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2012 Giro d'Italia, May 7th, stage 3: Horsens → Horsens, 190K

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09 May 2012 15:48

gooner wrote:Renshaw and Thomas are happy to dish it out to Ferrari for his stupid mistake but they said nothing about Cav from the Tour de Suisse. They just turned a blind eye to it.

After winning stage 2 Cav was criticising Farrar saying he is always swinging from right to left in the sprint and now he is going around as if he never did anything wrong on a sprint himself.

Ferrari never saw Cav when he moved out right and took him down. Cav did see Haussler but he still made that stupid move when he cut across him.

Ferrari deserves the criticism he is getting from a racing perspective for the stupid move he did, but some of the criticism he is getting is making him out to be some sort of criminal. Give me a break.

Like Sean Kelly said it is bike racing and unfortunately this won`t be the last crash we see in a sprint. The way people are going around it is as if this crash was the first one they ever seen in a finishing sprint.


Italians riding Italian bikes, are generally better bike handlers then riders from other countries. What Ferrari did was make an unnecessary move and cause A CRASH WHICH WAS UNAVOIDABLE to the other riders. It happens, in bunch sprints in races like the GIRO and TOUR. All the riders (SPRINTERS)want face time for themselves and sponsors.

Again, watching old footage of Italians great bike handlers, and every Italian bike(or copy of Italian Racing geometry) is something magnificent to behold.
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09 May 2012 18:07

plooton wrote:see this vid. Favelli jumping over Cavendish fallen and lying on the road.
http://video.gazzetta.it/giro-di-italia/index.shtml


Here's the direct link:

http://video.gazzetta.it/racconto-incredibile-salto-volata-horsens-/01a74018-9941-11e1-918c-5f02d8042a39

Wish there was a ground view to see the height he got to jump over him, Cav owes him a big thanks. :cool:
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09 May 2012 19:03

BillytheKid wrote: That line was Cav's and he wins a lot of races not just on sheer speed, but on putting himself in the right spot...which is exactly where he was...

Absolutely not. Cav was too far back. He was the fastest guy and he was on the right line, but had he been led out as well as he often has been, or had he and his leadout managed to avoid him getting boxed in, he would never have been in a position for Ferrari to think he could pull such a move in the first place. I'm not saying Cavendish was at fault - obviously he wasn't - but a guy with a strong leadout and a guy as good as Cavendish would not normally be placed behind Ferrari in the sprint, but he got boxed. Ferrari's move was boneheaded at best and downright irresponsible, but he may not have expected a rider to be coming from behind him with the speed Cavendish was coming at, and thought he had a lot more room than he actually had. Against lesser sprinters, it would have been reckless, but with a guy as fast as Cavendish coming up behind him (which is probably not an experience Ferrari is used to dealing with!) it was downright suicidal.
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10 May 2012 02:54

Libertine Seguros wrote:Absolutely not. Cav was too far back...Ferrari's move was boneheaded at best and downright irresponsible...it was downright suicidal.


Agreed that Cav' was out of position to contest the sprint effectively. With Ferrari's move, there is no "best" though - there's no way to mitigate the recklessness and disrespect and contempt for his fellow riders that Ferrari's move conveyed.

Since the race jury is obviously incapable of enforcing the minimum standards of "respect" and professional courtesy that sprinters like Cavendish and Boonen have noted is in short supply in bunch finishes these last few years, it's really up to Ferrari's peers to seek retribution on the road and make an example of him. The downside to the absence of Lance from pro cycling is that there is NO patrón you can turn to - or collude with - in moments like these when his existence would be beneficial to ensuring that kamikaze riders who would otherwise put the entire bunch in danger are intimidated into following a less-dangerous course.

I won't recite specific instances of the "street justice" that I'm referring to, but it's happened in the past, and it should happen now. Ferrari's contempt for Cav', Phinney and others was confirmed by the interview he gave after the race, and the fact that he put forth a more contrite face later, only after Savio had attempted damage control, is meaningless and should in no way be interpreted as evidence that he cares about the damage he did or that he feels chastened.

