racing, for obvious reasons, but the thing is I'm not racing and I keep my hair thank you very much, I'm too lazy to shave anyway.
Signed: a hairy *******
User avatar lukinox
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