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Less well known cycling records or facts

A place to discuss all things related to current professional road races. Here, you can also touch on the latest news relating to professional road racing. A doping discussion free forum.

03 Jan 2013 10:38

Michael Rasmussen is known for his care for detail when considering weight.

He is known for peeling off unnecessary stickers from his bike due to the additional grams.

He used to count each grain of rice before eating and had water with his breakfast cereal, not milk.

Source.
I was awarded 'Most Aggressive Rider of the Day', generally given to the most spectacular loser of the day.

― David Millar, Racing Through the Dark
User avatar Don't be late Pedro
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03 Jan 2013 11:17

Don't be late Pedro wrote:Michael Rasmussen is known for his care for detail when considering weight.

He is known for peeling off unnecessary stickers from his bike due to the additional grams.

He used to count each grain of rice before eating and had water with his breakfast cereal, not milk.

Source.


Lol, what a waste of time. :eek:

No wonder he was slim. He wouldn't have had much time to eat after counting all the grains of rice.:D
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03 Jan 2013 11:33

Bernard Hinault once featured on the cover of a French disco record.

Image

Source.
I was awarded 'Most Aggressive Rider of the Day', generally given to the most spectacular loser of the day.

― David Millar, Racing Through the Dark
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03 Jan 2013 11:40

The phrase “King of the Mountains” comes from 1905 when René Pottier climbed the Grand Ballon in the Alsace region. Riding for a team with Peugeot bikes, the company’s factory was down the road and workers lined the climb. The spectacle was so great that newspaper L’Auto proclaimed Pottier as “le roi de la montagne“, or the king of the mountain. Source.
I was awarded 'Most Aggressive Rider of the Day', generally given to the most spectacular loser of the day.

― David Millar, Racing Through the Dark
User avatar Don't be late Pedro
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03 Jan 2013 12:09

Netserk wrote:Alberto counts but Flandis doesn't? :confused:


Landis won a stage
Red Rick
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03 Jan 2013 12:16

Red Rick wrote:Landis won a stage

As mentioned in a previous post, (I think) Netserk was wondering why I indirectly credited Contador (2010) with a Tour win and not Landis (2005) when both were stripped.
I was awarded 'Most Aggressive Rider of the Day', generally given to the most spectacular loser of the day.

― David Millar, Racing Through the Dark
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03 Jan 2013 13:13

Don't be late Pedro wrote:Cheers Hitch/ILoveCycling.

In 2001 Angel Casero won the Vuelta. He triumphed without winning a stage. Actually, he was not top 3 in any stage. In fact, he never even wore the leaders Jersey until winning the final time trial. [url=http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2001_Vuelta_a_España]Source[/url]


Obviously, this is a self contradictory sentence.
Waterloo Sunrise
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03 Jan 2013 13:36

Waterloo Sunrise wrote:Obviously, this is a self contradictory sentence.

That should read

In fact, he never even wore the leaders Jersey until winning after the final time trial.
I was awarded 'Most Aggressive Rider of the Day', generally given to the most spectacular loser of the day.

― David Millar, Racing Through the Dark
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03 Jan 2013 17:50

Jan Raas won the 1978 Tour prologue, but because of a dramatic shift in the weather, he was not given the Maillot Jaune, even though his name went into the record books as the Prologue winner. Source.

Don't be late Pedro wrote:Actually looking into this more it seems that 4 people including Bugno have done this.
Girardengo (1919) Binda (1927) Merckx (1973) Bugno (1990)


Any Tour or Vuelta stats on this? (Too lazy to look it up).

Great thread BTW.
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03 Jan 2013 18:59

The annual Cima Coppi prize for the rider who wins the highest mountain summit in the Giro was established in 1965. The highest summit has been the Passo dello Stelvio (2758m), which has been used 6 times since then. On three occasions the Cima Coppi has been outside of Italy, in a different country each time. In 1971 the prize was given away for crossing the Großglockner, in Austria; in 1982 the Cima Coppi went to France, given on the Col d'Izoard, although the riders did not crest the full summit of the climb, finishing at 2361m; and in 1985 the highest point was the Simplonpass, in Switzerland. At 2005m, this remains the lowest ever Cima Coppi in the Giro's history. The next lowest is Sestrières, at 2035m, in 2009. Had the original Blockhaus stage not been shortened, this would have been the Cima Coppi, but would still have been the 2nd lowest of all time.
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04 Jan 2013 03:56

Don't be late Pedro wrote:As mentioned in a previous post, (I think) Netserk was wondering why I indirectly credited Contador (2010) with a Tour win and not Landis (2005) when both were stripped.