As long as it can be done without endangering any other riders, Ferrari's one-way ticket on the roadrash/broken jaw express should be punched. He's a kamikaze and there's only one way to neutralize a kamikaze: take him out before he takes you down.
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10 May 2012 04:57

Take it to the bank. There will be macho head games directed at Ferrari for quite some time.
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10 May 2012 07:47

ElChingon wrote:Here's the direct link:

http://video.gazzetta.it/racconto-incredibile-salto-volata-horsens-/01a74018-9941-11e1-918c-5f02d8042a39

Wish there was a ground view to see the height he got to jump over him, Cav owes him a big thanks. :cool:


That guy could retire now knowing he did one of the most awesome things ever in cycling (i may overdoing it a bit here :p)
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10 May 2012 23:05

joe_papp wrote:Agreed that Cav' was out of position to contest the sprint effectively. With Ferrari's move, there is no "best" though - there's no way to mitigate the recklessness and disrespect and contempt for his fellow riders that Ferrari's move conveyed.

Since the race jury is obviously incapable of enforcing the minimum standards of "respect" and professional courtesy that sprinters like Cavendish and Boonen have noted is in short supply in bunch finishes these last few years, it's really up to Ferrari's peers to seek retribution on the road and make an example of him. The downside to the absence of Lance from pro cycling is that there is NO patrón you can turn to - or collude with - in moments like these when his existence would be beneficial to ensuring that kamikaze riders who would otherwise put the entire bunch in danger are intimidated into following a less-dangerous course.

I won't recite specific instances of the "street justice" that I'm referring to, but it's happened in the past, and it should happen now. Ferrari's contempt for Cav', Phinney and others was confirmed by the interview he gave after the race, and the fact that he put forth a more contrite face later, only after Savio had attempted damage control, is meaningless and should in no way be interpreted as evidence that he cares about the damage he did or that he feels chastened.

As long as it can be done without endangering any other riders, Ferrari's one-way ticket on the roadrash/broken jaw express should be punched. He's a kamikaze and there's only one way to neutralize a kamikaze: take him out before he takes you down.


Wondering here if Ferraris' bonehead move(when he himself had no chance of a podium was collusion with other teams to block Cavendish.
From what I understand these mini 'mafias' might form to block a certain rider, and for sure Ferraris move was a blocking move.
Again without a patron or godfather in the peloton, these moves like Ferraris' will continue to happen, over and over and riders like Haussler, Boonen, Cav, Farrar, Phinney will be taken out. That is really unfortunate, to lose quality riders for no real benefit to the sport as a whole.
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10 May 2012 23:17

Yes. I heard the vile Italians and Spaniards are all mafiosi; all of them try to take as much Anglosaxon riders out as possible. You remember that orange rider, VELASCO, taking down Lance in the 2010 Tour? He was payed by Contador VELASCO to fall right in front of him. As Cav at top speed goes as fast as a FERRARI, it's no wonder FERRARI tried to knock him out deliberately. These moves will become more and more frequent. You noticed these Italian herbs attacking Phinney yesterday? They obviously saw him as a big threat.

We need a new LANCE to put an end to these terrible moves. Lance even chased SIMEONI down, and hell, Simeoni was a big capo in this fearful mafia! Our next all-American TDF winner, Taylor PHINNEY, just needs to man up a little: he might become the hero to finally stop these vilains!
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10 May 2012 23:18

Don Johnson wrote:Wondering here if Ferraris' bonehead move(when he himself had no chance of a podium was collusion with other teams to block Cavendish.
From what I understand these mini 'mafias' might form to block a certain rider, and for sure Ferraris move was a blocking move.
Again without a patron or godfather in the peloton, these moves like Ferraris' will continue to happen, over and over and riders like Haussler, Boonen, Cav, Farrar, Phinney will be taken out. That is really unfortunate, to lose quality riders for no real benefit to the sport as a whole.


No, Ferrari had a very good shot at a podium, Farrar got third, and he could have easily jumped past had he been in the slip stream.

Ferrari saw Farrar go and realised that his wheel was the place to be, he just saw it too late and Cav was already there. Stupid and dangerous, but not deliberate.
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17 May 2012 00:45

Don't forget to catch on all the exclusive Giro coverage on Universal Sports.

Go to universalsports.com to check out the latest highlights from Stage 11:

Stage 11 Review: http://universalsports.com/vid...-reviewing-the-race/

Roberto Ferrari Wins Stage 11: http://universalsports.com/vid...-ferrari-is-fastest/

Also Catch "Countdown To London" Wednesdays at 8 p.m. ET on Universal Sports. Check up on the world’s best athletes every week as they prepare and train for their shot at Olympic glory! The Opening Ceremonies are only two months away, and no other show on TV will get you more geared up for the Summer Games than #C2L!
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