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Can Blanco be the next HTC?

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Can Blanco be the next HTC?

Yes, they have the right set-up and mix of talents
7
11%
No, they lack leaders like Stapleton, Aldag and Holm, and the riders aren't that talented
42
69%
Hard to say, depends if they can shake off their Rabo past
12
20%
 
Total votes : 61

11 Apr 2013 14:56

pastronef wrote:any news os some possible new sponsor deal?

AGR is in 3 days, they hoped to have a sponsor before the end of spring classics. hopefully after Vanmarcke great podium at roubaix, they will perform well in the ardennes.


Does winning matter ?

I mean HTC in example won ****loads and still ceased to exist.
Gloin22
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11 Apr 2013 15:15

Gloin22 wrote:Does winning matter ?

I mean HTC in example won ****loads and still ceased to exist.


actually i was looking for the Team Blanco 2013 thread but I could not find it
so I used this thread to ask about it's sponsor search

ok ok. just joking :D its
pastronef
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11 Apr 2013 16:08

Gloin22 wrote:Does winning matter ?

I mean HTC in example won ****loads and still ceased to exist.


Just because one team won a lot and couldn't find a sponsor doesn't mean winning is irrelevant, just that in HTC's case there were other issues. The team were probably also looking at a much higher wage bill or less beastly squad. A lot of stars on less money than they probably are now, so a sponsor is either looking at paying much more or getting much less than HTC did out of their sponsorship.

Their style of racing - racking up the numbers in sprint stages - made them very much a team to appeal to the casual fan. The casual fan, however, is generally most interested in "home" success. Despite the international squad, however, there was only one big winner: Cavendish. As such, they were probably best placed to appeal to the British fan. Unluckily for them, the British cycling market had recently been pretty much saturated by the SkyBorg.

Even if they had found a British sponsor, they would have struggled to finance any British leaders other than Cavendish. With Sky desperate for Brits to lead their squad, talented British riders to get the fans interested when Cav isn't riding would cost an absolute fortune. So a "British" identity was pretty much out of the question because of Sky, but any other would have been difficult because of Cav.

For those reasons they couldn't attract medium-sized domestic companies like Lotto or Omega Pharma, as they would have lacked sufficient penetration in any individual market to justify the sponsorship. As such, only transnational companies are going to be valid sponsors, which restricts the choice of sponsors. Those big companies don't want to risk cycling sponsorship and the potential fallout.

Winning might not guarantee you a sponsor, but it's certainly better than not winning.
User avatar Caruut
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11 Apr 2013 18:10

TheEnoculator wrote:It's no secret that Blanco wants to be the next HTC. Blanco can pose threats in all aspects in the WT, and the fact that they are so desperate for a sponsor should take their competitive spirits up a notch. But the question is: can they deliver the results necessary to be a Cinderella team like HTC, assuming they will exist beyond this season?


No, they have too much respect for cycling to become that.
User avatar Libertine Seguros
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11 Apr 2013 18:18

Gloin22 wrote:Does winning matter ?

I mean HTC in example won ****loads and still ceased to exist.


Blanco at least have one thing in their favour: a clear identity. Blanco are a Dutch team, first and foremost. They may need to downsize, they may need to drop a level, or whatever, but the team bosses can try to target Dutch sponsors who would see the benefit in having the team. That's quite a large part of why Eusebio Unzué was able to get a new sponsor when Caisse d'Epargne pulled out, while B*b S*******n wasn't able to find one for High Road; Unzué and his guys were able to appeal to target Spanish companies for sponsorships with a bit of a patriotism card to play, despite that they were going to be a weaker team that year (after all, they'd lost Valverde, LL Sánchez and some useful prospects like Urán). HTC didn't have that. They were de facto an American team, but without a very strong American identity (there was no clear core of American riders like there is a clear Dutch core at Blanco). They had formerly been a German team (they were coasting on the T-Mobile payout) but trying to sell a major German company on cycling at that point was going to be tough. Also, they had the problem that they were perhaps too successful for their own good. A team like Caisse actually had a pretty small budget for the amount of success they had. HTC's budget wasn't as big as many, but a lot of that was due to the coasting on the T-Mobile payout and that quite a few riders were still on contracts from earlier days and could rightfully demand much better salaries further along the line. Therefore, the cost of buying out HTC to the sponsor would likely be much higher, at least if they wanted the team complete with the likes of Cavendish and Martin.
User avatar Libertine Seguros
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11 Apr 2013 18:42

Libertine Seguros wrote:Blanco at least have one thing in their favour: a clear identity. Blanco are a Dutch team, first and foremost. They may need to downsize, they may need to drop a level, or whatever, but the team bosses can try to target Dutch sponsors who would see the benefit in having the team. That's quite a large part of why Eusebio Unzué was able to get a new sponsor when Caisse d'Epargne pulled out, while B*b S*******n wasn't able to find one for High Road; Unzué and his guys were able to appeal to target Spanish companies for sponsorships with a bit of a patriotism card to play, despite that they were going to be a weaker team that year (after all, they'd lost Valverde, LL Sánchez and some useful prospects like Urán). HTC didn't have that. They were de facto an American team, but without a very strong American identity (there was no clear core of American riders like there is a clear Dutch core at Blanco). They had formerly been a German team (they were coasting on the T-Mobile payout) but trying to sell a major German company on cycling at that point was going to be tough. Also, they had the problem that they were perhaps too successful for their own good. A team like Caisse actually had a pretty small budget for the amount of success they had. HTC's budget wasn't as big as many, but a lot of that was due to the coasting on the T-Mobile payout and that quite a few riders were still on contracts from earlier days and could rightfully demand much better salaries further along the line. Therefore, the cost of buying out HTC to the sponsor would likely be much higher, at least if they wanted the team complete with the likes of Cavendish and Martin.


that's a good explaination. they really do have a strong Dutch identity.
it's a double sided point of view. right now, the Dutch medias are as scared as the German ones after 2008 (schumacher, t.mobile problems etc...)

so hopefully they will find someone who trust them, and ensure their future.
anyway I thought GIANT could step up (just like Cannondale) but it does not seem to happen
pastronef
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