Yes, both were stripped of the overall, but I think the point everyone else is making is that without either getting stripped Landis wouldn't have qualified anyway.

If Landis wasn't stripped, he won a stage, so didn't meet the requirements of the category anyway.
abbaskip
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04 Jan 2013 04:35

abbaskip wrote:Yes, both were stripped of the overall, but I think the point everyone else is making is that without either getting stripped Landis wouldn't have qualified anyway.

If Landis wasn't stripped, he won a stage, so didn't meet the requirements of the category anyway.

Right but at no point did I include Landis (Unless if was in reference to other posts?). But yes, the Morzine stage would be hard to forget.

I guess you can either have Contador (2010) or Oscar Pereiro (2006) depending on your take on things (and being somewhat consistent). :)
I was awarded 'Most Aggressive Rider of the Day', generally given to the most spectacular loser of the day.

― David Millar, Racing Through the Dark
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04 Jan 2013 05:09

Alpe d'Huez wrote:Jan Raas won the 1978 Tour prologue, but because of a dramatic shift in the weather, he was not given the Maillot Jaune, even though his name went into the record books as the Prologue winner. Source.



Any Tour or Vuelta stats on this? (Too lazy to look it up).

Great thread BTW.


http://nl.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ronde_van_Spanje_1977
Ryo Hazuki wrote:horrible. boonen just the same guy as years before and this course is too hard for him. that's why he rode like a coward there were at least 3 guys stronger than boonen today and none of them won: sagan, ballan, pozzato


The Hitch wrote:Goss will woop boonens candy a[color="Black"]ss[/color] in a sprint he cares about, any day of the week
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04 Jan 2013 10:50

Alpe d'Huez wrote:Any Tour or Vuelta stats on this? (Too lazy to look it up).

Tour winners who lead from start to finish (There may be others)

Maurice Garin (1903) Source
Philippe Thys (1914) Source
Ottavio Bottecchia (1924) Source
Nicolas Frantz (1928) Source
Romain Maes (1935) Source
I was awarded 'Most Aggressive Rider of the Day', generally given to the most spectacular loser of the day.

― David Millar, Racing Through the Dark
User avatar Don't be late Pedro
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04 Jan 2013 10:53

Has anyone worn the leaders jersey on all stages including the prologue? That implies winning the Grand Tour the previous year and starting the prologue wearing the leaders jersey.
Ryo Hazuki wrote:contador is such a coward :o
User avatar Hugo Koblet
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04 Jan 2013 11:11

Hugo Koblet wrote:Has anyone worn the leaders jersey on all stages including the prologue? That implies winning the Grand Tour the previous year and starting the prologue wearing the leaders jersey.

Well, the first prologue was in 1967 so if you are including only those tours I don't think anyone has led the race from start to finish in any one Tour.

The formal history, therefore, is that the first yellow jersey was worn by the Frenchman Eugène Christophe in the stage from Grenoble to Geneva on July 18, 1919. Source

That being the case Nicolas Frantz looks the best candidate since he won the 1927 edition and then led from start to finish in 1928.

Interestingly enough
The yellow jersey on the first day of the Tour is traditionally permitted to be worn by the winner of the previous year's race; however, wearing it is a choice left to the rider, and in recent years has gone out of fashion. If the winner does not ride, the jersey is not worn. Source


I had always assumed that there was a rules change where no one was allowed to wear it for the first stage/prologue.
I was awarded 'Most Aggressive Rider of the Day', generally given to the most spectacular loser of the day.

― David Millar, Racing Through the Dark
User avatar Don't be late Pedro
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04 Jan 2013 11:30

The French bank, Crédit Lyonnais, has sponsored the maillot jaune since 1987. It is they who award the toy lion (le lion en peluche) to each day's winner as a play on its name.
I was awarded 'Most Aggressive Rider of the Day', generally given to the most spectacular loser of the day.

― David Millar, Racing Through the Dark
User avatar Don't be late Pedro
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04 Jan 2013 14:08

Don't be late Pedro wrote:I had always assumed that there was a rules change wear no one was allowed to wear it for the first stage/prologue.


Yeah, that was my assumption as well. I guess the technical answer to my question is no then.
Ryo Hazuki wrote:contador is such a coward :o
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04 Jan 2013 16:23

Bradley Wiggins is the first british winner of the Tour de France, but he wasn't the first british rider, who has won a three week stage race. In 1988 Cayn Theakston fought against bad roads, hard crashes and his own team to win Volta a Portugal after 19 stages.

http://www.pezcyclingnews.com/default.asp?pg=fullstory&id=4503
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04 Jan 2013 20:02

wow i did not know that portugal was that big. probably it was a 3week circuit race around portugal.
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